#1
I have been thinking about this for a bit now, I actually have wanted to learn to play the 12 string guitar ever since I saw my old pastor playing one(aka before I started to even learn the basics of guitar).

Now that I feel I am decent at the 6 string guitar, I am thinking I am ready to start learning the 12 string.

How much different is it from the 6 string guitar? I am mostly worried about the tuning side of things to be honest, since I am still unable to tune by ear(mostly, getting better since I kind of have to tune the violin by ear).
#2
Quote by matthewzguitarz
...[ ]....How much different is it from the 6 string guitar?
Not really any different. There is a ton more string tension, and that makes it much harder to fret than any 6 string. So a proper setup is in order. With respect to playing lead lines. you can get the tones on the upper 2 strings, (unison), on the lower 4 octave pairs. It can be a bit disruptive when you cross from the G-3 to the B-2 as the octave sound suddenly goes away. So, some things you play could likely use a bit of creative re-engineering.
Quote by matthewzguitarz
I am mostly worried about the tuning side of things to be honest, since I am still unable to tune by ear(mostly, getting better since I kind of have to tune the violin by ear).
I still can't tune a 12 string without an electronic tuner. IMHO, "stroboscopic tuners" are the most effective for 12's, and that's what I use.

12 strings are best for playing with open chords. The string tension makes a lot of what can easily done on an electric, somewhat impractical. But then again, there are still players who can make it look easy. I know right, showoffs....
#3
I've had one on and off ever since I started playing. It isn't much different, but get one whose neck doesn't feel too clubby, use fairly light strings and have a good set up done.

FWIW, I played a Mexi Taylor 100 series 12 string - the 150? - a couple of weeks ago and thought it was terrific. Slim neck profile and good tone.
#4
As the guys say..... My own experience is limited, but back when I started playing the "folk" scene was still big and lots of entertainers used them extensively. Lightfoot, the Byrds, and of course the lads from Liverpool....

Again, mostly open-chord strumming for that nice, full, "orchestral" sound.

However, listen to Leo Kottke and John Fahey sometime. I read about a fellow in Guitar Player years back who was stretching the boundaries of the instrument... Did'nt tune the thing normally, for instance... All the strings were different. No unisons or octaves.
Played them all separately.....
#5
I bought a 12 string about 5 years ago and it's made me wish I'd bought one a lot earlier. As has been said, the 12 strings exert more tension - about 50% more than a 6 string with the same gauge. If you are planning to keep the guitar in standard E tuning I would go no higher than 11 gauge (I use 10 gauge) - for higher gauges I would recommend tuning down. When tuning use an electronic tuner - certainly to begin with - as you progress you will find it easier to tune by ear (actually, the slight differences in pitch between the strings - and there is always a slight difference - is why the 12 string guitar sounds like it does).

You will soon get used to playing it - fingers and brain adapt quickly. Go for it and enjoy.
#6
I have been playing a 12 string for many years and the most important thing stating out is not to be intimidated and don't buy a cheap one. Get a Seagull S12 if you can't afford a Taylor or a Guild. What ever you get make sure the action isn't too high or you will really frustrate yourself.
#7
Better you can find some best sources from online to study 12 string guitar. There are having easiest tips to study this guitar. so just surf on the online and choose a best tutorials for you. All the best!
#8
Yeah, rather save up and buy a good 12 string early on, it'll save you a lot of trouble in the long run. One of my favourite intruments actually. Have a look at some Washburns too, very good value for money.
#9
Quote by mielieHobo
. . . . . . Have a look at some Washburns too, very good value for money.


Yes indeed ^ ^ ^ ^ ^