#1
Hello,
I've been browsing around various guitar stores and whenever I see someone testing a guitar at a store, they're doing crazy solos, shreds, and riffs that they seem to have made up.
How can I learn to do this?
Here's an example: http://youtu.be/DLOWsiNQLt8?t=3m53s
Thanks
#2
They have a guitar at home. They took months to work out some crazy shred solos. They practiced them for 8 hours everyday. And they did all this simply so that they could then go around all the guitar stores in the city and try to look cool in front of other customers.
#3
Quote by 20Tigers
They have a guitar at home. They took months to work out some crazy shred solos. They practiced them for 8 hours everyday. And they did all this simply so that they could then go around all the guitar stores in the city and try to look cool in front of other customers.




Don't learn Crazy Train, Stairway to Heaven, and Eruption (usual favorites) just to show off at a music store. Learn them to increase your dexterity, playing speed, and general understanding of music. I'd also suggest to learn many other styles of music, but that is another topic.

Whenever anyone plays anything on any instrument in a music store, the reason should be to test the equipment they are playing or as a professional demonstration. As such, it is beneficial to use many different techniques to see the full capability of the equipment: full chords, triads, single intervals, individual notes, riffing, licking, shredding, etc. Showing off in the generic sense limits you to just a few of those techniques, and labels you as a punk who doesn't know how to try out gear.
Last edited by Will Lane at Nov 6, 2014,
#4
Most annoying thing ever! A bunch of squids trying to show off their hot schizzle in a music store. Just plain lame.
#6
The one "store tune" I got sick of was the intro to VH, "Jump".

Every keyboardist in the Nation, visited my stores.
#7
That was terrible. Don't learn to play like the guys in the video. It sounds cool for maybe 30 seconds but after that it just gets annoying.

To be able to play your own stuff, you need to write it. You can of course come up with some riffs/melodies on the fly and that's called improvisation. But you'll learn to do that by playing a lot. Learn what other guitarists do. That way you'll get some "vocabulary" and it helps you with coming up with your own stuff.

But yeah, people don't usually play that stuff to impress other people (at least when they are trying a new guitar or amp). They are playing it to figure out if they like the guitar or the amp. They play stuff they are comfortable with. It doesn't matter what the stuff you are comfortable with is. If it is Metallica riffs, play Metallica riffs. You are the one trying the product so you are allowed to play whatever you want to play. You want to know if the amp/guitar works for you. And that's why you want to play the stuff you usually play. You are not there to impress other people. If you are, you should get out.

I know the guys playing in the video weren't trying equipment. They were having a guitar battle (and it was a show - I mean, there were all these lights behind them and people were there to listen to them). That's not what you should do in a music store. Try whatever you want to try by playing stuff you like playing. Because you are trying the gear for you. It doesn't need to be fancy. You just want to figure out if the guitar/amp works for your style.
#9
Main thing to remember is that it's a store, not a youth club. It doesn't matter what you play as the only reason you're playing in a store is to evaluate a potential purchase, so you play whatever you're able to play to help you make that decision. You're not playing for other people so there's no reason to be concerned with what other people might hear.

Making a nuisance of yourself in someone's place of business just so you can show off to your friends, or worse, complete strangers is incredibly bad manners. That goes double for smaller stores, larger stores like guitar centre are admittedly pretty much zoos now and probably beyond saving. However small stores need every bit of business they can get, they can't afford to lose a potential customer walking out because of some bellend treating the place like an open mic club.

So forget about "guitar store riffs" , be polite, respectful and build a good relationship with your local store by buying stuff regularly. If you'd like to try out a guitar you can't afford or don't want to buy then ask nicely and be honest.
#11
Well them sounding good is very, very subjective for a large variety of reasons. To me, they sound mediocre. Their melodies are very mediocre.

As far as how they did it? Finding information/ resources , then practicing a lot. Also IMO, the more musically educated one is, especially in classical music and piano...the better a guitar player one will be. If you love music and have musical goals, there is nothing stopping you from getting where you want to be. Just keep working at it.

But I should warn you, if you do not see progress after a year...you may want to seek out something that can help you out. You do not want to be wasting 10 years noodling around and hoping to magically wake up one day and be playing like a pro...
Last edited by Unreal T at Nov 8, 2014,