#1
Hi folks,

I'm an older guy looking to learn drums. Couldn't afford the electronic kit, so I'm going try to build my own. It seems that maybe the hardest part will be trying to find a brain that isn't too expensive but isn't a kids toy either. The cheapest thing I've seen so far I think was the Alesis SR16. I'm wondering if anyone has a suggestion to offer for an inexpensive brain, new or used. I also saw the info on making an arduino based brain. Any suggestions or info appreciated!
#3
I struggled for a while with doing a home-made edrum kit with the same goal; I ended up giving up ultimately, and stuck to my acoustic kit!

However, I recently got into full-set live drum recording, and stumbled upon an interesting idea to this extent: a hybrid acoustic/electric approach. The "brain" of the operation is simply your computer/laptop running some kind of drum sampling software (e.g., Slate Trigger or similar). Then, simply mic up solid surfaces to act as your surrogate "drums" and "cymbals." You can get away with using a low-end multichannel interface and relatively cheap mics as all you need is a way to capture the signal. What's more, with a program like Trigger, you can achieve robust velocity response for dynamic playing (this was a big issue I faced with replicating when I dabbled in Arduino-based, piezo triggered drums).

Here's a YouTube video I stumbled about a while ago that demonstrates the idea I outlined above:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8uj_oB3Noc

Hope this helps or at least inspires some creative thinking!
#4
The reason for him saying that is that changing temperatures can cause the wood to warp, leading to bad stuff like not being able to fit heads on, uneven bearing edges etc. which will ruin the sound of the drums.

However I would say he's overreacting, since the temperature change shouldn't be that big except for overnight, and even then if the cases are insulated it should be fine
ali