#1
In your opinion is there a huge difference in quality between Gibson Les Paul's and Epi Paul's? Just wondering because of what seems to be such a huge difference in price. Would like to hear from those of you who own either Gibson or Epiphone.
Last edited by jrockz at Oct 25, 2014,
#2
I own both(a 2002 Epi LP standard, owned from new; a Gibson 60's LP Tribute and a Gibson LP classic).

In terms of build quality, all 3 are well built and comfortable to play. The 60's Tribute neck is a good bit heftier than the other 2, but I don't find it detracts from the playing 'experience'. The Epiphone did have some issues with the electronics 5 or 6 years ago(the switch became unreliable, and the pots sounded scratchy), so those got needed replaced. Not a big job - did it myself, mostly to see if I could.

Tonally, the Epiphone is different from the Gibsons(which are different from each other as well). Not in a way I'd consider bad, I simply find it's a little brighter.

All in all, while I do have a favourite(I usually use the Classic as a go-to, what edges it for me is the coil-split and boost circuit, so it's more versatile), YMMV. As always, try before you buy if at all possible, and if you're ordering online, consider paying a few extra $ to go with a retailer known to have a good returns policy, just in case.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#3
As if this wasn't a dead enough horse...

Seriously use the searchbar. There's hundreds of threads about this topic. Making a new thread on the same topic is straight up spam.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#5
It's like comparing a Seat Exeo and a 2007 Audi A4.

Sure, both subsidiaries are owned by the same company, and the models are similar and share a lot of parts... But in the end they're very different products, and they feel and perform differently.

It's up to you to decide if those differences justify the price gap, but it's undeniable they exist and that the more expensive model is nicer than the cheaper one.
Squier "VMC" Stratocaster
PRS SE Singlecut
tc electronic polytune
CMAT MODS Signa Drive
Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina
DIY gaussmarkov Dr. Boogey
EHX Small Clone
Mooer ShimVerb
DIY Beavis Devolt
T-REX Fuel Tank Chameleon
Ampeg GVT52-112
#6
The only way to decide which guitar is best for you is to get out there & play them. You may prefer the Epiphone, you may prefer the Gibson.

The other thing to consider, is are you buying a new guitar, or are you fulfilling the dream of Gibson ownership? If you're after the dream, an Epiphone will not fulfill your desire.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#7
If you can't notice any differences between the two save your money and buy an Epi. I understand the Tribute is a good all around LP with some good features including a HS Case.
Moving on.....
#8
Epi Les Paul Special IIs are one of the worst guitars I've ever played. Every time I bent the string upwards when playing it went a full two steps down out of tune. Epi Les Paul Standards and Standard Plustops are fantastic. Basically an import Gibson. If you got the money and want a fine guitar for you and your kids and your kid's kids, buy a Gibson. If you don't have the money and just want a nice guitar, go for the Epiphone. Both are great guitars but only the Gibson will increase in value.
#9
Both are great guitars but only the Gibson will increase in value.


Don't say this as if it were fact. No brand is guaranteed to appreciate in value.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
Thankfully there are a number of people on this forum who are not buying Gibson guitars because they will "be more valuable in the future". There are YouTube videos that I hate with people who pay huge amounts of money for 1958, 59 and 60 Les Paul's because they see them as some kind of investment. What a shame that any guitar of any kind is destined to sit virtually unplayed because someone sees it as an investment. It drives up prices for players who want a classic well-made and seasoned guitar to levels where normal everyday players can't afford them. If an Epiphone Les Paul (Standard modals and up) sounds and feels good to you save a few thousand dollars and buy one or two (hell with savings you can buy four or five). If money is not an issue buy a Gibson but do it because it's great guitar that you plan to play (hopefully a lot and for a long time). Don't do it because (maybe) it will be more valuable down the road.

Sorry. Don't want offend anyone. That's my personal opinion and I just have a bug about thoughts of any guitars "future value" being a motive to buy one.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Oct 29, 2014,
#11
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Don't say this as if it were fact. No brand is guaranteed to appreciate in value.


No financial advisor will tell you to invest in the used Gibson market <G>. Fact is, the outlook for vintage guitars long-term is a bit glum; there's a glut of them on the market and more coming out of collections as the Baby Boomers who bought them over the years retire and try to turn them into cash. Vintage dealers will tell you that even some $400K original '59 bursts have actually changed hands for nearer half that money.
#12
Quote by jrockz
In your opinion is there a huge difference in quality between Gibson Les Paul's and Epi Paul's? Just wondering because of what seems to be such a huge difference in price. Would like to hear from those of you who own either Gibson or Epiphone.


The only thing huge here is the number of threads that have dealt with this before.

An anecdote: yesterday I walked into the Pasadena Guitar Center with my Agile AL-3100 Floyd at the invitation of one of the sales guys there who had never seen one. Agile's close enough to an Epiphone's price range. The Agile was a $200 used purchase (new just under $500, I believe), black, with multi-layer binding on headstock and body and single binding on the fretboard. Fretboard is ebony with MOP trap inlays, 14" radius, jumbo frets.

The Floyd is from the same Korean production line as the OFRs that Gibson used in 2009.

The cheats: I'd had the guitar set up by Gary Brawer in San Francisco, with superglued frets and a PLEK job, and he put a aftermarket $35 big brass block on the Floyd. Frets were like glass, action is very low; it's one of my bar guitars.

On the wall at the GC are three Gibson Traditional Pro II with Floyd guitars (a black, a translucent wine red and some rimburst thing that's not very attractive). Medium frets ("27% lower"), 12" radius, rosewood fretboard, MOP trap inlays, OEM Floyd, no aftermarket setup. $2399 GC price tag.

Stock pickups on both. Both have a traditional clunky neck heel.

In every respect, the sales guys agreed that the Agile was the better guitar, both playing and sounding. None could find fault with either guitar visually.

But it "wasn't a Gibson."

For some people, that ranks as a "huge difference."
#13
Dspell, the ownership pride will always matter to folks.


The Impreza STI keeps up with a Lambo Murcielago on a 0-60 test, but one's not a Lambo.
#14
Quote by JustRooster
The Impreza STI keeps up with a Lambo Murcielago on a 0-60 test, but one's not a Lambo.
Yeah but they don't have the exact same 60 year old bodyshell style
#15
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Don't say this as if it were fact. No brand is guaranteed to appreciate in value.



Certainly agree, that being said Norlin era Gibsons are typically selling for 3-4X what they were purchased for new in the 70's. Part of that is from being considered Vintage age and part of that is just inflation.
If inflation increases again (hopefully not like it did back then) then there's a good chance the guitar will at least hold a god portion of its value over many years if well maintained.
As for Original Bursts, they did peak quite high, but there are only so many left so examples with less than spectacular tops, or major repairs or just non-original content examples will probably fall the most. The cherries though will still command some pretty high prices.
#16
Quote by KenG
Certainly agree, that being said Norlin era Gibsons are typically selling for 3-4X what they were purchased for new in the 70's. Part of that is from being considered Vintage age and part of that is just inflation.


I bought a house in July of 1977 for $36,500. Sold it in early 1980 for $80,000, and the buyer was willing to accept a 20% variable mortgage on the silly thing. Inflation was definitely an issue at the time. Same house these days has been in the $350K-$400K range for the last couple of years. By that measure, the Gibsons really didn't do all that well. And not *all* Gibsons did great; the L6S of that era can be found for well under $1000.
#17
Buy a used Epiphone Les Paul with good frets. Gut the electronics and replace it with alpha pots and your favorite pickups. Replace the nut with a Tusq XL nut and the tuners with Jin Ho locking tuners. You now have a better guitar than you’ll get from Gibson for less than $2,000 and you’ve probably spent less than $800.
#18
Get the Epiphone 1960 Tribute Plus with real Gibson classic 57 pups, Switchcraft three way switch and input, Grover locking tuners, CTI pots and Mallory tone caps, solid mahogany body and full maple cap with an included harshell case. This comes standard on this so and you'll spend $600-700.00 new with no additional work. I got one earlier this year and it is my current favorite guitar for most gigs. Great feel and sound.
#19
Quote by JustRooster
Dspell, the ownership pride will always matter to folks.


The Impreza STI keeps up with a Lambo Murcielago on a 0-60 test, but one's not a Lambo.


Plus it's the ultimate chavmobile. I'm somewhere in the middle with my ST but that thing just attracts track suits.
#21
I just had a mental vision of a masked "superhero" dressed in a track suit, driving one of those...

Chav-man...with his Chavmobile, Chavarangs, and so forth.
#22
Quote by JustRooster
Dspell, the ownership pride will always matter to folks.


The Impreza STI keeps up with a Lambo Murcielago on a 0-60 test, but one's not a Lambo.


And with the current pricing structure, continuing the Lamborghini/Impreza simile, the average Joe will probably only ever have a chance to own one of them...and it won't be the Lamborghini.