#1
Hi everyone, I have been stringing my guitar with locking tuners like this:

Thread the string through the body, angle the hole in the tuner so it is in line with the string going straight, pull it tight through, and then screw down the lock behind, tune up, and cut the excess off.

But looking online at headstocks, I have seen some people have a few winds around the tuner also.

I have no winds, just the tuner turned about half way to tune.

Am I meant to have winds around the tuner, even though they lock the string in place?

A bit confused, I might of been stringing my guitar wrong the whole time, but it stays in tune fine :s.
#2
I don't think you need any winds if you're using a locking tuner, but I could be wrong.
#3
Locking tuners don't need winding. The screw keeps the string in place by pressing it to the top of the hole in the tuning machine.
#5
If you change tunings as I do, I think it pays to have a some wrap - about one complete turn - to act as a buffer to avoid breaking the string at the post.
#6
Good, I didn't think they did, but looking on google images I saw some with winds.

If you change tunings, I don't see how that would make a difference, as if you tuned up to standard at first, you would be dropping the tuning, so there should be enough for dropping down (unless you have mega strength and somehow manage to pull it into standard tuning before locking the strings).
#7
Quote by conanwarrior
Good, I didn't think they did, but looking on google images I saw some with winds.

If you change tunings, I don't see how that would make a difference, as if you tuned up to standard at first, you would be dropping the tuning, so there should be enough for dropping down (unless you have mega strength and somehow manage to pull it into standard tuning before locking the strings).


I'm just being cautious. I change tunings a fair bit on acoustics, say open D to open G and back, and when a string breaks it is always at the crimp where the string goes into the post. I've found that have an extra wind or two on the post greatly reduces this risk. I doubt that there is much risk on light electric strings, but I still put about one complete wind on with locking tuners.
#8
I agree with Tony. I'm a guitar tech, and I always leave a little slack, about one wind. It doesn't need it, but if you tighten and loosen the strings a few times like I do when I'm working on them, they tend to break if there is no slack.
#9
Fair enough, you must have your reasons. I guess if the string breaks at the crimp, with an extra wind or two you can use the same string again?
#10
I always have two winds on the post for the unwound strings. Otherwise bends cut a burr into the edge of the hole and the burr can cut the strings. I usually do one wrap on the wound strings so I have enough slack to tune down a full step.
#11
So before putting a string trough a hole, bend it, so it would have an angle a bit more then 90 degrees. Then, when string is inside, start making circles around.
#12
Quote by Randalltbartel
So before putting a string trough a hole, bend it, so it would have an angle a bit more then 90 degrees. Then, when string is inside, start making circles around.


Pull the string up to the post, then around twice, wrapping downward. Thread the string through the hole, then lock. Or thread the string through the hole, back it out the length of the nut to the first fret, lock, and tighten.
#13
i give it perhaps 1 fill circle. maybe not even. it doesnt actually WRAP around, just enough to break the angle, like a pulley system.

i may do a full wrap or so on the lower E to account for any dropped tuning i do because i am paranoid that if the string is nearly striaght and i am really wailing on it with some hard music its going to come loose. thats just me.
#14
I never wrap my locking tuners , we play half our stuff in drop D so I'm tuning up and down all the time and never had a string break by the peg .... re-string tuned for standard first and then drop down when needed