#1
Would thicker strings cause muddier (worse) distortion on cheap practice amps ?
Would dropped tunnings be too heavy for bad amps ?
#2
I guess it could make it sound muddy, I'm not sure though!
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#3
I'd expect the opposite -- I thought thicker strings increased the tension, so they should tighten up the distortion when compared to thinner strings in the same tuning.
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#4
Too many variables at play to give a definitive answer.
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#5
Quote by Linkerman
I'd expect the opposite -- I thought thicker strings increased the tension, so they should tighten up the distortion when compared to thinner strings in the same tuning.


Yeah, this. I would think they would make less mud.
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#6
Quote by DeathmoniC
Would thicker strings cause muddier (worse) distortion on cheap practice amps ?
Would dropped tunnings be too heavy for bad amps ?


What's YOUR best guess?
#7
Based on experience yes a shitty amp (solid state under 40-50w) will almost invariably cause a yucky flubby tone in heavier drop tunings. They often lack the ability to clearly articulate those frequencies like a tube amp can, but the pickups will make a much bigger difference in that than strings
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#8
Quote by dspellman
What's YOUR best guess?


I think they'd cause a less muddier dist since they won't vibrate that much
#9
Quote by DeathmoniC
I think they'd cause a less muddier dist since they won't vibrate that much

That's assuming you are sticking with the same tuning.
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#10
Quote by Linkerman
I'd expect the opposite -- I thought thicker strings increased the tension, so they should tighten up the distortion when compared to thinner strings in the same tuning.

This is pretty much my experience, and it also tends to sound better with clean on cheaper amps. I generally believe that for metal heavier bottom strings are definitely your friend - better tuning stability, more clarity, and just more comfortable to play when picking aggressively. And it's not like more tension on bottom strings, besides extreme cases, makes it harder to play on an electric (top strings are a different story entirely, these damn things feel like blades when very tense).

As for the amps, that really depends what tone you're going for I think. If you like that uber-high-gain chainsaw tone (which I'm not a fan of) it's achievable with a decent pedal, but if you like something cleaner and beefier it can be a pain in the ass on a bad amp.
Last edited by TheLiberation at Oct 28, 2014,
#11
If the heavier gauge strings add bass and the amp / speaker can't handle it, yes it would add to muddy tone. Dropped tuning will also do it with a speaker that doesn't handle lows well. Lots of variables but overall, anything that increases the lows in your instrument tone will muddy up a cheap amp because cheap amps aren't built for extreme playing. I would suggest setting up the guitar for what is most comfortable and suits the playing style you like, then taking the guitar to a friends house or store where you can plug into some better amps to hear the guitar untainted by a cheap speaker / amp and see how it performs. Then at the very least you know where the problem lies and can best address the corrections you need for a good tone as affordable as possible. String changes to heavier gauge may also require setting up the nut for the heavier string gauge to avoid tuning issues and then letting the guitar settle for possible truss rod adjustments as well as string distance from pickups to avoid flub from oscillation of strings being too close to pickups.
Last edited by AWG42N43 at Oct 28, 2014,