#1
I bought an Ibanez GSR-200. Please see the four knobs:



From what I can tell, the one circled in red is the master volume. My guess is that the others correspond to the three pickups.

I am at a loss as to which pickups to use. This song is slow heavy metal in the manner of For Whom The Bell Tolls. But I plan to play punk rock and pop rock as well.

Please, any guidance would be much appreciated. Thanks.
#2
From what I can recall, they are a master volume, master tone, pickup selector, and a boost. As for which pickup to use, Cliff Burton played a Precision Bass, and so do a lot of the punk and rock players.
#3
Cliff Burton very rarely used a P-Bass - Rickenbacker and Aria Pro II mainly.

I would say use the neck pickups for punk sound but it depends on what amp, strings etc you're using.
Use whichever pickups sound good to you.....
#6
Quote by selftaught1000
From what I can tell, the one circled in red is the master volume. My guess is that the others correspond to the three pickups.


You actually only have two pickups. The neck pickup is a split coil precision-style pickup, but there's just one of them. Three pickups is not something you encounter all too often on bass (can only think of Musicman who regularly make basses with three).
#7
Just experiment with them and you'll figure out what they are for. (Turn them up and down one knob at the time and you'll figure out which of them are volume knobs and then try the other knobs - again turn them up and down one at the time and see how that affects the tone). We had a similar bass in our school and the controls were the same as CorrosionMedia posted. The "PHAT EQ" is a bass boost IIRC.

And yeah, that's not a 3 pickup bass. It only has two pickups - a Precision style split coil pickup and a Jazz style single coil pickup.
#8
I have experimented w/ them. Hard to say what they do.

What is a P-bass? Is that some kind of setting.

Should you play w/ both pickups or just one?

I understand that there are not hard-and-fast rules. But are there rules of thumb?

Thanks.
#9
Quote by selftaught1000
I have experimented w/ them. Hard to say what they do.

What is a P-bass? Is that some kind of setting.

Should you play w/ both pickups or just one?

I understand that there are not hard-and-fast rules. But are there rules of thumb?

Thanks.

They do exactly what that diagram says. The two knobs closest to the pickups and bridge are the volume controls for each pickup. The other two knobs are the tone (larger knob) which rolls off treble as you turn it, and the Phat II eq (smaller knob) which is a bass boost

A P bass or Precision Bass is a type of bass guitar made by Fender. It's one of the "golden standards" of basses, and basses made by other manufacturers with a similar design are often referred to as P basses. The hallmark feature of P basses is the split coil pickup like the neck pickup on your bass. Your bass's pickup configuration is called a P/J, which refers to the Precision neck pickup and the Jazz bridge pickup.

Which pickups you play with is entirely up to you.
#10
The controls on a bass are much like that of a stereo system. There are knobs for volume and tone like bass, treble and sometimes mid. Bass guitars either have a master volume for all pickups, or two separate volume knobs – one for each pickup. With a master volume knob there is a separate knob that blends or balances the two pickups. A master volume is a little easier to control and set. All basses have at least one tone knob. This allows you to adjust the amount of bass or treble frequencies output by the bass.
Last edited by Randalltbartel at Nov 6, 2014,
#11
Quote by selftaught1000
I have experimented w/ them. Hard to say what they do.

What is a P-bass? Is that some kind of setting.

Should you play w/ both pickups or just one?

I understand that there are not hard-and-fast rules. But are there rules of thumb?

Thanks.

IIRC, the bass boost can get a bit over the top so I would start with it turned to 0. That means no bass boost, ie the neutral setting. Then, if you feel like you need some more "balls" to the tone, turn it up until you like your tone. It may get a bit boomy if you turn it up too high. Remember that you can also boost your bass by turning the amp's bass knob up. Experiment.

I would start with tone at full because that's the neutral setting. If you feel the sound is too harsh, turn it down a bit. That will give you a "softer" sound. You can also turn down the treble knob of your amp. Again, experiment.

Experiment with different pickup positions. Try your bridge pickup only (turn the bridge pickup volume all the way up). That should give you a more trebly, maybe a bit honky sound. It is good for solo playing because it sounds more clear than the other positions. But that position can lack some bass which may not be good if you want a full sound. If you like the tone of your bridge pickup soloed but think it lacks some lows, I think the bass boost would be good for that.

Now try your neck pickup only (turn the bridge pickup volume all the way down and neck pickup volume all the way up). This should give you a classic Precision Bass sound. It has a nice "round" tone that works well for most stuff. This pickup is more bassy so you may not want to have the bass boost too high. Turn both pickups all the way up and you get the mix of the two pickups. It has a more "balanced" tone. It has the highs of the bridge pickup and the lows of the neck pickup.

You can also have a blend of these pickups. For example you could have your neck pickup volume at full and bridge pickup volume at half (or any other combination). Again, experiment. Also, you don't have to max the pickup volumes. But volume maxed is the neutral setting so I would start with that. Turning the pickup volume down a bit also changes tone. So experiment with that. I don't like turning down the pickup volume. If you want to play quieter, turn down your amp volume. It doesn't affect your tone.

Pickup positions and tone settings are like on guitar. All pickup positions have a different kind of sound. But it is up to you how you use them. Some people like rolling the tone off a bit. Some people like having the tone of the instrument maxed.

Experiment.
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
IIRC, the bass boost can get a bit over the top so I would start with it turned to 0. That means no bass boost, ie the neutral setting. Then, if you feel like you need some more "balls" to the tone, turn it up until you like your tone. It may get a bit boomy if you turn it up too high. Remember that you can also boost your bass by turning the amp's bass knob up. Experiment.

I would start with tone at full because that's the neutral setting. If you feel the sound is too harsh, turn it down a bit. That will give you a "softer" sound. You can also turn down the treble knob of your amp. Again, experiment.

Experiment with different pickup positions. Try your bridge pickup only (turn the bridge pickup volume all the way up). That should give you a more trebly, maybe a bit honky sound. It is good for solo playing because it sounds more clear than the other positions. But that position can lack some bass which may not be good if you want a full sound. If you like the tone of your bridge pickup soloed but think it lacks some lows, I think the bass boost would be good for that.

Now try your neck pickup only (turn the bridge pickup volume all the way down and neck pickup volume all the way up). This should give you a classic Precision Bass sound. It has a nice "round" tone that works well for most stuff. This pickup is more bassy so you may not want to have the bass boost too high. Turn both pickups all the way up and you get the mix of the two pickups. It has a more "balanced" tone. It has the highs of the bridge pickup and the lows of the neck pickup.

You can also have a blend of these pickups. For example you could have your neck pickup volume at full and bridge pickup volume at half (or any other combination). Again, experiment. Also, you don't have to max the pickup volumes. But volume maxed is the neutral setting so I would start with that. Turning the pickup volume down a bit also changes tone. So experiment with that. I don't like turning down the pickup volume. If you want to play quieter, turn down your amp volume. It doesn't affect your tone.

Pickup positions and tone settings are like on guitar. All pickup positions have a different kind of sound. But it is up to you how you use them. Some people like rolling the tone off a bit. Some people like having the tone of the instrument maxed.

Experiment.


Yes, I understand now. Thanks.