#1
Are these any good for someone looking to buy a decent sounding USB mic?

Any tips for getting the best out of them?
#2
The tip for getting the best out of a USB mic is to go read the stickies.
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#3
Quote by GaryBillington
The tip for getting the best out of a USB mic is to go read the stickies.


Sorry I am new. Could you point me in the direction of them please?
#4
You had to skip right past them when you came to this forum....

Read this. All of it, not just the first post - the information is spread over several posts:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1658707
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#5
Quote by GaryBillington
You had to skip right past them when you came to this forum....

Read this. All of it, not just the first post - the information is spread over several posts:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1658707



Thanks. Can I just clarify that if I intend to record to Garage Band I need an interface and XLR mic, and not a multi track recorder?

I have assumed a multi track allows multiple instruments to be recorded at the same time and is portable without the need for a computer?
#6
Yes - multitrackers are an all in one solution, with no need for a PC & software.

If you want to use your PC, you'll need an interface.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#7
Quote by GaryBillington
Yes - multitrackers are an all in one solution, with no need for a PC & software.

If you want to use your PC, you'll need an interface.


Great thanks.

Is there usually any quality difference in a multi-track? Obviously it would be more convenient in some situations but I reckon it's beyond what I am after.

I reckon I could get a decent interface and mic for around £200.
#8
You mean in comparing a multitracker to using software? That depends what hardware you're comparing.

All multitrackers these days tend to have pretty good sound quality. If you're comparing one to a cheap interface, the multitracker will be better. If you're comparing one to a high quality interface, The interface will probably be better.

A multitracker will most definitely be better than the USB mics you were originally considering.

Convenience & ease of use are the main advantages of multitrackers. They provide good quality recordings, but probably not quite up to professional levels as all the effects etc you will need during the mixing & mastering are built in at the factory. They're easy to learn, and most have preloaded settings that will automatically do a lot of the hard work for you, a good product can be made simply by reading the manual.

With interfaces, you can get low end ones that work but aren't spectacular, or you can get a better one that has the potential to provide a professional quality product when combined with good software and experience. The main advantage of using an interface & PC setup is that you aren't limited to the factory installed capability, you can download as many patches, effects and whatever else you may need to improve your output as your skills grow. There is a lot more to learn, but there is almost infinite potential for improvement.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud