#1
Right now im trying to study sweep picking from guys like Jason Becker and Jeff Lommis. My problem right now is not really the technique itself but using it when soloing. Like I notice that they tend to switch patterns when chaging chords. So is this how you would want to play sweeping pattern. For example if your playing an amaj chord play an amaj pattern. But that leads to my other problem if youre just playing over a riff or a bunch of power chords can you just go over any sweep patterns that you feels sounds right. I hope you understand my question. Thanks!
#3
Just figure out how different guitarists use the technique.

You can do whatever you want. But power chords do also have functions. You can play the same progression with power chords or with major/minor chords. You just need to figure out which of the chords are major and which are minor. Just use your ears. There are no rules.

If the chord is A5 chord, you could of course play A major arpeggio. But sometimes it doesn't fit the sound of the song. So play an A minor arpeggio and see if it fits better. You could also try suspended chords, add chords, 7th chords, extended chords. It doesn't always have to be major or minor triads. Experiment.

But I think the best way to learn this is to figure out how your favorite guitarists use sweep picking.
#4
Quote by Patsfan1281
Right now im trying to study sweep picking from guys like Jason Becker and Jeff Lommis. My problem right now is not really the technique itself but using it when soloing. Like I notice that they tend to switch patterns when chaging chords. So is this how you would want to play sweeping pattern. For example if your playing an amaj chord play an amaj pattern. But that leads to my other problem if youre just playing over a riff or a bunch of power chords can you just go over any sweep patterns that you feels sounds right. I hope you understand my question. Thanks!


The basic idea is that you sweep :

1) the actual chord being played ( such as A minor) - with or without diatonic or non diatonic passing tones

2) a suitable version of the chord being played with an added note(s) or removed note(s) ( A minor 7, A minor 9 etc.)

3) a chord that harmonizes the chord being played ( C major 7 over A minor) - there is some overlap here with point 2

4) a series of chords (ascending, descending, 5ths, 4ths whatever) that works over the chord being played.

5) diminished or augmented or chromatic gibberish (i.e. passing chords)


Generally if a riff is comprised of a "bunch of power chords" it is probably outlining a certain key - so just work within that - you don't need to sweep a new chord over each power chord, but rather work with a sweep that will sound good over the series of power chords. For example, if you have a riff in the key of A minor that's bouncing around power chords, then simply sweeping the A Minor chord will probably sound decent, as will a Minor 9 etc. If you're curious as to what will work in these scenarios - just play a chord and let it ring out over the progression - if it works like that, it'll sound decent sweeped.