#1
Hey,
I'm playing electric guitar for a year and I'm searching for songs or solos to learn.
The hardest solo I've learnt is Aces High and Crazy train.
My favourite genres are Thrash and Grovve metal, but also bands like Guns N' Roses.
Any suggestions?
Thank you
#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
This. Always this.

But the songs I like are too hard for me, I'm searching for songs which will improve my picking speed.
Do you have any?
#5
Quote by ygil1234
But the songs I like are too hard for me, I'm searching for songs which will improve my picking speed.
Do you have any?


Those you want to learn, at a tempo were you can play them.

EDIT: Also, forget about improving your picking speed. Focus on the relaxation, economy of motion and accuracy of the right hand instead, and speed will come. The sooner you stop chasing speed and chase perfection instead, you will start improving faster.
Last edited by Sickz at Nov 1, 2014,
#6
Quote by Sickz
Those you want to learn, at a tempo were you can play them.

EDIT: Also, forget about improving your picking speed. Focus on the relaxation, economy of motion and accuracy of the right hand instead, and speed will come. The sooner you stop chasing speed and chase perfection instead, you will start improving faster.


Alright, so how can I improve perfection?

thank you!
#7
Quote by ygil1234
Alright, so how can I improve perfection?

thank you!


Short answer: Play it at a tempo were you can play it perfectly.

Long answer: There are many things that goes into learning stuff perfectly, since the old saying "practice makes perfect" is flawed. Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. So you have to slow way down and get into detail.

You want to be sure of a few things when you practice (this is in no particular order).
1. Make sure you are RELAXED. Way to many players tense up more than they need to. Experiment with stuff, do you really need to hold your pick as hard as you do for it to stay between your fingers? Do you really need to fret that hard for a note to get out? Minimum effort should be used.

2. Make sure you play ACCURATELY! Your playing is the result of your practice. If you practice is sloppy, your playing will be too. When you are practicing you are mearly developing a habit for your brain (yes, technique is in the brain, not the hands), and habits don't care if they are good or bad, they will reinforce whatever you program. So if you make it a habit to play sloppy, it will only get tougher to break out of that habit.

3. Use your EARS. This ties in with #2, your brain is where the signals that controls your hands come from. If you get a sound into your head, it will be much easier for you to play it than if lets say you just read it off tablature. Develop your ears, feed them music, sing what you are playing and transcribe music and it will do wonders for your technical playing aswell as the musician part of you. If you can't hear it, you can't play it.

4. Don't chase speed, chase perfection. This is what i mentioned eariler, but it is worth repeating. Always practice at the edge of your ability, meaning the highest tempo were you can meet the standards of playing accurately and relaxed. Speed will come as a result of this and feeding your ears the music you want to play. It is worth noting that when you feel like you can't get faster, the best thing to do is to slow down. There is a saying one of the professors at the jazz school in my town used say all the time. A student asked him how to get past a speed platue he had been facing (i believe it was playing a charlie parker solo, and he could not break past 70% of the original tempo), and the teacher answered: "Twice the time, half the speed. If you are practicing tough passages, give them twice the attention, and play them at half the speed you can play it at. I have been using it for years, and it does work. All you need is abit of patience, Rome wasn't built in one day you know.

Best Regards,
Sickz