#1
Hello. Our group lesson teacher showed us a handy bar chord pattern. Play a C chord by holding the 5th fret of strings 2, 3, and 4 with a single finger. That's E-C-G. But we want to avoid the 1st string. I believe that turns it into a 6 chord, adding in an unintentional A.

He's telling us to simply pick out the correct strings. I'm not sure he realizes how difficult this is for less experienced players. The other option is to "kink" the 1st string; muting it, no mean feat either.

What do you guys do with this?

Ken
#2
I play it as xx5588 or, less frequently, as xx5558, using index and pinky. It takes practice, but it is a useful movable chord if you get the hang of it.
Last edited by Tony Done at Nov 3, 2014,
#3
This is just the first inversion of a Cmaj which would usually look like x35553 so it really depends on what you're playing before and after this. Generally I wouldn't suggest playing all these notes with your index finger. I'd use either your first 3 or last 3 fingers. If you have to use just one finger use another to dampen the high e string or simply not pick it
#4
Quote by Tony Done
I play it as xx5588 or, less frequently, as xx5558, using index and pinky. It takes practice, but it is a useful movable chord if you get the hang of it.

By the way playing xx5588 is no longer a Cmaj chord, that's just a C5 which is just as much major as minor
#5
Yeah I would either play xx5558 barred with pinky on 8th fret, or I'd play xx5550 or xx5553 using the last 3 fingers (index, ring and pinky). I found that last way useful for me when I started because it made the transition to actually learning how to bar chords with the index finger a bit easier later down the track.
Last edited by mind_meld at Nov 3, 2014,
#6
Quote by kentrock1
Hello. Our group lesson teacher showed us a handy bar chord pattern. Play a C chord by holding the 5th fret of strings 2, 3, and 4 with a single finger. That's E-C-G. But we want to avoid the 1st string. I believe that turns it into a 6 chord, adding in an unintentional A.

He's telling us to simply pick out the correct strings. I'm not sure he realizes how difficult this is for less experienced players. The other option is to "kink" the 1st string; muting it, no mean feat either.

What do you guys do with this?

Ken


I struggled with Barre chords for years, so much so that I was completely deterred from using them. Stick it out, it gets better. In my opinion, posture/technique make a big difference. I typically keep my thumb behind the neck of the guitar as opposed to "hovering" over the top of the neck )near the low E string). I find it helps me get away from the muted notes.

One of the things I did was buy a D'Addario hand/finger exerciser from Guitar Center for $20 bucks. I've heard some people say it's not good to use, though I never heard a strong enough argument to stop me from using one.

They're pretty cool because you can adjust the tension for each finger individually. I started off by setting the index finger tension to medium and then used it the same way I'd try playing a barre chord on an actual guitar. It's difficult at first, but after about 2-3 weeks I noticed great improvements in my hand/finger strength, which led to much clearer barre chords that become significantly easier to play.

The best part about this little tool is that it's small and light weight so you can use pretty much anywhere. I used to watch TV shows and movies and use it on off without even thinking about it.

Good luck!
#7
Quote by Skizz_oV
One of the things I did was buy a D'Addario hand/finger exerciser from Guitar Center for $20 bucks. I've heard some people say it's not good to use, though I never heard a strong enough argument to stop me from using one.


I think the main argument against them is usually that you should just be playing guitar and practicing that way instead, building up your muscle memory at the same time instead of just your muscles.

As you said though, you can use those hand exercisers just about anywhere and any time without thinking about it. The same can't be said for a guitar. Of course they can't replace playing a guitar, but they can be a nice "supplement" to your practice.
#8
Thanks guys, really like that xx5558; seems to cover all bases. Or xx5553. But x35553; can anyone play that?
#9
Quote by kentrock1
Thanks guys, really like that xx5558; seems to cover all bases. Or xx5553. But x35553; can anyone play that?


Yep sure can, it comes with practice. I've got really small hands so I struggled for ages. As I mentioned, playing normal open chords like Emaj, Em, Am and Amaj without using the index finger was a good way to learn control, gain strength and develop 'new muscle memories'. But don't panic it'll come with time. I presume you've learnt all the open chords?