#1
I love Electro-Harmonix at the same time I hate them. They make the coolest, weirdest products, and unlike a lot of companies that make cool, weird products, they actually make them affordable, which means I am compelled to buy more of them than I should.





I've been excited about this thing ever since it came out, even moreso when I found it wasn't even $150. As soon as I found a store that had one, I ordered it, along with an expression pedal





Unfortunately, it turns out the expression pedal I bought does not work with it, so I will be sending it back to exchange with one of the ones suggested in the Pitch Fork's manual. As such, I haven't had a chance to test out the expression pedal functions, but everything I have tested the pedal with has been outstanding.

The intervals are great both mixed in for harmonizing and doing cool melodic ideas, making chords really bloom, or setting them to things like the seconds and the seventh and turning normal-sounding bits into something bizarre and unique. Probably one of the most underheralded parts of it to me though is using it to downtune. Set the blend knob to full, turn it to the minor second, and you have Eb without all the asinine retuning.

Love this thing so far.
#3
Nice, HNPD!


How good is the polyphonic tracking (open chords, power chords, etc.)?

I've been looking for an used Micro POG near me, but I can't find any. I just want a pedal with polyphonic tracking to add a sub-octave to my dry signal (or even replace the dry signal completely with the sub-octave).
You think the Pitch Fork would get the job done? The extra range could come in handy as well...
#4
Tracking is pretty damn solid to my ears. I've had octave pedals before that would lose their place if you played multiple notes, but this thing seems to have a handle on things.

I'll see about making a quick clip to demo some of it later tonight, focusing on the lows mixed with the dry signal since you asked
#6
Quote by necrosis1193
Tracking is pretty damn solid to my ears. I've had octave pedals before that would lose their place if you played multiple notes, but this thing seems to have a handle on things.

I'll see about making a quick clip to demo some of it later tonight, focusing on the lows mixed with the dry signal since you asked

Thanks!

I'll probably give myself a Pitch Fork as a Christmas present, then... I have a side project with my band's drummer, and since we don't want a bass player (it's just 1 voice, 1 guitar and drums), I want the Pitch Fork to double what I'm playing in a sub-octave to thicken up the tone, add low end.
#7
I just bought this Ibanez Metal Charger MS10 last week. It's not really a metal sound (like a Rat) but can still get nasty and has great overtones. It's also not a Tube Screamer type OD. The Guyatone MD3 Digital Delay is great too. I've had it for several years.

Last edited by AstroZon at Nov 2, 2014,
#8
https://soundcloud.com/genuinemarco/pitch-fork-demo-octave-down

Here is the octave down demo, as promised. The playing isn't my best by any means since I'm still getting used to it, and it sounds a little flat and dull since it's using Logic's amp sims, but it should convey the picture. First half of the demo is clean, second half is dirty.

In order of where the blend knob is set for each part of the clip, both clean and dirty:

1. 9 o'clock
2. 10/11 o'clock
3. noon
4. 1/2 o'clock
5. 3 o'clock
6. 100% wet, full humbucker
7. 100% wet, split humbucker(Splitting really helps make the octave down much cleaner)

Hope that helps
#10
Quote by necrosis1193
https://soundcloud.com/genuinemarco/pitch-fork-demo-octave-down

Here is the octave down demo, as promised. The playing isn't my best by any means since I'm still getting used to it, and it sounds a little flat and dull since it's using Logic's amp sims, but it should convey the picture. First half of the demo is clean, second half is dirty.

In order of where the blend knob is set for each part of the clip, both clean and dirty:

1. 9 o'clock
2. 10/11 o'clock
3. noon
4. 1/2 o'clock
5. 3 o'clock
6. 100% wet, full humbucker
7. 100% wet, split humbucker(Splitting really helps make the octave down much cleaner)

Hope that helps

Yes, it helps a lot, thank you very much!

From 3:43 onwards are my favourite tones.
Sounds really good, and it would suit my needs perfectly. It's definitely going on my Christmas shopping list.

One last question, though, out of curiosity: is the dirt before or after the Pitch Fork?
#11
Quote by Ippon
Nice!



I'm still waiting for a reasonably-priced B9 Organ Machine.


I may or may not have caved and already bought one of those too

Quote by Linkerman
Yes, it helps a lot, thank you very much!

From 3:43 onwards are my favourite tones.
Sounds really good, and it would suit my needs perfectly. It's definitely going on my Christmas shopping list.

One last question, though, out of curiosity: is the dirt before or after the Pitch Fork?


The dirt is after the pitch fork.
#12
pitch fork is excellent. it replaced my whammy. it gets harsh when you tremolo pick, though. though that may sound better in a band context.
#13
is it possible for any pitch shifter to simulate Eb tuning? My new Zoom multi-effects is on the way and it does have a pitch-shifter, but i wonder if the pitch shifting will add some strange effects to the guitar sound or can you play an E and get Eb?
the question goes for this pedal too.

If it sounds reasonably convincing then it might be worth the compromise to me. Comparing a potentially strange effect on tone to the hassle of re-tuning is a lot like comparing apples to oranges, so i'm hoping to hear that the half step down effect will sound perfect.

I am also interested in many EHX pedals. they seem to have cool ideas and cool designs.
#14
Quote by paul.housley.7
is it possible for any pitch shifter to simulate Eb tuning? My new Zoom multi-effects is on the way and it does have a pitch-shifter, but i wonder if the pitch shifting will add some strange effects to the guitar sound or can you play an E and get Eb?

You can, but it doesn't have polyphonic capabilities, so you can only play a single note at a time.
#15
There are a couple of ways to make an expression pedal. Chances are that all you'd need to do is swap around two wires in the cable. Google it.
#16
Quote by paul.housley.7
is it possible for any pitch shifter to simulate Eb tuning? My new Zoom multi-effects is on the way and it does have a pitch-shifter, but i wonder if the pitch shifting will add some strange effects to the guitar sound or can you play an E and get Eb?
the question goes for this pedal too.

If it sounds reasonably convincing then it might be worth the compromise to me. Comparing a potentially strange effect on tone to the hassle of re-tuning is a lot like comparing apples to oranges, so i'm hoping to hear that the half step down effect will sound perfect.

I am also interested in many EHX pedals. they seem to have cool ideas and cool designs.


You tell me Same as before, clean then dirty, except I managed to find the power cable for my POD now so I'm using that instead(Fender twin with a little breakup for the clean, dirty Marshall for the dirty). First clip is the bridge, then the neck with the pickup split.
#17
Quote by necrosis1193
You tell me Same as before, clean then dirty, except I managed to find the power cable for my POD now so I'm using that instead(Fender twin with a little breakup for the clean, dirty Marshall for the dirty). First clip is the bridge, then the neck with the pickup split.

Wow, that sounds AWESOME.

Another useful feature for me, I'll be able to play old Eb Nirvana and Alice In Chains stuff without re-tuning the guitar before and after.
#18
if you had to choose between a Whammy V and the Pitchfork w/ expression pedal, Which would you choose?
#19
Quote by Linkerman
Wow, that sounds AWESOME.

Another useful feature for me, I'll be able to play old Eb Nirvana and Alice In Chains stuff without re-tuning the guitar before and after.


I really think that's one of the most underrated features about it. Eb tuning is a pain to jump between, being able to just step on a box instead is a godsend.

Bob, I will need to get back to you once I have an expression pedal that works with it
#21
I apologize for being somewhat late, this is a harmonizer pedal? Or a pitch shift pedal? Or both? Does is harmonize within a key or does it just send your guitar's tuning down or up?

I am particularly curious about the expression pedal bit. Does it work like the Digitech Whammy, jumping octaves? Or does it add a gliss effect to the set interval? Could I set that interval to an octave up?
#22
I'm fairly new to the realm of pitch altering devices, so I'm not entirely clear on the difference between a pitch shifter and a harmonizer. You can blend harmonies in, and I'll get a demo of that when I get back to my room, but it can't tell what key you're in or set itself to a certain key and know the right intervals, if that's what you mean. It can hit an odd accidental now and then if you're not paying attention.

I.am also curious about the expression pedal functions As soon as u have one that works, I'll get a demo.
#23
Quote by necrosis1193
I'm fairly new to the realm of pitch altering devices, so I'm not entirely clear on the difference between a pitch shifter and a harmonizer. You can blend harmonies in, and I'll get a demo of that when I get back to my room, but it can't tell what key you're in or set itself to a certain key and know the right intervals, if that's what you mean. It can hit an odd accidental now and then if you're not paying attention.

I.am also curious about the expression pedal functions As soon as u have one that works, I'll get a demo.


Sweet, thanks D

A pitch shifter puts your guitar up/down the set interval. So from a 2nd or a 5th, no matter what note you hit. So with a 5th, it would be an C to an G, or D to A. If you could set that to an octave jump with the expression pedal, you can get some really techy solo sounds a la the Digitech Whammy.

A harmonizer takes the notes you are playing and harmonizes them relative to the scale pattern and interval you have set. So if you set it to a C major scale at the interval of 3rds, you will always have the 3rd above the note you are playing without scale deviation. 3rds are mostly used, and the difference between a pitch shifter and a harmonizer is that the harmonizer knows whether or not to use a minor 3rd or a major 3rd.

If you set your pitch shifter to play a major third above you, in the key of C major, and you played an E, you'd have a nasty G# playing. The harmonizer would play a G instead D