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#1
So I just picked up a Peavey 6505+ 112 Combo and it's amazing compared to my other amp. But I hear that people like to use a Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor, Boss GE-7 Equalizer pedal, and especially something like the Maxon OD808 Overdrive pedal in front of the amps distortion. What do these pedals to and how do the contribute to the sound of the amp? Will any of these pedals help me achieved a good solid metal tone? And how much of a difference will some of these pedals make? The tone I am looking for can mainly be found in the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMx8p5u99jg

Thanks!
#2
There's so many variables that you can change to improve your tone such as adding pedals, changing pickups, etc. On the 6505 combos a lot of people will upgrade the speaker and you would be surprised at what a difference a new set of good tube will do. I own the Maxon pedal and I'm sure it would help. I recommend to try swapping the tubes for a fresh set of JJs and change out the stock speaker before you start the pedal hunt.
#3
The Noise Suppressor cuts out some/most of the hiss from the amp. I use an ISP Decimator and run it in the FX Loop.

The Equalizer helps fine tune the tone. I suggest the MXR 10 Band and also run mine in the FX Loop. The EQ helps with lower volumes nicely.

The Maxon OD808 is a very expensive option. You use this to push the preamp harder, especially at lower volumes to get more of a cranked sound - Drive at 0 and Volume at 7 -10. Tone to taste. There are several pedals that work just as well that are way less expensive. The Bad Monkey (High and low EQ) and Joyo Vintage Overdrive (Single Tone) are the budget options that work well. I have both.

I run JJ tubes and swapped Celestion Vintage 30s in.

Also try running the crunch channel instead of focusing strictly on the Lead Channel.

Enjoy!!
#4
Bogner Uberschall Series 120W
A lot of metal tones are all about mid-range attack, but if you need some serious low-end for that menacing Drop-B riff you've been working on, you can't do much better than the Bogner Uberschall.
#5
Celestion V30 -Tightens the low end of the amp and takes out some of the harsh high end. The stock speaker shits the bed at high volumes too. the V30 doesn't. This is the first thing on the amp you need to change.

Full set of JJ's -Stock tubes are usually junk no matter what amp it is. JJ's will make the amps sound a little warmer.

A decent overdrive pedal (Digitech Bad Monkey, Ibanez TS9 if you want to spend more, Maxon if you want to burn more money still) -Tightens low end even more. Gives the amp midrange you cannot reproduce with the amp's EQ. Virtually everyone puts the gain of the OD on 0, the level on 10, and tone to personal taste.

EQ pedal of some kind - What this does completely depends on how you set it. It just gives you more tonal flexibility. They not exactly cheap though.

A noise gate is a nice addition, but not essential if you can live with the amp's noise.

If you get all of these things, your amp will absolutely rip. And the pedals themselves work great for all sorts of amps.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 4, 2014,
#6
A lot of you recommended changing the speaker. I don't really want to do this right now because I just spent a lot of my money into just the amp it self. Right now, the first thing I would want to upgrade that you guys mentioned are the tubes, because they don't cost to much. Can someone of you please post a link to which tube you would recommend? Since this is my first tube amp and I don't know anything about tubes, I don't exactly know what to look for.

Thanks

*EDIT*

I would like to add something real quick. I have not changed my strings in forever and would getting strings aimed towards the metal/hardcore genre such as these, http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/dunlop-heavy-core-electric-guitar-strings--heavier-gauge or any other strings help much?

Just some info that might help is that I usually tune to Drop D.
Last edited by FineVisionz at Nov 4, 2014,
#7
changing tubes will most likely result in a very minor tonal change (and you might not really hear the difference). I'd be way more inclined to get an overdrive as that will tighten the sound and give you more EQ options which you will definitely notice. as mentioned the digitch bad monkey is a good affordable option (for more money the digitech hardwire cm-2 is an even better option). noise suppressor is a good idea for playing in a band but not truly needed at practice volumes. EQs are always good but not the first place to start in your case. new strings will help but no reason to get crazy with what kind. as for the speaker well that is what produces the sound so it is a key part of any amp. more than likely you can get by with the stock one but down the road it is a consideration. knowing what you want tone wise willhelp a great deal in choosing wisely on that.
#8
Quote by FineVisionz
A lot of you recommended changing the speaker. I don't really want to do this right now because I just spent a lot of my money into just the amp it self. Right now, the first thing I would want to upgrade that you guys mentioned are the tubes, because they don't cost to much. Can someone of you please post a link to which tube you would recommend? Since this is my first tube amp and I don't know anything about tubes, I don't exactly know what to look for.

Getting a new speaker should be a priority at this point. It's the thing the amp most needs tonally.

Just get some JJ preamp tubes for now. Power amp tubes are less important with an amp like a 6505. A full set of 12AX7's (also called ECC83) will do you fine. Some people recommend slightly different versions of 12AX7's in the first slot, but a regular set of 5 works fine.
I would like to add something real quick. I have not changed my strings in forever and would getting strings aimed towards the metal/hardcore genre such as these, http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/dunlop-heavy-core-electric-guitar-strings--heavier-gauge or any other strings help much?

Just some info that might help is that I usually tune to Drop D.

A new set of strings will certainly help.

There's no such thing as strings 'aimed towards the metal/hardcore genre'. That's just marketing. The strings are just a heavier gauge.

for drop D, my personal choice of gauge is 10-52. But there's no particular rules that govern what gauge you should use.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 4, 2014,
#9
I will diffidently be trying out some of the suggestions that I can this weekend. Since I am not exactly sure how to use the EQ on an amp. I have messed around for the best few days and can't exactly figure out how to fine tune a setting. If it's possible, could you give me some suggestions on were to place the knobs such as

preseasons
resonance
high
mid
low
pre

Not exactly sure if this is even possible for you to even answer, but I though it would be worth a shot.
#11
Quote by FineVisionz
I will diffidently be trying out some of the suggestions that I can this weekend. Since I am not exactly sure how to use the EQ on an amp. I have messed around for the best few days and can't exactly figure out how to fine tune a setting. If it's possible, could you give me some suggestions on were to place the knobs such as

preseasons
resonance
high
mid
low
pre

Not exactly sure if this is even possible for you to even answer, but I though it would be worth a shot.

Start with all the knobs at 12 o'clock and move them one at a time to learn how moving the knobs affects the tone. Finding a sound you like takes time and people's personal tastes differ. Really it's something you need to experiment with on your own.
Quote by FineVisionz

The difference to me personally is almost unnoticeable.

Nah the difference is obvious. Less midrange and treble, and less gain with the OD turned off. You'd have to be completely tone deaf to not hear much of a difference at 1:10.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 5, 2014,
#12
finevisionz buddy you really need to take some time with your amp to learn it in and out before worrying about other stuff. your amp can certainly get a decent metal tone with no help at all. until you have a reasonable understanding of how it works and sounds adding more stuff will be a waste of money. buying gear should be based on needs and if you don't know what you need then you may not buy what is right for you. also keep in mind that there are no magic pedals that will automatically give you great tone or duplicate you fav players sound. often this involves a great deal of trial and error.
#13
Quote by FineVisionz
A lot of you recommended changing the speaker. I don't really want to do this right now because I just spent a lot of my money into just the amp it self. Right now, the first thing I would want to upgrade that you guys mentioned are the tubes, because they don't cost to much.



A single Celestion V30 will cost you much less than all the tubes and the labor for rebiasing. It'll also get you a much better result. Those new tubes can only sound so good through the shitty stock speaker.
#14
1) do you like the sound of your amp??? If so, do not change the speaker or get an EQ pedal - that's flushing money down the toilet.

2) Tubes only need to be replaced if they are worn and are causing audible issues.

3) an overdrive pedal drives the amp harder and can give you either a volume boost or more gain. If you're happy with the amp distortion and don't require more gain for solos etc, then you don't need an overdrive pedal.

4) EQ pedals are pointless for guitar. If you need an EQ pedal to get a decent tone, you have a shitty amp. They can be used as a boost, but I would always go with a boost pedal before choosing an EQ epdal.

5) EQ on your amp : you should start with everything set to 5 and ADJUST from there. You need to listen and make changes to match the tone you are looking for. In my experience, if your amp isn't giving you a decent tone with the EQ set flat, you need a new amp because nothing you can change will drastically improve the tone.
#15
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Start with all the knobs at 12 o'clock and move them one at a time to learn how moving the knobs affects the tone. Finding a sound you like takes time and people's personal tastes differ. Really it's something you need to experiment with on your own.

Nah the difference is obvious. Less midrange and treble, and less gain with the OD turned off. You'd have to be completely tone deaf to not hear much of a difference at 1:10.


i agree very obvious, but IMO rec's dont need boosts as bad as some other amps. i run my tremoverb with or without. 5150's need it more.

i do not feel that the video was a fair judgement for your amp.
#16
Quote by reverb66
1) do you like the sound of your amp??? If so, do not change the speaker or get an EQ pedal - that's flushing money down the toilet.

2) Tubes only need to be replaced if they are worn and are causing audible issues.

3) an overdrive pedal drives the amp harder and can give you either a volume boost or more gain. If you're happy with the amp distortion and don't require more gain for solos etc, then you don't need an overdrive pedal.

4) EQ pedals are pointless for guitar. If you need an EQ pedal to get a decent tone, you have a shitty amp. They can be used as a boost, but I would always go with a boost pedal before choosing an EQ epdal.

5) EQ on your amp : you should start with everything set to 5 and ADJUST from there. You need to listen and make changes to match the tone you are looking for. In my experience, if your amp isn't giving you a decent tone with the EQ set flat, you need a new amp because nothing you can change will drastically improve the tone.


i disagree on all five points.
#17
Quote by reverb66
1) do you like the sound of your amp??? If so, do not change the speaker or get an EQ pedal - that's flushing money down the toilet.



Well, well; would you look at all the opinions in here! Where'd you get such insights?

Quote by reverb66
2) Tubes only need to be replaced if they are worn and are causing audible issues.


Different tube companies have different characteristics. If you've never heard an amp's difference after swapping a Sovtek from a GrooveTube, I'd highly suggest you check it out. Tube choices are characteristic choices. I recommend different companies of tube manufacturer depending on the sound you want to achieve.

Quote by reverb66
3) an overdrive pedal drives the amp harder and can give you either a volume boost or more gain. If you're happy with the amp distortion and don't require more gain for solos etc, then you don't need an overdrive pedal.


It absolutely does more than that. It acts as a filter as well, so you can sweep your tone. Why else would just about every OD pedal in the world have a tone knob? Or a Mid-range boost? Or a Treble cut? Or a Fat Switch? etc...

Quote by reverb66
4) EQ pedals are pointless for guitar. If you need an EQ pedal to get a decent tone, you have a shitty amp. They can be used as a boost, but I would always go with a boost pedal before choosing an EQ epdal.


This is just ignorant.

Quote by reverb66
5) EQ on your amp : you should start with everything set to 5 and ADJUST from there. You need to listen and make changes to match the tone you are looking for. In my experience, if your amp isn't giving you a decent tone with the EQ set flat, you need a new amp because nothing you can change will drastically improve the tone.


Start at 5? Sounds like a man who's never used a Class A wired amp with a EQ before.
Last edited by JustRooster at Nov 5, 2014,
#18
Quote by reverb66
1) do you like the sound of your amp??? If so, do not change the speaker or get an EQ pedal - that's flushing money down the toilet.

BULLSHIT BULLSHIT BULLSHIT


besides failing misaribly with your five points, if you keep stock things you won't really lose EQ pedals can be used on any amp OR rig, as well as the speaker. swap back to stock. tubes too if you want. don't use a dime and you have some stuff sitting around.
#19
Quote by trashedlostfdup
besides failing misaribly with your five points, if you keep stock things you won't really lose EQ pedals can be used on any amp OR rig, as well as the speaker. swap back to stock. tubes too if you want. don't use a dime and you have some stuff sitting around.


EQ pedal + speaker swap + brand new set of tubes. The amp he owns is only worth$700 brand new. You guys want him to spend hundreds of dollars on "upgrades" that will probably fail to improve his tone. He may as well sell his amp and get a better one rather than waste money on upgrades that may or may not improve anything.

OP - if you're amp doesn't sound good directly plugged in - you have a problem that will not be fixed with pedals ( especially EQ!) or tubes or even speakers. It's a $700 amp - there's no point in throwing $300- $400 at it hoping to improve it.

I have over 20 years experience wasting money on pedals and tube swaps trying to improve a shitty amps ' tone and I can categorically state, as the owner of a glorious Class A tube amp that sounds magnificent with all the controls on 5!, that if the amp doesn't sound good plugged in directly - nothing you will throw at it will really change that and you will be wasting your money and effort making incremental changes that are not cost effective.
#20
^^

The price tag doesn't say much about the amp. Maybe it's 'only 700' because of cost cutting at those facets. Doesn't mean every part of the amp is mediocre in itself.

I also own a class A amp, and with EQ below 5 you barely get punch and presence, and with EQ at 0 there's no sound. They are like independent volume knobs for bands.

A speaker is also the projecting part of the sound and matters quite a lot.
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 5, 2014,
#21
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Celestion V30 -Tightens the low end of the amp and takes out some of the harsh high end. The stock speaker shits the bed at high volumes too. the V30 doesn't. This is the first thing on the amp you need to change.

Full set of JJ's -Stock tubes are usually junk no matter what amp it is. JJ's will make the amps sound a little warmer.

A decent overdrive pedal (Digitech Bad Monkey, Ibanez TS9 if you want to spend more, Maxon if you want to burn more money still) -Tightens low end even more. Gives the amp midrange you cannot reproduce with the amp's EQ. Virtually everyone puts the gain of the OD on 0, the level on 10, and tone to personal taste.

EQ pedal of some kind - What this does completely depends on how you set it. It just gives you more tonal flexibility. They not exactly cheap though.

A noise gate is a nice addition, but not essential if you can live with the amp's noise.

If you get all of these things, your amp will absolutely rip. And the pedals themselves work great for all sorts of amps.


I'm not familiar with the combo version, but if the speaker's bad i'd change that (i'd change the speaker before tubes, a full set of tubes is dearer than a speaker, no?), and get an OD (the maxon's cheaper than the ts9, no? i'd get the maxon od9, though, i think the od808 is half-assed bypass and it's not a ts808 anyway, it's a ts10).

Quote by FineVisionz
I was checking out some tube screamer pedal videos and found this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yc1c78S3Uyc

The difference to me personally is almost unnoticeable.


it's a lot more noticeable when you're playing

Quote by reverb66

OP - if you're amp doesn't sound good directly plugged in - you have a problem that will not be fixed with pedals ( especially EQ!) or tubes or even speakers. It's a $700 amp - there's no point in throwing $300- $400 at it hoping to improve it.


lolwut

you can get an eminence or WGS speaker for about $75. A bad monkey or boss SD1 is under $50. That's hardly $400. And it very definitely will make a difference.

I agree that if you're throwing 3 times the money as the thing is worth that that's maybe silly. but he doesn't have to do that (and a lot of the more expensive amps will also benefit from the things we're suggesting here).
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Nov 5, 2014,
#22
nothing is wasted if brought back to stock. then you sell your amp stock. you keep your OD, EQ, the upgraded speaker, hell swap the tubes back to stock and have a few nice extra tubes around.

most people would benefit from an EQ and an OD regardless of amp, that is not sunk funds. you have that equipment for another amp.

reverb66


Originally Posted by reverb66
OP - if you're amp doesn't sound good directly plugged in - you have a problem that will not be fixed with pedals ( especially EQ!) or tubes or even speakers. It's a $700 amp - there's no point in throwing $300- $400 at it hoping to improve it.


again.

you should know what you are posting about, or not post.
#23
Quote by reverb66
EQ pedal + speaker swap + brand new set of tubes. The amp he owns is only worth$700 brand new. You guys want him to spend hundreds of dollars on "upgrades" that will probably fail to improve his tone. He may as well sell his amp and get a better one rather than waste money on upgrades that may or may not improve anything.

OP - if you're amp doesn't sound good directly plugged in - you have a problem that will not be fixed with pedals ( especially EQ!) or tubes or even speakers. It's a $700 amp - there's no point in throwing $300- $400 at it hoping to improve it.

I have over 20 years experience wasting money on pedals and tube swaps trying to improve a shitty amps ' tone and I can categorically state, as the owner of a glorious Class A tube amp that sounds magnificent with all the controls on 5!, that if the amp doesn't sound good plugged in directly - nothing you will throw at it will really change that and you will be wasting your money and effort making incremental changes that are not cost effective.



The modifications we suggested to the Peavey aren't our simple conjectures or ideas, they're proven improvements that many people have done and will continue to do. A tubescreamer in front of a 6505+ with a V30 swap is one of the most standard metal sounds of our time.

I wonder what Cathbard would have to say about all this.
#24
Quote by monwobobbo
finevisionz buddy you really need to take some time with your amp to learn it in and out before worrying about other stuff. your amp can certainly get a decent metal tone with no help at all. until you have a reasonable understanding of how it works and sounds adding more stuff will be a waste of money. buying gear should be based on needs and if you don't know what you need then you may not buy what is right for you. also keep in mind that there are no magic pedals that will automatically give you great tone or duplicate you fav players sound. often this involves a great deal of trial and error.

Agreed!

Quote by JustRooster
1. The modifications we suggested to the Peavey aren't our simple conjectures or ideas, they're proven improvements that many people have done and will continue to do. A tubescreamer in front of a 6505+ with a V30 swap is one of the most standard metal sounds of our time.

2. I wonder what Cathbard would have to say about all this.

1. Correct! Inexpensive and easy.

2. Cath is more punk/pub rock, yea?
#26
Quote by JustRooster
Moreso just to see what his thoughts would be about all these bad amp opinions

He'd drive them off his lawn and recommend an RM100 with the SLO module.
#27
^ lol

Quote by trashedlostfdup
nothing is wasted if brought back to stock. then you sell your amp stock. you keep your OD, EQ, the upgraded speaker, hell swap the tubes back to stock and have a few nice extra tubes around.

most people would benefit from an EQ and an OD regardless of amp, that is not sunk funds. you have that equipment for another amp.


also good points
#28
Quote by reverb66
EQ pedal + speaker swap + brand new set of tubes. The amp he owns is only worth$700 brand new. You guys want him to spend hundreds of dollars on "upgrades" that will probably fail to improve his tone. He may as well sell his amp and get a better one rather than waste money on upgrades that may or may not improve anything.

OP - if you're amp doesn't sound good directly plugged in - you have a problem that will not be fixed with pedals ( especially EQ!) or tubes or even speakers. It's a $700 amp - there's no point in throwing $300- $400 at it hoping to improve it.

I have over 20 years experience wasting money on pedals and tube swaps trying to improve a shitty amps ' tone and I can categorically state, as the owner of a glorious Class A tube amp that sounds magnificent with all the controls on 5!, that if the amp doesn't sound good plugged in directly - nothing you will throw at it will really change that and you will be wasting your money and effort making incremental changes that are not cost effective.


glorious class A amp and yet you don't mention what it is or what style of music you play. guessing it's not really metal. nothing wrong with his amp at all it's a solid amp known for it's metal voicing. is it top of the line no but so what it's far from a shitty amp. clearly the OP is a noob when it comes to tone so we are just trying to help. an overdrive or eq will certainly help to improve the tone and will give him more tonal options which is never a waste of money.

as for an amp sounding good when plugging straight in sure you have a point but a poorly supported one. for instance I would think htat most of us would agree that a fender twin has a great clean sound but not so much for metal. does that make it a bad amp tonally no not at all (just not the best tool for the job). now slap a decent overdrive or distortion pedal in front and you can get a great metal tone. hardly a waste of money as now you have the best of both worlds and lets face it 2 amps would be more expensive than a pedal or 2.

pedals if bought with some knowledge as to what you want are very cost effective. I had the same tubescreamer for 25 years before it finally craped out. still have a chorus pedal I bought in 1985 which works fine and is good enough that I haven't had the urge to replace it. have I owned a ton of pedals over the years yes but so what a learning experience if nothing else ( huge profit from now vintage pedals I sold after having them for 30 years)

now yes some of the options give to the OP are kinda expensive but they answer the ? none the less. they are opinions and options that is all.
#31
Quote by metalmingee
The Noise Suppressor cuts out some/most of the hiss from the amp.


This is not correct. When there is ONLY hiss from the amp, the noise suppressor activates, and cuts out all the sound. But as soon as you touch a string the noise suppressor stops doing its thing, and you hear everything from the amp (but now its mostly guitar, but the hiss is still there). It's a noise gate, not a noise removal device.

The practical result is that the amp will be quiet when you stop playing, instead of hissing. Thats it. No magic noise removal.
#32
Quote by innovine
This is not correct. When there is ONLY hiss from the amp, the noise suppressor activates, and cuts out all the sound. But as soon as you touch a string the noise suppressor stops doing its thing, and you hear everything from the amp (but now its mostly guitar, but the hiss is still there). It's a noise gate, not a noise removal device.

The practical result is that the amp will be quiet when you stop playing, instead of hissing. Thats it. No magic noise removal.



So, would that also mean it would get rid of the feedback?
#33
Quote by FineVisionz
So, would that also mean it would get rid of the feedback?


yes it will cut way down on that. keep in mind that feedback is in part due to volume and gain. the higher each is the more likely you will get some feedback (especially with gain). a noise suppressor will help to keep that in check but if you dime the volume and gain it won't totally prevent feedback. good tool to have when playing modern metal though and I think you'll find that it is on the board of most pro players in the3 genre.
#34
No. The ns2 does nothing for feedback. When the signal from the guitar goes quiet, the noise supressor kicks in and reduces it to silence. So, if there is hiss, it cuts this out. But as soon as you tough a string it opens up and lets that sound through, hiss and all. Feedback is loud, so the ns2 doesn't do anything, it only activates when the guitar is quiet.
#35
Quote by JustRooster
The modifications we suggested to the Peavey aren't our simple conjectures or ideas, they're proven improvements that many people have done and will continue to do. A tubescreamer in front of a 6505+ with a V30 swap is one of the most standard metal sounds of our time.

I wonder what Cathbard would have to say about all this.


Look, I'm just trying to save the guy some time, money and effort. The best advice I ever received was "if the amp isn't in the ballpark of the tone you're looking for, then pedals etc are not going to solve your basic tone issue". Metal distortions come primarily from the amp distortion- that's how nearly all the great bands get their heavy tones.

I don't know if the Peavey is a bad amp - I've never heard it. I'm not even sure if the OP thinks its a bad amp, but I'm assuming that's the case since he seems to be looking for advice on how to improve the tone.

Overdrives are not a bad investment, but they will not turn crap into gold. Someone alluded to using one with a Fender Twin and getting a good tone- well that's a great amp so how does that refute what I'm trying to communicate here?

EQ pedals are a terrible investment if the goal is to substantially improve on the tone of the amp, because that it not what an EQ does - an EQ sculps the tone that's available. Any sound engineer understands this. His amp already has an EQ, like every other amp. Maybe it's so terrible of an EQ that a pedal is necessary to get usable control over his tone - I don't know, but if that's the case - replacing the amp would be my advice again.

Unfortunately, great amps cost a lot of money - several thousands usually. This is what actual metal bands are using to record the albums you guys are listening to, with the exception of other tools such as Axe FX and Kemper, which are wildly expensive in their own right.
#36
Quote by reverb66
I don't know if the Peavey is a bad amp - I've never heard it. I'm not even sure if the OP thinks its a bad amp, but I'm assuming that's the case since he seems to be looking for advice on how to improve the tone.


You're wrong. The 6505/5150 have produced some of the defining metal tones of the years since they were released. Putting a Vintage 30 in the cab and throwing an OD pedal in front of it are both fantastically good pieces of advice that will basically replicate the conditions that so many bands over the years have used to get the tones they use.

In fact when you're talking about modellers later... the 6505/5150 is one of the tones they model a lot, right up there with a Rectifier or SLO when it comes to high gain sounds.

Frankly, the fact that you've apparently never heard of one of the most widely used and famous metal amps of the modern age tells me you should probably stop talking about it. You don't know what you're talking about, quite literally.

Quote by reverb66
Unfortunately, great amps cost a lot of money - several thousands usually. This is what actual metal bands are using to record the albums you guys are listening to, with the exception of other tools such as Axe FX and Kemper, which are wildly expensive in their own right.


The 6505 is a great amp, it just doesn't sound 100% the way people hear it in recordings because it gets used in a very specific way most of the time and you can't get that sound with just the amp.

I think you're actually labouring under a misapprehension here: the video TS posted is the exact amp he has... with an OD in front of it and a different speaker from stock in the cab. TS is looking for that tone. Those things are what is needed to get that tone.

The amp is the tone he's looking for, it just needs a little more subtle sculpting to get to exactly what he wants it to do.


Further evidence:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yq0NIeOoiBI

Same amp, different speakers and an OD in front.


For the record: not saying you're totally wrong in general... but the things you're saying don't apply to this thread. At all.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Nov 7, 2014,
#37
Quote by reverb66
Look, I'm just trying to save the guy some time, money and effort. The best advice I ever received was "if the amp isn't in the ballpark of the tone you're looking for, then pedals etc are not going to solve your basic tone issue". Metal distortions come primarily from the amp distortion- that's how nearly all the great bands get their heavy tones.

I don't know if the Peavey is a bad amp - I've never heard it. I'm not even sure if the OP thinks its a bad amp, but I'm assuming that's the case since he seems to be looking for advice on how to improve the tone.

Overdrives are not a bad investment, but they will not turn crap into gold. Someone alluded to using one with a Fender Twin and getting a good tone- well that's a great amp so how does that refute what I'm trying to communicate here?

EQ pedals are a terrible investment if the goal is to substantially improve on the tone of the amp, because that it not what an EQ does - an EQ sculps the tone that's available. Any sound engineer understands this. His amp already has an EQ, like every other amp. Maybe it's so terrible of an EQ that a pedal is necessary to get usable control over his tone - I don't know, but if that's the case - replacing the amp would be my advice again.

Unfortunately, great amps cost a lot of money - several thousands usually. This is what actual metal bands are using to record the albums you guys are listening to, with the exception of other tools such as Axe FX and Kemper, which are wildly expensive in their own right.


Point 1+3=

On the part about the EQ. That is correct, but an EQ pedal will also give you a lot more control over specific frequencies than a parametric EQ will. I've often found when recording anyway there's a few touches to the amp that I would have to do to it, but a solid base tone counts in the long run.
#39
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I wish I knew where to start with Reverb. I really do.


Oh I think "stop talking" is a good start
#40
Quote by reverb66


Overdrives are not a bad investment, but they will not turn crap into gold. Someone alluded to using one with a Fender Twin and getting a good tone- well that's a great amp so how does that refute what I'm trying to communicate here?


This is a thread about metal tone, where you say that overdrive won't turn a bad amp into gold, and you're suggesting an amp that doesn't even have a distortion channel.

Also, if you don't know the 6505+, why argue about it?
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