#1
How's life?
I got a good question for the wiser today.
I keep breaking strings.. Not on 3-4 month intervals.. more like once every two weeks! I use Ernie Ball Regular Slinky's 10-46's.. changed to these same time of last year from Super Slinky's 9-42's. Is it time to go to the next size up?

A little background info that may help..
-I play alot of Bluesy music and bend the strings like it's going out of fashion..
-I am a hard strummer
-I think it really is time to graduate because these strings just aren't "cutting the mustard" for my strong hands

Any input is welcome.. Thanks to all who contribute, and
"I wish for you what I wish for myself.. your good health.."
#3
What guitar do you have? Do they break in the same place? Might have metal burrs on hardware that cuts into them. Unless you are using metal picks I see no reason hard strumming would break strings that quickly. You could go up to 11s, but that would just be slapping a band-aid on a bigger issue.
#5
I hate to steal this thread, however, I am having the same problem and it's always the a string near the bridge of the guitar.
#6
Quote by TylerKSchrute
I hate to steal this thread, however, I am having the same problem and it's always the a string near the bridge of the guitar.
Actually at the bridge?
#8
It could still be the bridge I guess. Look for sharp edges on the saddle and remove them with a bit of emery paper.
#9
Quote by Cathbard
This


it often unwinds at the ball end.. last night one broke at the bridge.. I'm using an Epiphone Les Paul 100.. soon to get Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO & Mim Stratocaster so I am wondering if I will have to modify the nut & bridge to fit 11-48's and bigger
#10
Both problems sound about the same, burrs on the saddles.

Fold a small piece of fine grit sandpaper and buff the string grooves in the saddles. You can also get cratex abrasive wheels for a dremel, use just the wheel, not the dremel, it does a great job of buffing saddles.

http://www.cratex.com/

Check the section that says Small wheels, you'll have an idea what you're looking for, you should be able to find them at most hardware stores. The grey green extra fine grit is the best for this purpose. All it takes is 10-20 seconds and it will buff out any small burrs.

If a string comes unwound at the ball end, nothing can be done about that. I've been known to solder them to prevent it, but it's not common so I stopped doing that but when you play every night for a living, it's a good precaution..
#11
it works.. but I am gonna be working my way up the Epiphone ladder of Les Puals pretty soon.. I am looking into trading the Les Paul 100 for $ off a G&L Legacy and eventually getting a black Les Paul Custom.. how much will I need to file the nut to go from 10-46's to 11-48's?
#12
It's the string saddles, without a doubt.
Quote by RoKHED
it works.. but I am gonna be working my way up the Epiphone ladder of Les Puals pretty soon.. I am looking into trading the Les Paul 100 for $ off a G&L Legacy and eventually getting a black Les Paul Custom.. how much will I need to file the nut to go from 10-46's to 11-48's?

Not much, if anything at all.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 12, 2014,
#13
If it makes you feel any better, I've been using eb regular slinkies for bout 10 years and they only time I can remember breaking a string was when a guitar I had just bought had a burr on the bridge (its common for low end guitars). It's not the strings, theres no need to get a bigger gauge if you like 10's.
#14
Agree with the saddle burr suggestions. Also, how long are you keeping the same set of strings on? If you're bending and a hard strummer it sounds like you're really abusing the strings. If you play for hours a day the strings are probably long dead by the time they break.

If you're bending strings for blues, wouldn't a higher gauge string in the same tuning INCREASE the tension on the strings and make it harder to bend? By all means give it a shot but you may end up with 10's back on there.
#15
Be careful when you file the nut, the angle matters and nut adjustment is part of the overall intonation. I think most people doing a setup would do nut adjustment before action, string radius, and saddle movement.

A lot of cheap instruments have junky pot metal saddles. So do like the others say.

Moving the string gauge around isn't as much of a problem on a Les Paul scale length as it would be on a Strat scale length. Still not that big of a deal. After I play the 10s on my Fender, I like to play the 11s on my Ibanez. You get a lot of physical feedback from the guitar and I find that musically speaking, if you are going to fail a bend, it will always sound better going a little flat (with the extra pushing effort) than going sharp.
#16
I have a set of strings on for about a month or two before I break my high e string.. I do bend for Blues and I guess I bend hard enough that I wind up choking the notes higher up on the fretboard.. even playing "Layla" it's hard to bend sometimes.. then again, I have to warm up for 20 minutes cause I write all day at school so that's no big deal.. I'm having a guy file the saddles on Friday.. he's offered to do it Free cause I take lessons at his store..
Rock N' Roll isn't just a genre of music. It's a way of life. If you fall; get the hell up, brush off, and keep rockin!