#1
Hey guys,
Hopefully by the end of this year I should be able to buy a new Schecter guitar to play with, however, I still want to keep my first guitar even though it's in pretty bad condition.

Here's the thing, I want to shove some new pickups in it and paint it, as I don't like the current suburst design it has on it, BUT, the problem is that when I started playing the strap came of and the guitar fell to the floor taking a chunk of paint and wood off of the bottom and back of the guitar.

Now, I read that sanding down a guitar right down to the wood is very tiring and a long task to do, so, how to I get it to smooth out with no dips in the finish? Because I think if I just spray it without getting rid of that dent in the rest of the finish it'll be uneven and look terrible.

Do I use filler o glue or something like that? And then sand it down to be level with the paint? Or is there a less tiring (and afordable) way to sand off all the paint?

Help please, thanks in advance.
#2
Depending on the place and shape of the chunk that came off, it may be worth cutting a clean slot on the body and filling it with a piece of wood that fits snugly on the slot, then carving it to match the body's shape.

If it's just a small dent, wood filler may get the job done.


But refinishing a guitar is a really long process, and it requires practice and knowledge to be able to achieve great results, so if it's your first project don't set high hopes expecting a flawless result -- if you do, you'll probably feel disappointed in the end.

First, as you said, you need to sand the guitar body to bare wood.
Then, if the wood has big pores, scratches, dings, etc., you need to level it with filler.
Afterwards, you have to apply the primer. Then the paint.
Once the paint has dried completely, you sand it to make it even.
Finally, you apply the clearcoat, sand it as well to make it even, and finish by polishing it to have that smooth, glass-like appearance.


And yes, sanding and polishing are awful. It's very time-consuming and tiring, and you have to be extremely careful for the surfaces to be perfectly even.
#3
Would it be possible to add the wood filler and then sand off the finish?
Or does it have to be sanded down to the wood first and then have the wood filler applied?

Thanks for your reply anyway
#4
Quote by PhilipSamJacob
Would it be possible to add the wood filler and then sand off the finish?
Or does it have to be sanded down to the wood first and then have the wood filler applied?

Sand it down first. You should only start fixing the body's damages/imperfections after having exposed the raw wood.
Last edited by Linkerman at Nov 2, 2014,
#6
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Couldn't you use a chemical stripper or a heat gun to get most of the paint off?

Everyone I know always uses an orbital sander to get paint off.

I don't have a clue if there's a reason not to use a chemical stripper or heat gun, I just do it the way I learned.
#7
Quote by Linkerman
Everyone I know always uses an orbital sander to get paint off.

I don't have a clue if there's a reason not to use a chemical stripper or heat gun, I just do it the way I learned.

I don't own an orbital sander.

And even if I did, getting a guitar into orbit is an expensive business.
#8
Quote by Linkerman
Everyone I know always uses an orbital sander to get paint off.

I don't have a clue if there's a reason not to use a chemical stripper or heat gun, I just do it the way I learned.

We need pics of the damage!

I've always used rough sandpaper to get down to bare wood if I were doing a transparent or natural finish. If it's opaque, scuff-sanding has been sufficient. I use the remaining coats as a base.



BTW, what other languages do you speak? Doing Brasilian Portuguese and Spanish.
#9
Quote by Ippon
We need pics of the damage!

Of what damage?

Quote by Ippon
I've always used rough sandpaper to get down to bare wood if I were doing a transparent or natural finish. If it's opaque, scuff-sanding has been sufficient. I use the remaining coats as a base.

In my latest project we've done that, but only on the sides. Since it's a 3/4 size body, leaving the previous coats on means that it wouldn't lose much mass on the sides and made things easier -- sanding down curved areas smoothly is an absolute PITA.

The flat (top and bottom) surfaces were sanded down to the bare wood to repair some flaws.

Quote by Ippon
BTW, what other languages do you speak? Doing Brasilian Portuguese and Spanish.

I speak Portuguese (of course), which is much more different than Brasilian than people think. And not only most portuguese (myself included) hate the sound of Brasilian being spoken, but it's also annoying what they did with the grammar, ortography, etc. of our mother tongue. It shouldn't even be called Brasilian Portuguese, it should just be called Brasilian.
While the American English is extremely similar to the language it comes from, the brasilian people basically butchered the Portuguese language.

I feel comfortable with English as if it were my native tongue.
Other than that, I can get by on Spanish, French and Brasilian. And I've started to dabble a bit on Japanese, but I don't know anything interesting yet.
#10
^ Pics of the chunks of wood and paint that PhilipSamJacob mentioned in his first post.

I know just enough to get into and out of fights.

Most of the cosmopolitan Spaniards I met are the same "way" ... if you don't have the correct accent, they look at you funny. The country folks are better.
#12
Quote by PhilipSamJacob
So here's the damage:
http://imgur.com/2er3KAm

And, just to join in on the conversation, I've lived in Spain for a while and speak fluent Spanish too

Thanks for everyone's help.

If you want a spot fix, I'd scuff sand around the damage, fill with filler, sand to shape, prime, color, and clear.

If refinishing with another opaque color, I'd just scuff sand the rest of the body and use the remaining layer as a base coat.
#13
I'll probably do that, but I heard somethign about filler shrinking over time, is that true or nothing to worry about?
Thanks again