#1
Hello,

Anyone tune their 26, 27, 28" scale guitars to standard tuning (NOT E to E an octave below).? How would you describe the feel and sound of the guitar with that setup?
#2
I do something close to that. I tune my (cheap OLP, with SD Jazz pickups) 30" bari to open D with 13-56 strings for playing slide. It is the best-sounding electric I have, a lot of "zing", like wind blowing through telegraph wires. The feel is very tight, and I think I should be wearing safety glasses while plying it. I like it so much I've been wondering about a bari acoustic tuned to standard or open D with skinny strings. The long scale could be hard work if you play low on the neck, but if you play mostly on the high frets it could have its advantages.
#3
I have my Yamaha RGX TT D6 (26 1/4" scale) tuned to drop D, 52-10 strings. I'm really liking the feel of it. I can really dig in on it for heavier riffage and rhythm playing with reduced string flub. Sounds real nice strumming with clean tones as well.
I'll agree with Tony about the longer scale making it a bit more work in the lower register, but in the upper register, it's a dream to play.
Granted my Yamaha is only a 26 1/4" scale, it is noticeable when I play it, I don't have long fingers , but it's just right for me. I'm thinking of getting another for lower tunings.
#4
Quote by Always-Ben

Anyone tune their 26, 27, 28" scale guitars to standard tuning (NOT E to E an octave below).? How would you describe the feel and sound of the guitar with that setup?


You should probably have included this in the other thread you already have going on the topic.

If you're used to a 25.5" guitar tuned standard and you move to a 27" tuned standard, you're not going to notice a lot of difference, but there will be some. In fact, it will be very much like moving from a 24.75" to a 25.5" scale. The differences will be in the details: it's somewhat harder to bend, you have a bit more stretch to your chording, the lower strings will sound a bit more "piano-like." The real benefit will be in the upper fret area, where you have more room to work with, especially if you have large hands.