#1
I'm having problems with picking fast when playing metal. I get stuck with the pick in the strings all the time when I play fast. I think I either dig down the pick two deep, make a scooping motion or don't angle the pick enough.

* How do you pick? Do you use any scooping motion at all or do you move the pick so that it's constanty at the same distance from the string so that it doesn't get stuck?

* How do you angle the pick right without getting tension in the thumb/hand? Because when I angle the pick enough I have to push with the thumb in a weird way or angle my wrist in a weird way that does not look right.

* How do you get a smooth picking without getting stuck in the strings all the time? Do you use bruteforce and just puch hard through the string with a really tight grip or how do you develop smooth picking? Should I hit the string lightly or hard?

I haven't played for that long so I am having problems with this and it's really limiting my playing when playing fast.
#2
I don't normally scoop at all when I pick, and I normally pick with all wrist, and anchor my pinkie to the bottom of my bridge humbucker, think John Petrucci. Also, I palm-mute a lot, but when I don't, i instead rest my palm on the bridge. I would recommend playing very slowly and paying a lot of attention to what your hand is doing. In my opinion, you should nip any inefficient movements (like scooping) in the bud, unless you are consciously doing them.

What kind of picks do you use? If you use the normal sized-picks, you're probably exposing too much of the pick from your fingers. Try either choking up on the pick, or getting Jazz III's, if you don't already use them. Also, if you're using flimsy picks for metal, don't. Thin picks hang onto the strings and really hamper your speed.

I wouldn't recommend "powering through" the strings. Picking movement needs to be very controlled. You want your pick to "slice" the strings, but still have enough purchase to give your picking some definition. I normally hold my pick at an angle between 30 and 45 degrees with the strings. Look up Chris Broderick for what I consider the right angle. Though 30-45 degrees is my recommendation, it is important that you find the most efficient angle, that works best for you (Michael Angelo Batio holds his pick at almost a 90 degree angle!). Regarding holding the pick, hold it tightly enough that it won't slip from your hand, but don't hold it so tight that your thumb begins to change or lose color (does that make sense?).

Cheers man, hope this helps.
#3
Quote by kingjames123
I don't normally scoop at all when I pick, and I normally pick with all wrist, and anchor my pinkie to the bottom of my bridge humbucker, think John Petrucci. Also, I palm-mute a lot, but when I don't, i instead rest my palm on the bridge. I would recommend playing very slowly and paying a lot of attention to what your hand is doing. In my opinion, you should nip any inefficient movements (like scooping) in the bud, unless you are consciously doing them.

What kind of picks do you use? If you use the normal sized-picks, you're probably exposing too much of the pick from your fingers. Try either choking up on the pick, or getting Jazz III's, if you don't already use them. Also, if you're using flimsy picks for metal, don't. Thin picks hang onto the strings and really hamper your speed.

I wouldn't recommend "powering through" the strings. Picking movement needs to be very controlled. You want your pick to "slice" the strings, but still have enough purchase to give your picking some definition. I normally hold my pick at an angle between 30 and 45 degrees with the strings. Look up Chris Broderick for what I consider the right angle. Though 30-45 degrees is my recommendation, it is important that you find the most efficient angle, that works best for you (Michael Angelo Batio holds his pick at almost a 90 degree angle!). Regarding holding the pick, hold it tightly enough that it won't slip from your hand, but don't hold it so tight that your thumb begins to change or lose color (does that make sense?).

Cheers man, hope this helps.


I think it will help. I just need to sit down and think about this and pay attention to my technique more and practice my picking. Thanks for the help.
#4
I agree with KingJames123. Choking up on the pick is very important in making sure not too much pick is showing. A lot of my students start off with this problem. Like King said, jazz picks can help with this issue.

When I play fast I'm playing pretty light. Too much powering through strings will wear you out pretty quick and slow down your overall speed.

When I first started playing I never worried about the angle of my pick. I just used picks at least 1mm thick, and had almost none of it showing. Now, I use Sik Piks. They're already angled and actually reduce the distance from string to string. I can't stand playing with flat picks anymore.