#1
Hi,
So am really going for it and prepared to practice 5 to 7 hours everyday.
So my goals are to have a good understanding of chords, be able to rip up and down three.note.per strings scales at lighting speed with out thinking and be decent with theory.
Basically improve all my techniques. Tapping, legato etc
So here's my plan so far

right hand
1- warmup - pick every string open for at least 2 minutes each.(pick in different places)
Then play scales on one string, then 2 use metronome
2-adjacent strings- pick chord and pick all down or all up. Then down and up.
Then two notes per string etc
3-non adjacent strings- do the same above but string skip.
4-then hybird picking chords

Left hand
1-spider exercise
2-play legato patterns for
3-play thrills with all fingers

I think having 7 parts left hand, right hand, techniques, scales, chords, theory, and ear training.

My favorite guitarist are Buckethead and Paul Gilbert.
This is my first time doing Anything like this so please help what I should be learning how long etc.
I've been playing for two years so know the basics. I can play pretty fast, know modes , barre chords, how chords are made etc...

Thanks!
#2
I would strongly advice you fit in time for transcription there. Learning by ear from recordings of your favorite players is essential. Also lots of ear training, do you really know your intervals, arpeggios and scales? Can you sing them accurately and imagine them in your head?

In my personal opinion your practice routine is too technical and not enough musical. You might become a good technical player if you practice those topics well, but you might have a harder time becoming a good musician. Focus on the ear more, transcribe, do ear training, sing what you are studying. Time should also be assigned for focused listening to the great players you enjoy, and with focused listening i don't mean having it on in the background, sit and really listen to the tunes and try to hear every detail, from all the instruments. Also, practice improvisation, a spontaneous musical mind is one of the greatest assets you can have.
#3
From a technique standpoint that looks ok, however from a musical standpoint its terrible.

You need to include some musical practice in there in addition to that, otherwise you will sound like a three-note per string robot - the world does not need more of those. Guthrie Govan advocates that you focus on learning things within a musical context, I agree with that statement. He also advocates learning by ear - that is the most important thing missing from your routine.

Each day should have a substantial amount of time learning and practicing songs and solos.

Any practice routine that doesn't include time learning songs by ear is deficient from a musical standpoint. This is a skill that needs developing if you want to create songs and solos.

I would also encourage you to try to find tunes and solos that incorporate the techniques that interest you and focus on learning those rather than simply mindlessly doing exercises in a vaccum. You want legato, learn a satriani solo. You want to practice your picking - learn Erotomania from Dream Theater or Tumeni notes from Steve Morse - you want to practice hybrid picking chords, learn the intro to The Audience is listening from Vai etc. Musical context for the techniques really helps.

I would also encourage you to spend some time working on articulation - bends and vibratos in particular - check out some SRV or Albert King and try to work on mastering different vibratos and bends. SRV is really the master when it comes to that so it's a good place to start.
#4
Quote by Sickz
I would strongly advice you fit in time for transcription there. Learning by ear from recordings of your favorite players is essential. Also lots of ear training, do you really know your intervals, arpeggios and scales? Can you sing them accurately and imagine them in your head?

In my personal opinion your practice routine is too technical and not enough musical. You might become a good technical player if you practice those topics well, but you might have a harder time becoming a good musician. Focus on the ear more, transcribe, do ear training, sing what you are studying. Time should also be assigned for focused listening to the great players you enjoy, and with focused listening i don't mean having it on in the background, sit and really listen to the tunes and try to hear every detail, from all the instruments. Also, practice improvisation, a spontaneous musical mind is one of the greatest assets you can have.


This was posted before I finished mine lol. Great advice.
#5
Thanks everyone
Yes I would also figure a song out by ear I'm pretty good at this i love doing it. Also I'm just starting to learn how to hear intervals. Also I practice improv. I also understand that's it's not all about techniques. I thing 1 hour on techniques,30 mins ear training, also making a mini song, and practice scales , arpeggios and chords and theory. As right now am not practicing effectvly u know am on and off. I need to focus.

I've been watching this video for some ideas
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Sdoz16LRz9Q
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Nov 5, 2014,
#6
Here's my complete routine
1 right hand
1- warmup - pick every string open for at least 2 minutes each.(pick in different places)
Then play scales on one string, then 2 use metronome 15 min
2-adjacent strings- pick chord and pick all down or all up. Then down and up.
Then two notes per string etc 15 min
3-non adjacent strings- do the same above but string skip. 5 min
4-then hybird picking chords 10 min

2 Left hand
1-spider exercise 10 min
2-play thrills with all fingers 10 min
3-ladder finger exercise 10 min
4-chormatic up and down the neck. 10 min
5-Permutations 10 min

3 Scales
1-major scale on one string 25 min
2-then the same on 2 strings then 3 etc 25 min
3-practice three note per strings scales and play with backing track 20 min
4- modes 10 min

4 Chords and arpeggios
1- learn chords from other lessons 15 min
2- learn basic arpeggios and use them 15 min

5 techniques
1-vibrato 5 min
2 - tapping 15 min
3 - speed picking 15 min
4- legato 10 min

6 Sign reading
1- learn quavers etc and sight read 10 min

7 Ear training
1- learn part of a song by ear 15 min
2- create a song 15 min

4 hours😖


Please feedback
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Nov 6, 2014,
#7
Quote by Guitar137335
Here's my complete routine
1 right hand
1- warmup - pick every string open for at least 2 minutes each.(pick in different places)
Then play scales on one string, then 2 use metronome 15 min
2-adjacent strings- pick chord and pick all down or all up. Then down and up.
Then two notes per string etc 15 min
3-non adjacent strings- do the same above but string skip. 5 min
4-then hybird picking chords 10 min

2 Left hand
1-spider exercise 10 min
2-play thrills with all fingers 10 min
3-ladder finger exercise 10 min
4-chormatic up and down the neck. 10 min
5-Permutations 10 min

3 Scales
1-major scale on one string 25 min
2-then the same on 2 strings then 3 etc 25 min
3-practice three note per strings scales and play with backing track 20 min
4- modes 10 min

4 Chords and arpeggios
1- learn chords from other lessons 15 min
2- learn basic arpeggios and use them 15 min

5 techniques
1-vibrato 5 min
2 - tapping 15 min
3 - speed picking 15 min
4- legato 10 min

6 Sign reading
1- learn quavers etc and sight read 10 min

7 Ear training
1- learn part of a song by ear 15 min
2- create a song 15 min

4 hours😖


Please feedback


There's already good advice in this thread so I won't add new ideas. However, I have a question for you. Why the strict time limits on everything?

When I used to practice for several hours a day I never concerned myself with sticking with anything for a set amount of time. I just practiced what I wanted to work on until I felt I couldn't go any further with it for that moment. Then I would move on to something else.

So, I'm just curious as to why you think those time limits are good, and what you feel you will accomplish because of them.
#8
I did it yesterday and the time limits went out the window, so I'm just going to use them as rough guide lines. It was more for what needed more work.
#9
Hi Guitar137335,

Your practise schedule looks good and there is load of great advice on here about how you can improve it. I think the time limits are a great idea so that you make sure you are making progress in all of the different areas.

If the practise times went out the window yesterday you could use a timer for each item? How did you find the practise schedule as a whole?
#10
I had the timer on the first one but went way over it. But if am more strict I think it could work. I didn't find boring tbh, but it was my first time so will see how it gets over time😊 and I tried to tie it in with songs etc. I tried to do it so it didn't feel like I was practicing lol
I found the sight reading and chords the most boring. I also tried to break it up and played some songs inbetween etc
#11
Avoiding boredom, while practicing scales, chords, etc., seems to be my biggest challenge.
I like the idea of interspersing the mundane with songs. Focusing on technique seems to chase away the boredom for awhile. Also practicing in different areas of the house (bedroom, den , front porch, even the park) seems to help.
Again, I do like the idea of breaking out in some simple melody, maybe some improv on a Johnny Cash tune like "Walk the Line" (which has torn my attention from solid body electrics to acoustic guitars), or some funky licks from songs like, "Tell Me Something Good", "Play That Funky Music White Boy", and stuff I like to call, "pole dancing music":
"Supermassive Black Hole", "Sex on Fire", and such.
My practice routine has been too structured!
A ridiculously simple, though stellar idea. Thanks!
#12
Have you heard of random practise schedules? I find it really helps me when practising, especially with tasks like sight reading which take mental effort. The basic idea is that if you plan to spend 15 minutes on one area each day (i.e sight reading) you would get more benefit by doing 3 x 5 minutes on sight reading interspersed with other activities. There is a study and if you are interested then check out this article: http://www.bulletproofmusician.com/why-the-progress-in-the-practice-room-seems-to-disappear-overnight/

(I have no affiliation with the website, or its products.) :-)