#1
Could some extremely knowledgeable person post a menu of general things that a beginner must know and must be adept at executing on an electric guitar?
Also, could such a menu be posted for intermediate players?
#2
justinguitar has a beginner and intermediate course. it's free (though he accepts donations if you can afford it), and seems to be pretty good, so that'd probably be worth a look.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Guitar doesn't quite work like that.. learn what you want to learn.
#4
Quote by vayne92
Guitar doesn't quite work like that.. learn what you want to learn.

In a way, I'm glad guitar learning doesn't work like that.
Seems I may be able to focus more on exactly how I want to sound, and achieve that more quickly, without becoming burned out.
#5
Here's a quick list:

1) ensure you're guitar is properly setup - intonation, tuning and proper action is crucial!!!!!
2) it's not enough to simply play a note or chord - you need to play it "in tune" - this means applying the right amount of pressure for notes and chords. Too much pressure will detune the notes.
3) dampening (muting) notes you are not playing is absolutely crucial to playing well.
4) learning by ear is crucial to developing musicality and will make creation and improvisation more intuitive.
5) start creating and improvising right away and have fun on the instrument. Explore everything you learn. If you've only learnt three chords - try writing a song with those chords. Creation is a skill that must be practiced -the sooner you start, the better you will be.
6) Jam with the records.
7) practice basic beat subdivision with a metronome. Practice switching from quarter notes to triplets to eight notes etc.
8) learn the major scale and learn how chords are constructed from its intervals.
9) learn basic chord progression theory ( ii,v,i etc.)
10) find people to jam with
#6
Quote by reverb66
Here's a quick list:

1) ensure you're guitar is properly setup - intonation, tuning and proper action is crucial!!!!!
2) it's not enough to simply play a note or chord - you need to play it "in tune" - this means applying the right amount of pressure for notes and chords. Too much pressure will detune the notes.
3) dampening (muting) notes you are not playing is absolutely crucial to playing well.
4) learning by ear is crucial to developing musicality and will make creation and improvisation more intuitive.
5) start creating and improvising right away and have fun on the instrument. Explore everything you learn. If you've only learnt three chords - try writing a song with those chords. Creation is a skill that must be practiced -the sooner you start, the better you will be.
6) Jam with the records.
7) practice basic beat subdivision with a metronome. Practice switching from quarter notes to triplets to eight notes etc.
8) learn the major scale and learn how chords are constructed from its intervals.
9) learn basic chord progression theory ( ii,v,i etc.)
10) find people to jam with

#5 is especially good advice. I think my biggest enemy has been, well, other than all the OT I've had to work, was that I was loathe to stop, and learn something new, which meant I had to spend more time pondering, and less time playing. Looked up a vid describing arpeggios, and when I saw a diagram the instructor had drawn, I just went cold to the idea, and went right on back to practicing minor pent. in the key of Am.
#7
Quote by reverb66
Here's a quick list:

1) ensure you're guitar is properly setup - intonation, tuning and proper action is crucial!!!!!


But 99% of guitarists don't do this; and 99% of retailers don't do it either!
#8
Quote by vayne92
Guitar doesn't quite work like that.. learn what you want to learn.


I agree absolutely with learning what you want to learn (it's what I did myself, and still do), but at the same time there probably are a few basics which are handy if not almost essential to know, and which the justinguitar site will cover.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
At the start learn whatever you want, wait until you're comfortable and able to play the instrument and then after a few months or maybe even a year take a look at the things you should know but it also depends on how serious you are about playing, if you want to be in bands and whatnot then there's things you need to know and learn but if you just want to play at home for your family and friends then you don't really have to learn to learn any of that stuff but at the start just play and learn what you want to
"Music Without Emotion Is Like Food Without Flavour"
Paul Gilbert
#10
I think it's a good idea to be familiar with the instrument itself; what the various bits are called, how they are constructed, that sort of thing.
Then you won't make posts like:
"The whatchacallit where the wire wraps around the thingy on the part you hold is broke!"

I was one of those folks who wanted to know EVERYTHING... I read histories of the guitar, read Guitar PLayer cover-to-cover each month... Even the bits I wasn't really interested in.
#11
I'd say at the bare minimum to be able to restring it yourself.After that just go where your journey takes you.
#13
1.learn all major chords
2. Learn major strumming patterns
3. Learn to play full songs strumming
5. Learn plucking and pluck thise songs instead of strumming
6. Learn to read tabs
7. Learn simple songs with tabs like your beautiful
8. Keep practicing tabs and easy songs
9. Learn a song with nice plucking and slow solo like nothing else matters
10. Practice more songs
11. Learn a harder solo and song like stairway to heaven
12. Learn more harder solos and songs
13. Learn the pentatonic scale from the first fret to the 12 fret
14. Improvise
15. Learn cool licks and use it in improvisation
16. learn harder songs like comfortably numb
17. create your own riffs
18.create your own song
19. Create your first solo
20. Listen to a variety of music
21. Decide your style you want to follow I suppose
22. Learn the whole minor scale and learn its modes
23. Try to get out the box position if younare
24. Learn theory, crucial
25. learn different scales, ones you will use
26. Be creative with these new knowledge
27. Learn alternate picking, may take 3 to 6 months to be able to shredd prerably learn 3 notes per string shredd
28. Get accurate and faster, first sync your hand, play slow with metronome, use thick pick up to 1.5mill, try jaz3
27. practice the other skills you must have learnt earlier, legato, bending, vibrato, sliding and perfect them
28. Learn a song with faster solo like sweet child of mine
29. Learn sweeping, may take a few weeks to months to do it accurate enough to sweeping
30. Dont five hese technical skills are hard, but keep practicing
31. Be more creative and write a song that is more complex with these new techniques
32. Kearna hard solo, like afterlife
33. Keep practicig your alternate picking and keep building your lick library
34. Perfect it, once fast, lesrn accuracy more
35. Learn economy pickig, optional
36. You be fairly good by now, this process could take a year to 3 years depending how dedicated you are
37. Form a band, optional
38. Get practicing !!!!!!!!!! Remember speed is not everything though, you need to play with your soul and melody
39. Dont overplay, always warm up and stretch through the day
40. Make sure you arent pressing strings too hard or holdin pick too tight
Thanks!!!!
#14
Something I'd like to add, while you might not ever need it, is to learn to read from the staff. There have been many times playing with my friend where I was incredibly thankful for my instructor making me learn it.
#15
The most important thing you can do is play! Pick up your guitar and start playing notes and chords together without thinking about what you are doing or stopping for mistakes. Try to recreate a melody you heard earlier in the day or find the notes and chords that express your current mood. Play along with and learn songs that you normally wouldn’t listen to. Put on a symphony or concerto and learn how to play a clarinet solo on your guitar. Mute the sound on your tv and try to compose music to fit the images and stories shown. Inspiration for your playing can be drawn from virtually anything, and challenging yourself to use your guitar in new ways will greatly improve proficiency. At this stage, playing from your heart can be just as important as what your hands are doing and what knowledge and theory you are drawing from while you strum the strings. One of the most important things you can do is play with other people. Find friends who also play instruments and learn some songs together, jam and improvise some melodies, and draw inspiration from each other.
#16
Quote by viperzz33
1.learn all major chords
2. Learn major strumming patterns
3. Learn to play full songs strumming
5. Learn plucking and pluck thise songs instead of strumming
6. Learn to read tabs
7. Learn simple songs with tabs like your beautiful
8. Keep practicing tabs and easy songs
9. Learn a song with nice plucking and slow solo like nothing else matters
10. Practice more songs
11. Learn a harder solo and song like stairway to heaven
12. Learn more harder solos and songs
13. Learn the pentatonic scale from the first fret to the 12 fret
14. Improvise
15. Learn cool licks and use it in improvisation
16. learn harder songs like comfortably numb
17. create your own riffs
18.create your own song
19. Create your first solo
20. Listen to a variety of music
21. Decide your style you want to follow I suppose
22. Learn the whole minor scale and learn its modes
23. Try to get out the box position if younare
24. Learn theory, crucial
25. learn different scales, ones you will use
26. Be creative with these new knowledge
27. Learn alternate picking, may take 3 to 6 months to be able to shredd prerably learn 3 notes per string shredd
28. Get accurate and faster, first sync your hand, play slow with metronome, use thick pick up to 1.5mill, try jaz3
27. practice the other skills you must have learnt earlier, legato, bending, vibrato, sliding and perfect them
28. Learn a song with faster solo like sweet child of mine
29. Learn sweeping, may take a few weeks to months to do it accurate enough to sweeping
30. Dont five hese technical skills are hard, but keep practicing
31. Be more creative and write a song that is more complex with these new techniques
32. Kearna hard solo, like afterlife
33. Keep practicig your alternate picking and keep building your lick library
34. Perfect it, once fast, lesrn accuracy more
35. Learn economy pickig, optional
36. You be fairly good by now, this process could take a year to 3 years depending how dedicated you are
37. Form a band, optional
38. Get practicing !!!!!!!!!! Remember speed is not everything though, you need to play with your soul and melody
39. Dont overplay, always warm up and stretch through the day
40. Make sure you arent pressing strings too hard or holdin pick too tight
Thanks!!!!

I've just surpassed my one year anniversary in playing (pointing n' plinking) on guitar...and I've done so in a robotic fashion. Hence: boredom. I'm most excited when I take a simple melody and improvise on it, or attempt to write tab for popular songs.
I am looking forward to learning more scales, however. Got really enthusiastic this a.m. when I was playing the pentatonic scale in Am, and realized that it sounded a lot like the solo in Natalie Merchant's, "Carnival". Hot. Hot. Hot.
Last edited by pointnplink at Dec 8, 2014,