#1
With all the sexual explicit songs out there these days, I want to try and start a discussion about kids listening to songs like:

Robin Thicke - Blurred Lines
Jessie J - Bang Bang
Nicky Minaj - Anaconda

You know. the songs purely about sex.
Everybody lately seems to be so worried about these songs having an influence on kids.

When I was a kid, I used to listen to songs like "T-Spoon - Sex on the Beach" for example.
But to me that song, as direct as it is, didn't mean much.
It was just a fun song to dance and sing to. Lyrics didn't matter to me at all, and I didn't even know what they meant. Granted, I'm dutch so my english isn't/wasn't good at all.

But I feel like people that are so worried about kids these days are overthinking a lot of things.

What do you people think?
#3
One of the funniest things during elementary school was singing 'We will, we will **** you' during recess. The lyrics of a song didn't have to be filthy for us to make them so.

There have always been songs about sex, the main thing that has changed is that it's become much more obvious in the lyrics.
Just take any 90s pop song, chances are it's about sex.

I think it's more likely that the songs (or more specifically the lyrics) and the appreciation for them stem from a misguided view on sexuality, rather than the other way around. Kids who don't have someone to educate them, could be negatively influenced by the songs, but they're also the kids who could get negatively influenced by pretty much anything else.
#7
Only sexual songs I remember listening to as a kid were i like big butts and the thong song. No one listened to them seriously though, our immature selves would laugh and giggle at them.
#10
Quote by ultimate-slash
One of the funniest things during elementary school was singing 'We will, we will **** you' during recess. The lyrics of a song didn't have to be filthy for us to make them so.

There have always been songs about sex, the main thing that has changed is that it's become much more obvious in the lyrics.
Just take any 90s pop song, chances are it's about sex.

I think it's more likely that the songs (or more specifically the lyrics) and the appreciation for them stem from a misguided view on sexuality, rather than the other way around. Kids who don't have someone to educate them, could be negatively influenced by the songs, but they're also the kids who could get negatively influenced by pretty much anything else.


That's not really all that new.
Take Led Zeppelin's Heartbreaker and Whole Lotta Love.
Those lyrics aren't exactly subtle or cryptic about sex.
#11
Quote by CodeMonk
That's not really all that new.
Take Led Zeppelin's Heartbreaker and Whole Lotta Love.
Those lyrics aren't exactly subtle or cryptic about sex.



but what does he mean when he says 'im gonna give you every inch of my love'?
#13
He's giving her a red plastic valentine's day ruler so she can be competitive with the Chinese at geometry
#14
Welcome to the popular music industry. Sex sells. Simple, upbeat music sells. Big names sell. Get over it and listen to what you like. There's enough music in the world for everyone.
#15
These are hardly the things that have bad influence on kids nowadays if ya ask me.

If ya ask me, the main problem nowadays is that it has become cool for kids to be superficial and futile, with all them tv series (here in italy at least) and partly music videos and partly celebrities (Taylor Swift's the first one that comes to my mind) promoting that attitude.

Explicit music has always been there anyway.
#17
The lyrical content isn't really that much different. Sure, I've noticed there's a lot more sexual lyrics on the radio these days and every other word is a euphemism for "bangin dat skanky hoe", but it's not like it didn't exist back in the day either.
I think that most people will agree though that 'Whole lotta love' did it a lot more tastefully than 'Anaconda'.

It's the videos that I seem to think are the worst part. I can't really name any music videos from way back when that I would really consider too sexually explicit aside from maybe some suggestive clothing and maybe a winky face.
Now I can turn on the TV to almost any music channel and be guaranteed to have a selection of different women in next to no clothing's shaking their arse around and caressing anything that can sort of vaguely be described as a penis.
#19
Quote by link no1
I think that most people will agree though that 'Whole lotta love' did it a lot more tastefully than 'Anaconda'.

god no
#20
I'd say that the sexualization of the music industry is kinda cool in some ways. I mean, look at how censored the film industry is compared...

Sexy music videos are a representative expression on our culture. Some people wont like to admit it, but we as humans ****ing love sex. Deep down we have the urge and sleezy imagination but most of the time we try really hard to suppress what we want.

When it comes to kids, half the time I don't think even most adults even pay any attention to lyrics and therefore meaning but more the melodic sound. Think of it like a non english speaker listening to Anaconda, they wont really give a damn to the words but the sound.

If anything, the suppression of sexuality around kids is more harmful than being open about. Maybe if we were more culturally accepting to sex in society in the first place then kids wouldn't feel so lost about how to feel about sex in the first place. It's frustrating how much of a taboo sex is treated still to this day.
#22
Quote by captainsnazz
god no


Form vs Content is an interesting discussion. Had it in my film class the other week when watching Elephant. There was this girl from Colorado in the class that said she was disgusted by how they were allowed to make the film. I mentioned how the form of the content can massively change how we perceive what we see. Van Sant created the film stylistically enough that it was acceptable to release the film.
#23
I don't feel it having a big impact. I mean stuff was certainly obviously very sexual when I was growing up and I remember it being a concern then, even specifically my choir teacher going on a rant about it in 5th grade. Perhaps its being hard to get away from for kids will make them want to sexualize themselves way too early and girls will want makeup at younger ages and stuff which could definitely be a shame but again I don't see even that as certain or likely to be consistent

From what I know kids do know about sex and everything incredibly early lately but I don't see that as a negative. Now the incredibly easy access to porn could be interesting though

Also I don't think really young kids would get Blurred Lines much
Last edited by Bob_Sacamano at Oct 31, 2014,
#29
i never really "listened" to the lyrics i just sang stuff i had heard a few times. You had songs like Sex on the beach and Horny, but to me they were just words i sang to (shamefully)
#30
The whole notion that music today is more sexual than it was in the 70s or 80s is ridiculous. I guess the only difference is that now, the sex is in a more "kid friendly" genre than hard rock (I don't listen to pop from any era so I don't know how explicit the lyrics there were).

For me personally, if I liked the song, then what difference did it make as to how sexual the lyrics were? Apparently songs dealing with consensual sex is the biggest issue of out time. Then again, I also don't think that letting a seven year old listen to something like Nikki Minaj (or however the **** you spell her name) or something equally sexual is the best idea. I think that as long as the kid knows about sex and that it should be done with both parties consenting, then there isn't really a problem.
#31
Quote by Nero Galon
If anything, the suppression of sexuality around kids is more harmful than being open about. Maybe if we were more culturally accepting to sex in society in the first place then kids wouldn't feel so lost about how to feel about sex in the first place. It's frustrating how much of a taboo sex is treated still to this day.

Tell kids not to touch the hot stove if you're trying to sell a burn salve.
#32
tbh id kill my son if I were to find him consensually listening to Nicki Minaj. Its worse than ebola.

in the other hand, its ok for him to listen to Gunther, Ding Ding Dong.
#33
it is silly to make sex taboo as it is a natural part of life and something that naturally lends itself well to music.
#34
Quote by arcanom
tbh id kill my son if I were to find him consensually listening to Nicki Minaj. Its worse than ebola.

in the other hand, its ok for him to listen to Gunther, Ding Ding Dong.


Nicki Minaj is a good rapper come at me.

Quote by Thrashtastic15
it is silly to make sex taboo as it is a natural part of life and something that naturally lends itself well to music.


tbh this.