#1
Hello, I have been playing guitar for about 6 months from now. I can play some songs, but I don't feel that I actual know how to play. For now, I just now which strings/chords to play and thats it. I just try to master them, but for example if someone says : "Cmon, play this..." I know melody and something like that, but have no idea what to play. Maybe you can suggest me some exercises or ways to learn actually to know guitar, not only be able to play songs?
#2
First and foremost keep doing what you're doing. I know exactly how you feel and that feeling only goes away with more and more practice and exposure to guitars and music. I've been playing for 16 years and have days where I feel like I'm no good/worse than I should be/have no clue about music. It's a life long battle so just enjoy the journey. Take pride in your progress so far and keep on rocking.
Guitars:
EVH Wolfgang Special LH
Gibson Les Paul Studio 2013
Ibanez EW20LASE-NT LH

Effects:
BOSS GT-100

Amps:
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 410
Laney IRT Studio + 112 cab
#3
Study music theory.

Buy a college level music theory book. Don't buy anything geared towards just guitar. Music theory is applicable to all melodic and harmonic instruments.

Knowing how and why chords and melodies nicely together will help you.
#4
I'm coming up on 3 years. Every few months I have an epiphany and make some serious progress, then sometimes it's a struggle to pick it up for a half hour a day.

Keep going, you'll get better.

There are no shortcuts, I don't care who tries to tell you there are, even if they have a simpler technique that works for you, you're going to have to practice the hell out of it.

Buy a game like rocksmith. It will help make tedious repetition into a game. Scales are boring without a police chase and a score, but they will do wonders for your ability to play lead.

Get a competent teacher. Someone who not only knows how to play the guitar, but someone who knows how to teach. I lucked out with a woman who had been a foreign language teacher for 40 years and had been playing guitar for 60.

Find the music you enjoy, not necessarily the music you enjoy listening to, but the music that you enjoy playing. I started out playing more rock and country, now I just love the feeling of playing the blues.

Cut yourself some slack. You are not going to bypass the learning part. You will have to put the time in, and you are not competing with anyone but you.

Take all that for what it cost you.
Last edited by seabear70 at Oct 28, 2014,
#5
Here's the thing; it's not about how much you know or how fast you can play. It's about how you are playing what you are playing, the physical mechanics of the strings ringing needs to be pleasant sounding.

If you can get the guitar to sing properly then motivation and inspiration is no issue. My advice is number one practice 30 minutes every day atleast, never stop for a day. Number two learn part of a song every day, always be learning new music that you can't play easily. When you are constantly learning new sounds it's easy to improve and play the instrument with feeling.
#6
Quote by farcry
Here's the thing; it's not about how much you know or how fast you can play. It's about how you are playing what you are playing, the physical mechanics of the strings ringing needs to be pleasant sounding.

If you can get the guitar to sing properly then motivation and inspiration is no issue. My advice is number one practice 30 minutes every day atleast, never stop for a day. Number two learn part of a song every day, always be learning new music that you can't play easily. When you are constantly learning new sounds it's easy to improve and play the instrument with feeling.


Absolutely.

I'd add to this that you want to listen out for people phrase their melodies, or parts of solos. Phrasing just means the way they lay out the notes in time (where they start, stop, how long they are). Listen to tunes with this perspective, and you'll see over and over that the phrase is often repeated the same or similar, but the note choice varies. It's worth building a small library of phrases that you can then add your own touches too with your own note choices.

I'd also add learn theory as relates to what you style you want to play ... this may give many more ideas for what you can play (scales, chords, arpeggios) against what (backing chords), and also how to create more melodic ideas. The theory-side is probably best done with someone that understands it and can explain (ultimately theory explain pitch relationships with each other). So, as you learn a tune, if you can understand where the chords come from, where the scale(s) come from, this is all more grist for the mill. But I suggest you don't just learn theory by yourself, and just for the sake of it, without knowing how to apply it.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Oct 29, 2014,