#1
I think a line mixer is what i need but i will explain what i want to do first.

My zoom g3 arrived (yay) and i want it to work in two separate set-ups.

Set-up number 1:
My Roland micro-cube has a line-in jack that bypasses the preamp. I usually plug my phone into it and it plays undistorted music through the speaker.
Now I also have a Zoom G3 which I'd like to be able to plug into that same plug. In that way it would be sort of like using the micro-cube as a powered monitor - right?
But what if I want to use my phone and my Zoom at the same time? Problem! Only one input jack.
So a line mixer is probably the best solution to this minor problem, right? Is there a cheaper way that will still sound okay?
If I'm going to buy a line mixer, what products should i look at? Low price would be important to me, but not if it's a total piece of crap.

Set-up number 2:
Until I can get a proper cab (recommendations?) I am planning to have the following signal path:
Guitar to Zoom G3
Zoom G3 to my home-made tube power-amp
Tube power amp output to the speaker in a small Kustom 16w combo.

So given that scenario - does the average line-mixer process the signal at all? Are there Line Mixers that are also an eq? Do they boost signal at all? (might be desirable to me) Would a line mixer be okay to run directly into the input of my tube amp? (I guess this is an impedance matching question...)
I'm hoping to hear that the input of my amp would "see" it as functionally identical to a preamp or something along those lines.


So like I said; I think a Line Mixer is what I'm needing but I am almost completely naive about the topic.

And if you're interested in recommending a cab - I'm pretty sure that I only have space for a single 12". I was thinking that the Valve Jr. extension cab would be perfect for me but I'm open to similar products if anyone has any good ideas.
#2
Yes you need a line mixer for what you want to do.

Though...
Unless you absolutely want to play with a backing track on the cube, you might as well not get anything since the G3 already has a line out which you could plug into the cube.

If on the other hand you want that absolutely you might get a full featured, even though possibly small, mixer, 'cause they come in pretty handy in lotsa situations.
Live especially, though still, and it's something I'd rather have than a plain line mixer.

The average line mixer boosts the signal, 'cause mixing signals requires attenuating them and you would want a considerable level at the end of the mixing process.

Active line mixers usually have EQ's, yeah.

Running a line out into a hi-z in would remove some high end, but it'll be alright.

I'd get a mackie 802vlz4 (402 if you're tighter on money).

As for the cab, if it needs to be a 1x12 I'd get one of the mesa's with c90 speakers.
The eminence custom one in the vjr cab is fairly dark to compensate for the amp's high end a bit.
#3
Quote by Spambot_2
Yes you need a line mixer for what you want to do.

Though...
Unless you absolutely want to play with a backing track on the cube, you might as well not get anything since the G3 already has a line out which you could plug into the cube.

If on the other hand you want that absolutely you might get a full featured, even though possibly small, mixer, 'cause they come in pretty handy in lotsa situations.
Live especially, though still, and it's something I'd rather have than a plain line mixer.

The average line mixer boosts the signal, 'cause mixing signals requires attenuating them and you would want a considerable level at the end of the mixing process.

Active line mixers usually have EQ's, yeah.

Running a line out into a hi-z in would remove some high end, but it'll be alright.

I'd get a mackie 802vlz4 (402 if you're tighter on money).

As for the cab, if it needs to be a 1x12 I'd get one of the mesa's with c90 speakers.
The eminence custom one in the vjr cab is fairly dark to compensate for the amp's high end a bit.



Thank you so much.

I experimented with the Zoom and my speaker set-ups today. No line-mixer of course.

I've come to a few disappointing conclusions, but nothing I can't work around:

1. I have to scroll through menus to change the volume every time. (Yes I think a Line-driver would help)

2. Level matching between 8 million devices is a pain. 8 million is just an estimate of course.

3. The Kustom speaker is not good. I expected it to be not so good, but it's really really not good. I get better sound out of the Roland micro-cube.

4. My tube amp does sound cool if I push a big enough signal into it, but I wish I would've remembered that my 6L6 output tubes are not the same as what's in a million other amps. When I use the Fender Twin or Deluxe models on my Zoom, remove cab simulation and turn the gain way way down but the level up, then I can push my tube amp to the point where I get some nice natural tube distortion. Awesome. But if I try the same trick with the Marshall models it doesn't work right.
Ugh.
#4
That's the thing about multifx. A zillion optional configurations that can sound bad, and a few that sound great. On the Zoom you should be able to adjust the volume on the amp sim without scrolling through menus. IIRC you have global and patch level settings in the menus. It can be a pain to get the right default choices, but there is a lot of flexibility. The drawback of so much flexibility is it can be confusing, and you can spend a lot of time learning.

If you like using the drum machine then a more "PA like" monitor you get with the MP3 input is better than a guitar cab.
#5
TS, sounds like you need to simplify, you're going in circles with some marginal and not so good devices so don't expect wonders. I think you need to buy mixer w/ powered speakers or powered monitors, stick to one modeler and call it a day. Your tube amp I guess could be used to liven up the modeler when needed but I'd probably won't even use that for the most part.
#6
On another note - can't you try the Cube speaker with your tube amp?
Saw pics of the Zoom, it is more of the small pedal variety so I'm confused how you can get good results.
I might do a powered speaker setup around better moideler, in this case you probably need decent clean amp, your tube amp might do with better speaker.
Personally, I'd flush the whole setup on EBay and start again.
#7
Quote by diabolical
On another note - can't you try the Cube speaker with your tube amp?
Saw pics of the Zoom, it is more of the small pedal variety so I'm confused how you can get good results.
I might do a powered speaker setup around better moideler, in this case you probably need decent clean amp, your tube amp might do with better speaker.
Personally, I'd flush the whole setup on EBay and start again.



This is one of those times when the correct answer isn't as much fun as the interesting answer. You're right. It would be so much easier and so tempting to buy myself the tube vyper I always wanted and be done with it.
But I learned a hell of a lot today, and that's half the reason I did it.

I'm satisfied with the Micro-Cube for what it is. It's a very portable practice amp and I've also been using it to amplify music from my phone when I'm working in the house. I only paid 20 bucks for it too. :-D I made the tube amp from scrap parts. The housing for it was originally for a space heater. The power transformer was originally used in some piece of industrial equipment. The tube bases were scavenged from an old PA system. I think I spent maybe 40 bucks on it. The Kustom combo sucks, but it was my first real amp and I think I spent 30$ on it too.

I think the Zoom is fine. I would really like to plug it in to a real amp or a good PA system before I do anything. The first set-up that I described above actually sounded pretty decent. The Roland speaker is full-range, and there is a stage of clean amplification applied to the aux-input signals making it essentially a powered speaker. (albeit a small one that doesn't get particularly loud).


I say the right answer for me is to forget about my tube amp for now. I will improve the circuit later. That also removes the need for a guitar cab.

If the Micro-cube is loud enough (and i think it will be) then I will use that as my powered Speaker.
I'll use the Zoom for its intended purpose.

And I'll look into that line-mixer. I get a 200 tool allowance at the end of the year, so i should be able to get one then.
Thanks for help!
#8
Quote by fly135
That's the thing about multifx. A zillion optional configurations that can sound bad, and a few that sound great. On the Zoom you should be able to adjust the volume on the amp sim without scrolling through menus. IIRC you have global and patch level settings in the menus. It can be a pain to get the right default choices, but there is a lot of flexibility. The drawback of so much flexibility is it can be confusing, and you can spend a lot of time learning.

If you like using the drum machine then a more "PA like" monitor you get with the MP3 input is better than a guitar cab.



I did find the global volume. it helps. Still not as easy as a volume knob, but i won't complain.
It will be better once i get the patches sorted out I think. the volume difference between different patches is obnoxious.
#9
Quote by paul.housley.7

It will be better once i get the patches sorted out I think. the volume difference between different patches is obnoxious.


Pretty much all of them are like that when it comes to the factory settings. Just start creating your own right away, that's what I did on my GT-10 but still it is annoying when I take it to jam sessions and the guys want me to try a different sound and I have to find one and tame it.
#10
Quote by paul.housley.7
I did find the global volume. it helps. Still not as easy as a volume knob, but i won't complain.
It will be better once i get the patches sorted out I think. the volume difference between different patches is obnoxious.
As you found there is a level control in Global. But if you go to "Total" there is a level control for the patch. If you have an amp sim there should be a level control that is immediately accessible without going to the menus.

People complain about level differences between patches on every multifx known to man.
#11
2.5 Hours later and I've got 15 usable patches of roughly equal levels. Woof!

I cheated a little bit. I downloaded 12 of those off the internet. I did learn some things from watching how those effects chains were arranged, and I was able to use that to create a few "clean-ish" tones to go along with my modern rock and metallica-ish downloads.
It wasn't that bad really. I'm still working on a few of the patches but all in all I've got 15 decent sounds where I previously only had 5.

But I really like the rhythm machine. I am curious about how other people feel about them. I got the impression that they're not used much. Did I read that wrong?
If they're not being used, why not?
#12
I use the rhythm machine with the looper all the time. Love it.
#13
Oh my word! I've never experienced that before. Felt like making real music.

I did a chord progression over a rhythm track and got it in the looper.
That sentence is probably an average day of practice for somma you guys but for me it's a milestone.

Then I figured i might as well try to figure out what the minor pentatonic is good for.
And all kinds of stuff clicked for me just now.

I didn't know the key of the progression but there was only one spot on the fretboard that sounded right. (B)
And it really sounded right.
And as long as you stay within the box it all sounded like it belonged to the song.
It felt like cheating!
#14
That's the experience I had. Lay down some rhythm and start noodling over it. Finding the notes that match the key and getting into a groove. Before you know it you are making music like you could never before.