#1
Any tips on learning to shred? I have always use alternate picking and I am very relaxed using this technique but I want to play really fast so I can shred in my solos , Also what do people think about using the chromatic scale for practice or should I stick to scales and notes that I will use when playing solos? .
#2
There is no secret to "shredding". Practising the chromatic scale wont do anything. If you want to "shred" then you have to practice. Speed comes from accuracy, and accuracy comes with time and effective practice.
The best thing for you to practice would be solo's that are a decent challenge. Don't practice something you can't play. Set yourself small challenges and keep doing it over and over and over and over and over and over and over. In time you'll improve, but don't expect it to happen in a few weeks, or months or likely even years. Speed is a very gradual process.

Also, practising scales wont do anything. Beginners have a serious misconception that scales are a key to speed and success and it's nothing like that. Play solo's you enjoy and music you would like to see yourself playing. If you want to play Metallica solo's, you play lots and lots and lots of thrash metal. Same goes for any other genre, whether it be jazz, bluegrass, funk etc etc. Practise the style of music you want to play, and ignore scales and pointless exercises for now. They have their purpose, but they're not the right purpose in your situation.
Last edited by vayne92 at Oct 25, 2014,
#3
Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina is an awesome resource for developing your chops. It has tons of exercises that will challenge your finger control, independence, etc. As vayne said, it all comes down to accuracy. To get faster, most people need to first slow down. Train your fingers to move perfectly, not just "good enough," at slow speeds. Then gradually increase the speed.
#4
Quote by mctriple
Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina is an awesome resource for developing your chops. It has tons of exercises that will challenge your finger control, independence, etc. As vayne said, it all comes down to accuracy. To get faster, most people need to first slow down. Train your fingers to move perfectly, not just "good enough," at slow speeds. Then gradually increase the speed.


+1
#5
+1

and also what vayne said
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#6
Quote by vayne92
There is no secret to "shredding". Practising the chromatic scale wont do anything. If you want to "shred" then you have to practice. Speed comes from accuracy, and accuracy comes with time and effective practice.
The best thing for you to practice would be solo's that are a decent challenge. Don't practice something you can't play. Set yourself small challenges and keep doing it over and over and over and over and over and over and over. In time you'll improve, but don't expect it to happen in a few weeks, or months or likely even years. Speed is a very gradual process.


I wouldnt call speed a slow process, depends how much you practice. I got from not being able to alternate pick being able to play 14.66 notes per second accurately within 6 months, which is my top speed without getting too sloppy. I would say it takes years to play complex shredd patterns, sweeping taping and combining these techniques tofether but, it only takes months practicing 1 to 5 hours a day to be able to shredd accurately to up to 100bpm 16th notea. Also didnt have a teacher, hes taught me most I need to know sackes and all heory bad habbits. Shredd I think is easyto learn by yourself if you know how to do it. Im 16 yearsold too.
I think he best advice I can give is patience, and play really slow with a metronome and slowly speed up, l agree with this guy, learn solos and challenge yourself. Get rid of bad habbits like playing as damn fast as you can, play as fast and accurate and dontwaste your energy going faster.
the other great advice I can give you is to warm up before playing fast. I mean atleast 5 minutes of stretching then 10minutes playing slow chromatic stuff maybe. Dont do what I did. Played hours I didnt warm up, overplayed. Right now I have tendonisitis, im not going to play this week. Its painfull, not physically but lookig at my guitars on my bed......but not getting fingered and screaming

6months ok not lying, another thing is maybe I am talented or gifted at guitar, I dunno, further challenge yourself with 2 notes per string too, its harder but nice sound
Last edited by viperzz33 at Oct 30, 2014,
#7
Quote by viperzz33
I got from not being able to alternate pick being able to play 14.66 notes per second accurately within 6 months


but, it only takes months practicing 1 to 5 hours a day to be able to shredd accurately to up to 100bpm 16th notea


These two quotes you posted in the same paragraph argue with each other.

For anyone reading this thread, you will not pick 14.66 notes per second (220bpm 16ths) accurately within 6 months (excluding possibly tremolo picking which does not really mean shit in shred). 100bpm 16ths is much more possible.

I'm not going argue this topic again since we just had it last week (so if you want to know why check my post history or something) but you do not go from not being able to alternate pick at all to 220bpm 16ths in 6 months. It just does not happen.

From all accounts of people who actually posted technique videos of their progress, speed is indeed a very slow process and people who claim to get a lot of speed quickly generally are playing very sloppily and/or entirely incorrectly.
#8
Quote by viperzz33
I wouldnt call speed a slow process, depends how much you practice. I got from not being able to alternate pick being able to play 14.66 notes per second accurately within 6 months, which is my top speed without getting too sloppy. I would say it takes years to play complex shredd patterns, sweeping taping and combining these techniques tofether but, it only takes months practicing 1 to 5 hours a day to be able to shredd accurately to up to 100bpm 16th notea. Also didnt have a teacher, hes taught me most I need to know sackes and all heory bad habbits. Shredd I think is easyto learn by yourself if you know how to do it. Im 16 yearsold too.
I think he best advice I can give is patience, and play really slow with a metronome and slowly speed up, l agree with this guy, learn solos and challenge yourself. Get rid of bad habbits like playing as damn fast as you can, play as fast and accurate and dontwaste your energy going faster.
the other great advice I can give you is to warm up before playing fast. I mean atleast 5 minutes of stretching then 10minutes playing slow chromatic stuff maybe. Dont do what I did. Played hours I didnt warm up, overplayed. Right now I have tendonisitis, im not going to play this week. Its painfull, not physically but lookig at my guitars on my bed......but not getting fingered and screaming

6months ok not lying, another thing is maybe I am talented or gifted at guitar, I dunno, further challenge yourself with 2 notes per string too, its harder but nice sound



Wtf troll? How did you go from not being able to alternate pick to being able to play at 200+ BPM in 6 months? I would believe you if you were hitting 130-140 BPM at 16ths, but what you've posted is crazy...
#9
Ive been playing guitar for 4 years now, left hand has always been quick since well I dunno, but my right hand, I never picked up, well hardly. Im asian, filipino actualy, but thats stereo typing. Im an INTP in the myers briggs, my IQ is 135 or something like that, I a perfectionist, I played guitar on average 2 hours a day. There is no way to convince you guys unless I get a vid, which I will maybe next week got tendonisitis, the top of my hand is sore and has swollen veins, which is drivig me nuts.
wait lets do some maths here you guys got me confused. I play 8 notes a beat on 110bpm thats my top speed
#10
I most accurate though at 6 and will always be accurate at 6 notes a beat at 110bpm, its my co fortable speed, 8 notes a bit harder and any faster than 110 at that speed I get inaccurate
#12
Try these 3 steps for shreds.
01. Picking Hand: Three-Minute Picking Technique

This straightforward exercise is broken into two sections: First, perform a series of eighth-note downstrokes in rhythm, at a speed that is comfortable to you, for a period of three straight minutes. Follow this by performing a series of eighth-notes in rhythm using alternate picking — a downstroke followed by an upstroke — at the same speed for the full three minutes. Performing these simple exercises each for the full three minutes allows you to develop your stamina and rhythm abilities, meanwhile developing valuable muscle memory in your picking hand.
02. Fretting Hand: Strength Exercises

The next step is a set of legato exercises in which you are utilizing all of the finger combinations in a few groups. These exercises require no picking at all, and are purely legato. They involve a series of hammer-ons and pull-offs performed as hard and fast as you can maintain for 15 seconds at a time. If done correctly, you will really feel this exercise in your fretting hand, wrist and forearm. Once again, it is advisable stretch your hands, wrists and arms before beginning these exercises.
03. Both Hands: Symmetrical Exercise

Finally, I recommend closing with a straightforward synchronization exercise that is fairly common, but is important to do it correctly and do it consistently. This dexterity exercise uses your hands together to play each fretting finger across four frets to ascend and descend the strings across the neck.
#13
Another adviceni can give is to practice with music, a backi track, my teacher always tole me to pracyice with music, but I didnt when I got into technicality, butnim doing it now, its qise to use a metronome for synchronization so instead of a metronome, it will ge good to play along a music with similar tempo andnpractice ur speed there maybe and while doing that u are also training ur improvising skills and maybe train your ear.