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#1
Hi, my first post here. My son is 12 and I cant get him away from his electric guitar. So he turns 13 tomorrow (Nov 7) and I got him some pedals. I bought the OCD from Guitar Center for 127.00 and then bought two more from CL, DS-1 that I plan to mod (Keeley), and a MXR Classic distortion. Paid 30.00 bucks each for the CL pedals. I'm thinking of taking back the the OCD to GC and give the other two pedals. I'm in no way guitar savvy. I don't play and don't know the the first thing about pedals or effects or amps or just about anything to do with guitars. I do know tube amps are favorable and costly. Right now he has a practice amp and a J.Reynolds guitar that I picked up from CL for 40.00. The guitar looks brand new, the amp not so much but it works.

His music taste is 70's super bands, classic rock i.e. Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Who, Queen, Hendrix, just to name a few. He's been trying to play licks from these bands since he got the guitar a couple of months ago. He knows the albums better than I do, scary. We have 15th row seats for The Who next year. He about peed himself when he found out I got tickets. It'll be my second time seeing them, my first was when John Enthwistle was still alive, just missed Keith Moon.

When I look through CL ads, there are a ton of amps on there. I have no idea besides going to ebay and seeing what the sold price is. I'm not sure what would be suitalbe for him. He's also getting an acustic guitar. I'm picking up a Washburn EA26 from a buddy at work, he's asking 250.00, my guess is that I'll get my money back if I decide to sell it. I've seen Craig Chaquico a couple of times and really like the sound of that guitar. I have a few of his CD's as well. I apologize for the lengthy post, but I'm venturing into unknown waters and forums are a great place to get 1001 opinions on one subject.

So my question is: What amp would be suitable for a 13 year old who absolutely loves playing his electric and soon acoustic guitars? What pedals should I hold on too? What would stack well? Other pedals I should consider? Big Muff Pi (he loves Hendrix)?

This is worse than my fishing gear. I feel like I'm becoming a guitar gear junkie already!!

Thanks for taking the time to read, Dave
#3
That's very cool of you Dave, ug'll set you straight, lotsa very helpful, seasoned guitarists here (amongst other jackasses like me here, who mean well).

Budget would be good to know. Imo, before more pedals, a proper amp and guitar would be best. Guitar and amp are kinda personal though, it'd probably be best to let him decide those when its time. A multifx makes for a good first pedal, imo. The fx aren't as good as individual pedals in the majority of cases but they're perfect as an introduction and overview of a variety of different common fx, sorta like a sampler platter.


There's a very good, yet very wallet friendly multifx pedal called the Zoom G3 or G3x or G5. Its a very effective practice gadget. It has a looper, which helps for practicing scales, timing, lead playing, etc, plus its a lotta fun for any guitarist to use. It has a metronome but in the form of dozens of different drumbeats. Dozens of different fx and amp models, usb. Its extremely easy to use too, just an awesome, effective, practice gadget
Last edited by lucky1978 at Nov 7, 2014,
#4
Sort out the amp first. Guitar and amp are the foundations. Everything else is trimming.
#5
Yeah I just got my zoom G3 and it is awesome for practice. If you want to encourage him the Zoom is a great choice.

Don't get too caught up in the discussions that go on here.There's a lot of people who crap all over certain brands or types of gear. It's true that a tube amp sounds better, but is a tube amp appropriate for a 12 year-old? Maybe, maybe not.

If you're willing to spend 170-200 bucks then you can get a brand new Zoom G3.
If you're willing to spend 250-300 then you should be able to find a Peavey tube Vypyr. That's a hybrid amp that has tubes plus amp models and effects all in one.
If you really want a cheap but good tube amp then you could get a Peavey Valveking. They're frequently recommended here.

There's tons of possible choices but that short list should get you started. I would recommend the Zoom myself. I paid 120$ for a used one.
#6
Quote by paul.housley.7
Yeah I just got my zoom G3 and it is awesome for practice. If you want to encourage him the Zoom is a great choice.

Don't get too caught up in the discussions that go on here.There's a lot of people who crap all over certain brands or types of gear. It's true that a tube amp sounds better, but is a tube amp appropriate for a 12 year-old? Maybe, maybe not.

If you're willing to spend 170-200 bucks then you can get a brand new Zoom G3.
If you're willing to spend 250-300 then you should be able to find a Peavey tube Vypyr. That's a hybrid amp that has tubes plus amp models and effects all in one.
If you really want a cheap but good tube amp then you could get a Peavey Valveking. They're frequently recommended here.

There's tons of possible choices but that short list should get you started. I would recommend the Zoom myself. I paid 120$ for a used one.


i think the vypyr tube would be perfect for him, but again i am unsure of your budget.
#8
Check this out:
https://reverb.com/item/308965-fender-vibro-champ-xd-black?_aid=pla&pla=1&gclid=CP_btYj358ECFYFqfgodvUcAcA

This amp does 60s-70s classic rock tone very well and Townsend, Gilmour, May, Jimmy Page, Hendrix, Clapton can all be found in here within reason. It does not go down to metal town for my money but everything else is awfully good for $150 used. A lotta bang for the buck and I rehearse with it's bigger brother the Superchamp XD regularly.

Decent demo- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehD3TgcE5G8

Worth a look.
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 7, 2014,
#9
classic rock for a beginner then look for a used peavey valveking 112. they can be found for $200 or less and will be a good enough amp to last him for years to come as he learns. the valveking is good enough for use in a band as well (for down the road).

as mentioned pedals are kinda the icing on the cake and with only 2 months of playing under his belt learning to play is way more important than pedals. down the road a Wha would be an essential pedal for classic rock. at this point though a solid amp and perhaps an overdrive (if amp is tube) is all he really needs.

I play much of what you mentioned and my board is fairly simple. Wha >Overdive > Delay > Phaser (Fuzz instead of Overdrive for Hendrix) this will cover most rock situations from the late 60s to the late 70s. Fuzz for 60s stuff and some 70s but this can be a can of worms as one fuzz wont nail all the desired tones (Hendrix is a fuzz face vs say Gilmour who mainly used a big muff vs jimmy page who used a tonebender on the early stuff etc) my advice is to keep it simple to begin with and learn to get the most out of little before going nuts trying to get every tone.
#10
I'm afraid that I might have failed to communicate properly with my first post, so please let me have a do-over. :-p

First - I'm probably the least experienced person here, so you should feel free to put my opinions about tone in their rightful place.
My recommendation was intended to point out the utility of rhythm tracks, (or metronomes) loopers (though he might not be able to use them effectively right away) and patches.

A looper is a recorder that loops. You record yourself doing a chord progression (for example) and the looper will keep playing it back for you so that you can play a lead guitar part over it.
A patch is a collection of amp simulations and effects that makes a sound that's - um... - somewhere in the vicinity of the guitar sound in some famous song. So you could have a "Layla" patch for example that's designed to make you sound like Eric Clapton.

The least wasteful solution is probably the one where you buy the tube amp and the individual pedals. When I say least wasteful I mean you're not buying anything that he'll outgrow.

The cheapest short term solution - and he almost certainly will outgrow these pieces of equipment - would be to purchase a used combo modeling amp. The Vox VT series is popular and can probably get the sort of tones your kid likes. It'll have built-in sounds and the ability to make patches. If he wants a looper you'll have to get one separately.

An intermediate solution that might last him for a long time is the tube Vypyr that was mentioned before. It's going to cost more upfront and for the price of a tube Vypyr (a hybrid tube amp, half tubes and half solid-state) you could get a real tube amp.
It'll have patches and it'll also have enough volume and sound quality that he could use it to play shows.

The Zoom G3 is a jack-of-all-trades practice tool that can also be used to record (to a computer via USB) and you could run it into a PA system and use it in place of an amp.
It's a really cool device and it has more features than any of the other devices that have been mentioned here, but it seems like many of the serious and even pseudo-serious guitar players eventually out-grow it. It also adds an extra layer of complexity that might be too much for a beginner. Finally - it doesn't have a speaker and it doesn't drive a speaker. You can't use it by itself. You'd either need some headphones or a powered speaker of some sort. You can also run it into a guitar amp of course.
#11
You are so right.....budget. Sorry I forgot that part. 300.00 for now. He really want's an acoustic guitar, my buddy just dropped off the Washburn EA26, beautiful guitar. So the amp will probably be a good xmas gift for him, that gives me time to look. I'm taking the Washburn to get appraised, he quoted me the lowest ebay sold price minus 50.00 for a ding in the neck. There are no EA26's on ebay right now, I'll be going to a couple of local shops and get appraisals. I'll go over to the acoustic section and ask some questions.

Thanks all for the responses, evidently I'm in the right forum, got some quick and informative responses, always a good thing.

I'll be looking into the following equipment:
Peavey Valveking 112
Zoom G3

Pedals will be down the road. Thanks for leading me in the right direction. I had no idea amps were for so versatile without pedals. Well, I might give him "a" pedal just to mess around with for now. Will a pedal be ok on a practice amp till I get him a decent amp? I'm thinking the Boss DS-1 or the mxr classic distortion. I picked them up for 30.00 ea, not a budget breaker.

Thanks again guys!
#12
The pedals will work with the practice amp.

You will find, however, that some pedals will sound better with certain amps. One pedal may interact with one amp really well, whereas a similar pedal will not. That is one of the reasons for the guitarist's endless quest for tone .
#13
Quote by Myshadow46_2
The pedals will work with the practice amp.

You will find, however, that some pedals will sound better with certain amps. One pedal may interact with one amp really well, whereas a similar pedal will not. That is one of the reasons for the guitarist's endless quest for tone .

Gear junkies beware!
#14
My thoughts on the matter.

Since he is soon only 13 years old without an income of his own does he really need a tube amp? Now, lets face it, tube amps are fricking awesome. There is just something how those little glass bottles richen the sound and Valveking is a good bang for the buck. Good distortion channel (considering the price point) and fantastic cleans (even without considering price point, its just damn good) but since he has no income of his own the future tube replacements are out of your wallet.

Now preamp tubes, unless one malfunctions, last a really really long time but power tubes, the big bottles and also more expensive ones, last about couple of years of active use and some abuse. Now, a matched pair of cheap chinese Shuguang 6L6 tubes are about 20$ but when he is in uni and gets a money of his own from flipping burgers and the choice is to buy new tubes that just happened to die or food for few days there is no contest: A pack of beer wins every time and practice be damned.

Also Valveking is quite loud. Now, it does have a perfectly functional volume knob and I used a 100W in apartment building for a year but it is a sensitive one. Volume ramps up really fast when you even touch the volume knob. 50W and 100W are not that different in this regard.


Personally I would get a solid state modeling amp Peavey Vypyr 75 or one of the new Vypyr VIP's, the higher wattage ones. A Vypyr tube, which is discontinued, is better but again its a tube amp with same possible question marks as Valveking.

Solid state version is good and has a wide range of amp models and effects to choose from. Much more versatile than Valveking which is just an amp without bells and whistles. A higher wattage version of Vypyr is just fine for low volume practice and possible band practice in the future too. Thanks to two volume knobs sensitivity is not a problem and whisper volumes are easy to achieve.
#15
Quote by Grumpy_one
You are so right.....budget. Sorry I forgot that part. 300.00 for now. He really want's an acoustic guitar, my buddy just dropped off the Washburn EA26, beautiful guitar. So the amp will probably be a good xmas gift for him, that gives me time to look. I'm taking the Washburn to get appraised, he quoted me the lowest ebay sold price minus 50.00 for a ding in the neck. There are no EA26's on ebay right now, I'll be going to a couple of local shops and get appraisals. I'll go over to the acoustic section and ask some questions.

Thanks all for the responses, evidently I'm in the right forum, got some quick and informative responses, always a good thing.

I'll be looking into the following equipment:
Peavey Valveking 112
Zoom G3

Pedals will be down the road. Thanks for leading me in the right direction. I had no idea amps were for so versatile without pedals. Well, I might give him "a" pedal just to mess around with for now. Will a pedal be ok on a practice amp till I get him a decent amp? I'm thinking the Boss DS-1 or the mxr classic distortion. I picked them up for 30.00 ea, not a budget breaker.

Thanks again guys!


if you go with the Valveking a distortion pedal won't be needed. an overdrive would be a way better way to go. now as mentioned the VK 112 I suggested is a 50 watt tube amp which can get very loud very fast so keep that in mind. I live in a townhouse (glorified apt. if you ask me) and practice using my VK 112 with an overdrive. while the amp at low volumes doesn't give you the full effect it works just fine for practice. as mentioned down the road he can use it in a band situation. the VK is a decent amp and will as I mentioned before serve him well for years to come. I use a Peavey Ultra 212 for live applications however would have no problem going with the VK if needed. it's far from a top of the line amp but works very well especially for classic rock style music.
#16
how loudly can he play?

considering he likes the classic stuff, and considering you have a bunch of dirt pedals there already, one of the cheap 5 watt tube amps might be worth a look- vht special 6 (or special 6 ultra), vox ac4 (i haven't tried that one), etc. He can use the pedals for dirt (or crank the amp if he can play loudly), and they're not too expensive, but still tube (and they don't need to be biased when retubing, and most only take two tubes anyway so retubing costs are minimised).

I haven't tried the mxr classic distortion. i'm not sure what it is, but the '78 badass mxr was a glorified DS1, so I wonder if the classic might be a ds1 as well. if so, you could return either it or the ds1 (probably the mxr, because as you rightly said, there are tons of freely available mods out there for the DS1 which will have instructions etc. online).

of course, the classic distortion might well not be a ds1 clone.

i'd hang onto the ocd

a muff is nice but i'd say (most- he used several fuzz pedals) hendrix is more like a fuzz face
#17
I appreciate your enthusiasm to encourage your son, but I think the whole thing is overkill. IMO, he doesn't need an expensive tube amp and he doesn't need a lot of fancy gear that might distract him from the basic business of learning to play. If he really is keen to learn, he will do it on just about anything that is playable and suits his genre interests. I would go for an inexpensive guitar - of which there are many good ones - and a basic modelling amp, plus a good set up and some lessons with a teacher whose interests coincides with his. In fact the teacher could well be the best person to advise on gear. I think that would be money better spent than on fancy gear that he might decide isn't his cup of tea in six months time.
#19
Quote by Grumpy_one
Is the Peavey Vypyr 15W worth checking out?



Personally I'd check out the 30W model just to get a proper 12" speaker.
#20
Quote by MaaZeus
Personally I'd check out the 30W model just to get a proper 12" speaker.


This is a real question, not rhetorical. - Will that matter if he is only playing at bedroom volumes?

How would the Peavey compare with a Roland Cube? - A long-time favourite among modelling amps. From a platform of near- ignorance that is the one I would choose.
#22
The problem with trying to cut cost corners at this stage in the game is the fact that you really don't save yourself much money.

I got a Roland micro-cube for 20 bucks. If you could find that deal then I'd say jump all over it. But I have never seen a comparable amp in my area for anywhere near that price. It's a once in a blue moon kind of deal.

A 30w Vypyr is probably 100-150 bucks minimum, and it has a limited span of usefulness. This is an apples and oranges type of comparison if you really want to get down to it.

Here is some affordable gear that is better than what he needs right now, but you can definitely keep:
-Peavey Valveking
-Pedals

Here is affordable gear that is better for a new player, but he'll probably grow out of it:
-Any solid state modeling amp (with the possible exception of a very small and portable one like the micro-cube)
-The tiny tube amps (Vox AC4, VHT Special 6, etc...) But these have their own unique charms and might be worth keeping if he really likes them.

And then there's this stuff:
-Zoom G3
-Tube Vypyr

The zoom is small enough and versatile enough that you might want to keep it even if you don't care for the amp sims. The tube vypyr is the best modeling amp that you can get within this price range.


So you can get a Valveking for 250, get a Zoom later for 150 and he'd have every need covered. The end.
Or you can pay 150 for a Vypyr 30. Only to find out 2 years from now that it can't do the things he wants it to do and end up buying the Valveking and the Zoom anyways.

That's why I say that if you're going to get a solid state modeling amp, you should either use the Zoom itself through a powered speaker, or a Micro-cube sized device because it's really easy to carry, and portability is reason enough to keep it.
Last edited by paul.housley.7 at Nov 7, 2014,
#23
Quote by Tony Done
In fact the teacher could well be the best person to advise on gear.


I dunno, there have been a lot of threads over the years where someone came in saying his/her teacher advised certain gear, and (at least based on the evidence of threads here) the advice was pretty terrible, at least in my opinion.

A good teacher knows about guitar player, but there's no guarantee he/she knows about gear. And even if he/she does, that teacher will be prone to biases and preferences just like any other player...

Quote by paul.housley.7

I got a Roland micro-cube for 20 bucks. If you could find that deal then I'd say jump all over it. But I have never seen a comparable amp in my area for anywhere near that price. It's a once in a blue moon kind of deal.

A 30w Vypyr is probably 100-150 bucks minimum, and it has a limited span of usefulness. This is an apples and oranges type of comparison if you really want to get down to it.

Here is some affordable gear that is better than what he needs right now, but you can definitely keep:
-Peavey Valveking
-Pedals

Here is affordable gear that is better for a new player, but he'll probably grow out of it:
-Any solid state modeling amp (with the possible exception of a very small and portable one like the micro-cube)
-The tiny tube amps (Vox AC4, VHT Special 6, etc...) But these have their own unique charms and might be worth keeping if he really likes them.

And then there's this stuff:
-Zoom G3
-Tube Vypyr

The zoom is small enough and versatile enough that you might want to keep it even if you don't care for the amp sims. The tube vypyr is the best modeling amp that you can get within this price range.


So you can get a Valveking for 250, get a Zoom later for 150 and he'd have every need covered. The end.
Or you can pay 150 for a Vypyr 30. Only to find out 2 years from now that it can't do the things he wants it to do and end up buying the Valveking and the Zoom anyways.

That's why I say that if you're going to get a solid state modeling amp, you should either use the Zoom itself through a powered speaker, or a Micro-cube sized device because it's really easy to carry, and portability is reason enough to keep it.


Yeah. That's what I was thinking (though I'm not as well up on the more high-tech gear options which are around these days for home playing). I got a vox mini3 even after i had "better" tube amps, because it was handy, portable and small (and sounded pretty good), and the microcube is a similar idea. (You got a crazy good deal on yours. ) You could make a pretty good argument that it might still be useful even after you get better amps.

You could of course say the same about a vypyr 30 or similar (I haven't tried the vypyr 30), and it may well sound a bit better than the microcube or mini 3- but it loses out because it's a lot bigger (so takes up room which might no longer be available once you get another amp) and isn't portable.

The other thing is, if you have a fair idea of the type of tones you want, and they don't need massively different types of amps (as in this case), considering you already have a couple of pedals, and considering those tones were made on tube amps, a tube amp (at least one of the smaller, cheaper ones) might make more sense.

A lot of this is a judgement call, though, I certainly don't have all the answers. I still buy stupid stuff all the time.
#24
Quote by Dave_Mc


A lot of this is a judgement call, though, I certainly don't have all the answers. I still buy stupid stuff all the time.


c'mon dave you buy stupid stuff, now that's just crazy talk.
#25
Yeah, a 12" speaker just sounds better. It won't be long before he wants to jam with his mates and the Vyper 30 at least has a shot at pulling that off.

The Cubes are good but again, it's a speaker thing. With the Rolands you have to get up into the 80W ones before you get a 12" speaker.
#26
^ yeah even before considering the speaker, with the cubes (excepting the micro cube) you have to go up to the 30/40 watt versions to get the decent amp modelling(depending on the age, the older ones were 30W, the newer ones seem to be 40). that's a pretty big achilles heel with the cubes- the ones with amp modelling sound good, but you have to pay more than you do with some of its competitors to get that amp modelling. Vox and peavey have amp models on even the smallest and cheapest models. granted they often don't have as many features as the bigger ones (and have a smaller speaker), but still.

it's kind of annoying because any time you say the cube is good you have to point out it's only certain models, which involves a lot more typing

Quote by monwobobbo
c'mon dave you buy stupid stuff, now that's just crazy talk.


haha
#27
Are you in the US?

If so, keep an eye on this. If I were you'd I'd place a bid to lock him into the auction. This is the amp you want. Won't be loud enough to jam with a drummer but it's a proper Vox tube amp.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/VOX-Model-AC4C1-guitar-amp-blue-/251707856126?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a9af514fe

Seriously, man. Nobody's bidding on it. They're a mighty little amp.
#28
I wouldn't bother with those pedals as much. They're nice pedals an all, but the base of your tone is an amp and a guitar. Since he loves playing his guitar I would say an VOX AC15 with a Big Muff would be ideal. Now that's a bunch of money to spend, so you could get a cheaper amp like the AC4 combo and get a micro muff.
Last edited by evmac at Nov 7, 2014,
#29
Quote by Tony Done
This is a real question, not rhetorical. - Will that matter if he is only playing at bedroom volumes?

Yes, I'm nearly always at bedroom volume and went from a 2x10 to 2x12. The 2x12 is much fuller sounding.
#30
So summarizing what I've been reading, and it's helped 10 fold, is the tone is basically the guitar and amp (the cake) and pedals are the icing (as someone said earlier). So when do I upgrade from his J.Reynolds? He's wanting the the rock and roll sound of the 70's, the one pedal did help with his practice amp, but I have a feeling cost's are about to be a factor. I'm convinced he's in it for the long haul. So investing in his music venture really isn't going to be an issue, just don't want to break the bank all at once. I'm about to fork over 250-300.00 on a really nice acoustic. I might have gone overboard, but it's a real nice guitar. Considering a new one is around 200 anyway. This one has a pickup too.

I have a good idea about the amp, now lets talk guitars. Probably won't be until next year some time before we look into a nice axe. So this brings on another question: amp or guitar first? Gut tells me amp. Thanks all for the responses so far.
#31
^ pretty much (the icing and cake thing) though for certain types of music effects can be pretty important. and also once you have the cake having some icing is nice as well. (plus effects often sound better with a better amp, too.)

I think the big difference is that with cheaper practice amps, effects tend to be used as a band-aid, to compensate for the amp's shortcomings, whereas with a good amp you're using effects to complement it and make it sound even better, or to get different special effects or tones which the amp can't do by itself. That's how I'd describe it.

amp or guitar, it really depends on which is worse currently. most people would probably say amp, but if the guitar is unplayable, i'd say guitar.
#32
Personally, I think you're better off getting a nice amp first, then a better guitar later. If you have a nice amp, and plug a shitty guitar into it, odds are it'll sound pretty good; but if you buy a really nice guitar, and plug it into a shitty amps, its still going to sound like shit.

Like I said, that's just my opinion, and there's likely some here who will disagree with me.


Edit:

Quote by Dave_Mc

most people would probably say amp, but if the guitar is unplayable, i'd say guitar.


I never thought to mention that.
Last edited by red.guitar at Nov 8, 2014,
#33
^ I would agree up to a point, but it depends on exactly how bad the guitar is.
#34
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ I would agree up to a point, but it depends on exactly how bad the guitar is.


You're too quick on the post, Dave
#36
The guitar is a J.Reynolds, looked brand new when we got it. Took it to guitar center, they said it was in pretty good shape. The amp is old and small. Why my gut says it should be the next upgrade, and for reasons mentioned earlier, lip stick on pig, still a pig.
#37
Yeah, i mean if the guitar is ok and if it's suitable for the type of stuff he plays (I'm not familiar with it), then the amp is a good call.
#38
Peavey Vypyr VIP II would be great. It works with electric, Acoustic and bass, has lots of amp and FX modeling and should keep your son pleased for years
#39
on the guitar the absolute best advice I (or anyone really) is to take him to a guitar shop and let him try whatever they have in your price range. he has to play it and while we can certainly give suggestions, what we may like might not work for him.

keep an open mind. for instance I to play a lot of classic rock/hard rock/metal as I grew up in the 70s. what guitar to play well in theory that's pretty easy Fender Stratocaster or Gibson Les Paul as those were the 2 biggest guitars from that era (pre van halen at least). now a days there re tons of guitars out there that can give you similar sounds so the choices get much more complicated. I have 2 main guitars a Strat and a BC Rich Eagle. the Eagle covers my humbucker/Les Paul needs. not the first guitar you might think of when looking for a 70s sound. I've never really gotten along with LPs playing wise (owned 2 over the years) but the Eagle works for me and has that sound. I'd never even considered that guitar but came across one at GC and gave a try cuzz I'd never played one (which I do often). worked great for me and bam bought it.

at this stage of the game don't get to caught up in gear as your son should be concentrating on his playing which will take time to develop. when practicing I rarely use any fx pedals (except an overdrive sometimes) unless working on a song for a band that requires them.
#40
4 days to go and still no bids on that AC4. Put a bid on it. You could end up getting it for $100 if you're lucky. At that price how could you go wrong?
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