#1
Is there a way I can safely remove a fret from a scalloped fretboard? I have a Kramer Focus 1000 that needs a few frets replaced. I have the frets to replace it with, but don't want to damage the fretboard. I'd also prefer not to pay to have them removed. Is there a way I can remove it with simple tools around the house? I've looked it up on google and the things I've seen have end nippers with flattened ends which I don't have.
#2
Will you do the fret dress yourself too? It's not as easy as to remove a fret and install another, even if it is of the exact same size. If you don't have the tools to remove the frets I see it as unlikely that you can do the fret dress, but maybe I'm wrong.
#3
Quote by HomerSGR
Will you do the fret dress yourself too? It's not as easy as to remove a fret and install another, even if it is of the exact same size. If you don't have the tools to remove the frets I see it as unlikely that you can do the fret dress, but maybe I'm wrong.


I'd prefer to do it myself, but I'm not exactly sure of everything I will need.
#4
I would strongly suggest otherwise. Fretwork is a job that is best left to a professional. It takes skill and a lot of experience to do the job right, and doing it yourself will pose a considerable risk of ending up with an unplayable neck.
#5
Quote by vz2424
Is there a way I can safely remove a fret from a scalloped fretboard? I have a Kramer Focus 1000 that needs a few frets replaced. I have the frets to replace it with, but don't want to damage the fretboard. I'd also prefer not to pay to have them removed. Is there a way I can remove it with simple tools around the house? I've looked it up on google and the things I've seen have end nippers with flattened ends which I don't have.

You will need some front cut pliers or "fret puller" as stew mac and other luthier suppliers call them.
#6
You should find out if the frets were glued in (unlikely from a manufacturer on that level of guitar, but definitely possible if you got it second-hand). If they were, you'll want to soften the glue.

There's a specific tool (fret puller):
http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Fretting/Pullers_nippers_sizing/Fret_Puller.html



If your frets ARE glued, you'll want to soften the glue by putting a soldering iron on top of the fret itself.



Maybe this will help with your technique:

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Guitar/Frets/00028Refret/00028refret01.html
#8
I agree.

The nippers shown in the picture can be made if you have access to a belt sander. And know how to use it. Trust me, mr belt sander can and will take off knuckles really fast...I used them for 8 years in machine shops, went home with well sanded knuckles a couple of times even after I learned how to use the damn thing.

For fret dress, you have to file or sand it flat to the same height as the other frets, then crown it, which means filing it to a round top, and dress the ends as well so they don't stick out past the fret board, and have an angle that matches the angle on the rest of them.

I've been doing all my own guitar work for 30 years and replacing frets is one thing I've never been brave enough to try...I've done leveling and crowning, but no complete replacements. If you want to try it, be prepared to practice a few times on el cheapo guitars you don't mind if you screw up.
#9
I've only had a fret dressing done once. The guy showed me his elaborate bench that he uses to clamp the neck and tweak the neck back to exactly how it is when it's under string tension. From there the frets are leveled.

I'm sure Stewmac sells that bench, check it out along with all of the other tools it would be nice to have for this job. It will help to decide whether you should take it to someone who has all the tools already.