#1
Hello everybody,

Big questioning in this rainy evening....

I explain,

I play guitar since a few years, I don't know exactly, 5 years maybe and I was a quick learner. I have taken lesson with a local teacher for 1 year and a half.


I had a musical break of one year, and I took back the guitar this summer.
I'm really into chelsea grin, born of osiris, dream theater, periphery, the faceless and the deathcore, metal prog style

Therefore, I play approximately 3-4 hours a day, by working for the greater part on the technique and theory. But when comes the moment when I should relax and play some songs I like, I realize that I don't really know play complete songs.... When I learnt the guitar, I was into Metallica/megadeth/pantera/slayer, so my rhythmic level is pretty good, but when it comes to solo.... I played them "at my sauce" (not sure of the expression )

You go to tell me that it's good, but really, it isn't.... By doing this, it turns out that I have full of defect which I correct little by little now, but I also stagnates on lead guitar..... I really like what makes John Petrucci, but I cannot play his songs, because in lead guitar, I'm a big sh**...
I don't know any solo note for note....


So here is my question, to progress on solo, do you think that I should see again the standards of metal before taking on songs of dream theater, periphery, the faceless, by playing solos notes for notes of song of metallica, then pantera, then megadeth (classification by difficulty at solo level), and then play fast songs? Or should I directly take on more hard songs than I would like to play?

Sorry for my english, it's not my mothertongue
#2
It makes a lot of sense to make a logical progression through the songs you think easier and work up to things that you think are hard. As much as anything else because doing so means you'll end up with a much larger repertoire.

You can try and skip straight to the Dream Theater and so on... but it'll still take you months, or years, to be able to play the material. It's very easy to get really disheartened if you're just hacking away at the same material for ages and feeling like you're not making much progress.

All in all... I would say go for the gradual progression, it makes more sense over all, as long as you're playing songs you actually want to be able to play at every step of the way.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#3
here are couple things my teacher taught me to do when i was taking lessons and learning how to solo..

first break the solo up into different sections and learn them one section at a time and then piecing the sections together..
try putting the guitar down and singing or humming the notes in the solo, if you can do that then it will help you to play alot smoother

find a song/solo thats a little tougher then you think you can play and try that, break it up into sections like i said, you will be surprised how much easier it makes it..
Very Orange CARVIN DC 700
PRS SE Custom - crunch lab&PAF pro
Ibanez GRX40 - modified
Peavey Valveking 112 w/ 2x12 cab

Originally Posted by Shirate
The guitar, the only beautiful female that looks better with the top ON haha

Transformice
#4
The essence of the question is whether to learn something more your level, or something harder than you can play.

I think both has its merits. You are facing frustration with not being able to play a complete song. I say you sate that first by learning something more your level.

Having said that though, I'm a huge believer in progressing through learning songs that are juuuuust out of your reach. I'm not going to be able to play Miles of Machines any time soon, but that slightly shorter and easier Dream Theater song? Eh, sure. It'll take some time but it's possible.