#1
So floyds and etc. physically stretch or loosen the strings to alter their pitch.

I know nothing at all about guitar electronics and sound characteristics altering stuff, but basically the pickups pick up the string vibrations and make them into electric signals, right?

Ok, even if im totally wrong, is there a "pot, cap" or whatever the needed component is called ( if there is such a thingy ) that would alter the electrical signal, changing its pitch to higher or lower, by a turn of a knob and send the modified signal to an amp.

So lets say i wanted to do a dive bomb, and I slowly turn a "knob" on my guitar and the pitch gets lower as I keep turning it?

Is this possible ? Would it require large and lots of components to be fitted into the guitar? Im aware of these midi touch screen thingys in guitar, but Im asking is there something that would work in a similar fashion as the volume/tone pot ? How much electronics/components would it actually need (smallest possible)?

I hope you guys understand my question

EDIT: I've never seen something like this that's why I am asking, is it not possible or simply not practical ? Because it just struck me and Im wondering why nothing comes up

EDIT2: should be possibile to mount it into the guitar body/cavity.
Last edited by Arunas at Nov 3, 2014,
#3
Quote by Dave_Mc
digitech whammy pedal


Should be something that could go inside the guitar and be "operable"
#4
ah

there are some other pitch shift pedals which might be a bit smaller. it depends on how big of a hole you're willing to cut in your guitar
#5
Quote by Dave_Mc
ah

there are some other pitch shift pedals which might be a bit smaller. it depends on how big of a hole you're willing to cut in your guitar


Something that would fit inside a "standard" LP cavity ( or similar sized ), or require minimal widening and would route out via a potentiometer (half turn left would +2 tones, half right would -2 tones, a quarter to either side would +- 1 tone)

OR a strat styled 5 position switch ( Possition: 1 (+2 tones), 2(+1 tone) 3(normal) 4(-1 tone), 5(-2 tones) or something like that. Though I picture a rotating knob would suit it better as you would get all the "passing" tones instead of a instant switch.

Basically yeah... I should investigate whats that pedal made out of and how much can i strip it to get atleast a so-so effect.
Last edited by Arunas at Nov 3, 2014,
#6
I guess the closest things you have are guitars that emulate other tunings, like Fender G-5 Strat, or Peavey AT-200.
#8
Short:
No.

Long:
In the strictest sense of the word, it is possible.

If you consider practicality, not really. If you are looking DIY (which I assume you are, since you came here), unless you have a very strong background in math, electronics, and computer science (which your first post suggests otherwise), the answer is a definitive no.

To change the pitch of a note to any tone electrically requires you to go digital. So, you need a microcontroller with good digital conversion and back that is small enough to fit in the cavity. For that you're likely going to have to design your own board for the microcontroller to be minimal enough to fit, but still has all the necessary bells and whistles. You also have to power it. Most could run on a 9-volt if you're clever I suspect, but don't expect any sort of reasonable battery life.

Next you need to write the code to change the pitch. This is where you need math and programming background. You need to do a fourier transform and pick out the pitch(es) you want to change and then adjust accordingly. You have to be careful, adjusting too few pitches will give you a crappy tone, adjusting too many will give you too much latency and you will get an audible delay between playing and hearing the notes. There might be better ways of doing this, but this is the most obvious.

Then wire it up and hope it works. It won't. Debug and debug again. Once you've worked out the bugs in your code, purchase stock in Duracell and buy a lot of batteries.

In the strictest sense of the word, it is possible. However

GOTO Short;
#9
Quote by Tempoe
FR properly set up is 1000 times better than what you are wanting


This is the best advice. Or buy a digitech whammy.
#10
I think turning a knob to alter pitch would look very cool on stage. I see no real reason why you couldn't pull a whammy pedal apart and re house it inside a guitar, but it would fit in the normal cavity with all the other stuff in there
#11
The first question i have is, how would you return the knob back to the exact neutral position? Something would have to stop it in the exact middle. IM sure however, that someone somewhere already stuck a digitech whammy inside a guitar somehow, and if you want this, you will have to make that happen, or learn to do what TJHauge said.
#12
Quote by Tempoe
FR properly set up is 1000 times better than what you are wanting



Totally agree with this.
#14
If it were easy, someone would have done it.

But it's doable. The best method would be to use piezo saddles and the kind of pitch replacement technology as used on the Line 6 Variax guitars. Those guitars will allow you to set any pitch (give or taken an octave) on the individual strings. That's a static setup, but there's nothing to keep you from having some kind of actuator (including a modestly spring-loaded bar) that would apply this to each string individually.

The advantage? If you bend a string on a Floyd-equipped guitar now, you'll usually throw the rest of the strings flat. An electronic system wouldn't have this issue. The big advantage? You could "whammy" individual strings (a current Floyd does them all at once) if you wanted to. WHY would you want to? For the same reason that steel guitar players have all those pedals. You can change the relationship of the strings to each other just as a steel guitar player does. In addition, you could make on-the-fly changes to the way the trem operates just by having a foot pedal sending signals over, say an ethernet line to the guitar. In fact, this is one of the ways that the Variax can change pitch; alternate tunings can be set in user presets on modelers like the HD500X now, for instant recall. The trem could be set to make these changes either instantly or with some kind of transition time. It would be a smart idea, but applicable only to a guitar with piezo (or other kind of hex bridge) pickups.
#15
^ of course, if you want it to sound and react like a floyd, those "disadvantages" of the floyd (or any guitar-based trem/vibrato) are kind of part of the sound of it, as well.
#16
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ of course, if you want it to sound and react like a floyd, those "disadvantages" of the floyd (or any guitar-based trem/vibrato) are kind of part of the sound of it, as well.


True. OTOH, do you really want it to sound like a Floyd? There are a lot of options for "soundalikes", and while I doubt *I'd* want to make it sound just like a Floyd (or Kahler or Wilkinson or Mustang trem or that SG side-oiler or whatever), I'm sure that the individual characteristics could probably be modeled electronically, somehow. After all, far more complicated things are being modeled on the better keyboards.
#17
My limited experience using the Digitech Whammy was that it was ok for getting sounds like wild dive bombing and such, but I thought it didn't really sound like a whammy bar on a guitar and I couldn't get any subtle control or bending to a particular note. Maybe it required more practice than I put into using it since I was just borrowing one from a friend to see if I liked it. To me it just sounded like a controlled effect not a musical tool. Good luck with your idea though, it does have merit if it can be controlled.

It kind of reminds me of the time I bought a used Heil Talk Box many years ago. It worked ok, it was cool for a few songs a night but in the long run, how many times could you use it before the band and audience started thinking "OK we've heard it. You can stop now".
#19
Quote by dspellman
True. OTOH, do you really want it to sound like a Floyd? There are a lot of options for "soundalikes", and while I doubt *I'd* want to make it sound just like a Floyd (or Kahler or Wilkinson or Mustang trem or that SG side-oiler or whatever), I'm sure that the individual characteristics could probably be modeled electronically, somehow. After all, far more complicated things are being modeled on the better keyboards.


Yeah, I'm guessing "probably".

When I said "sound like", I mean the kind of tricks you do with a floyd, rather than how it affects the tone of the guitar when it's not being used (you probably already realised that, just clarifying ).
#20
Quote by Rickholly74
My limited experience using the Digitech Whammy was that it was ok for getting sounds like wild dive bombing and such, but I thought it didn't really sound like a whammy bar on a guitar and I couldn't get any subtle control or bending to a particular note. Maybe it required more practice than I put into using it since I was just borrowing one from a friend to see if I liked it. To me it just sounded like a controlled effect not a musical tool. Good luck with your idea though, it does have merit if it can be controlled.



well thats the problem really it is an EFFECT so at some point it will always sound processed