#1
Hi,

I set out to learn some songs by ear. Even though I started with some relatively easy ones, it's a slooooooooow process of trial and error for me and in the end I'm not even sure that I've made an accurate transcription.

Is there a software application that would detect and show me the chords and notes in mp3?
Of course I don't expect it to tab songs out for me, but some pointers or reassurement would be great at times when I'm pondering whether I'm tone deaf or not

Thanks,
j
#2
There's no shortcut. Learn the rudiments of music theory and when you listen, you'll hear the relationships between the notes and chords within a key. The more you know the easier it all gets
#3
Using software called Transcribe helps a little. Slowing down songs makes it a lot easier.
#4
Do you know how to read music?

Back when I didn't know how, I'd load the guitar pro tabs up but hide the tabs so I could slow down passages or change instruments (guitars drowned in distortion isn't always the easiest thing, especially when you're still developing your ear).

Doing some ear training will help though. If you can take the time, jump on over to musictheory.net and check out the ear training exercises.

I'd start with the interval and chord identifications, then move on to scales. You can change what it's exercising you with, so you can certainly start small (i.e. the differences between a tritone, major 3rd, Perfect 5th, and Perfect 4th would be a fantastic place to start in the interval section!)

Anyway, try it out. It's actually kind of fun. I made it part of my daily routine at 15 minutes of each. It gets addicting though. You look at the clock and you've been IDing chords for 45 minutes lol. It helped me out a lot though Good luck!
#5
Thank you all for the replies Right now I'm using Amazing Slow Downer for slowing things down.

To mjones1992:
I can read music, but the guitar pro idea sounds like a really good idea anyway for ear training, I just have to force myself not look at the score. It's good, as I can check myself in the end, so I can verify whether my transcriptions were correct or not. Thanks again, I will also check musictheory.net

j
#7
Transcribe will help you, as it can (sort of) identify notes and chords for you, although you'll find that it is no replacement for your ear.
#8
Quote by HotspurJr
Transcribe will help you, as it can (sort of) identify notes and chords for you, although you'll find that it is no replacement for your ear.


I use Transcribe a lot. Great tool.