#1
Hey Guys!

First of all, let me say I've googled for quite a bit, but I didn't find the information I was looking for.

I need a 5 string bass. I'm in a band for 5 years now and most of the time my '62 reissue Preci serves me great, but we decided to go harder so I need one more string for about two songs now. Now, I'm playing them one octave higher, which sounds terrible. When playing live I don't have the time to tune down between the songs, so I definitely need either another 4 string or, more preferable, a 5 string.

What I want (importance descending):

-good sound (obviously)
-good playability (nice feeling neck, fretboard and body)
-"innocent" look (not to metal )
-active pickups (preferably)
-active eq
-not to head-heavy

So what would you guys recommend?

I'm student and I'm broke so it shouldn't be too expensive.

Hope someone can help me.


If there are spelling or grammar mistakes, sorry for that
#3
Quote by Spanner93
Ibanez SR *anything ending in a 5* e.g. SR 505

Peavey Millennium AC BXP 5

I'll second this. I will say the stock DX5 pickups that come in some (maybe just older models) sound very bland to me, this is what came in my SR405 but the rest is a great instrument for the price.
#4
Quote by Spanner93
Ibanez SR *anything ending in a 5* e.g. SR 505

Peavey Millennium AC BXP 5


Yeah, the Soundgear series seems to be pretty good from what I've heard. Just checked out the SR 505, pretty much what I was looking for. Even has Bartolini pickups, not something proprietary. Gonna try it out asap.

The Peavey (didn't even know the build basses, thought they only build (quite decent) amps) looks alright as well, but from my research, there's no place nearby (even if I'd travel ~150km) which has the Millennium 5 in stock so I could try it out.

What do you guys think of the Schecter Diamond P? I know Schecter makes brilliant guitars, even their cheaper lineup has great guitars, but I've never heard anything about their basses. Only "review" I found on YouTube was their own product video. Another interesting looking bass I found is the Cort Arona 5 (preferably the open pore one). Heard good stuff about it, it was designed by Sandberg but built in Korea. I've had a bass made by Cort previously, was my first bass. Wasn't bad, but the pickups were awful (though the pickups of the Arona 5 are made by Delano). Another bass I ran across is the ESP LTD D-5, but as with the Schecter, I don't know what their basses are like.
#5
I picked up an '89 Carvin LB75 for under $500. Perfect condition, active preamp. I'm not sure about "innocent" looking -- it's Ferrari red with a Jacksonesque tilted pointy headstock. Might just look carefully at the used market...
#6
Quote by dspellman
I picked up an '89 Carvin LB75 for under $500. Perfect condition, active preamp. I'm not sure about "innocent" looking -- it's Ferrari red with a Jacksonesque tilted pointy headstock. Might just look carefully at the used market...


For me, there's nothing wrong with buying used, but the issue is that I can't get my hands on the instrument I'm buying. I don't want to buy an instrument blindly without having tested this particular unit I'm buying.
#7
I've played multiple 5 strings and currently own an MTD Artist 5, Schecter Stilleto Elite 5 and an Ibanez SR505. It's just my personal opinion, but the SR505 blows away anything I've owned or tried out so far. In fairness though, I haven't played anything high end ($1,000+).

If you could find a new SR505 you could get a good deal on them. Brand new they're $650.

http://www.zzounds.com/item--IBASR505
#8
Quote by ronhoward
I've played multiple 5 strings and currently own an MTD Artist 5, Schecter Stilleto Elite 5 and an Ibanez SR505. It's just my personal opinion, but the SR505 blows away anything I've owned or tried out so far. In fairness though, I haven't played anything high end ($1,000+).

If you could find a new SR505 you could get a good deal on them. Brand new they're $650.

http://www.zzounds.com/item--IBASR505


This sounds very convincing. Definitely got to get my hands on one.
#9
Try out some Schecters as well. The ones I have play great, I'm just not crazy about the EMGHZ pups personally. Some people like them, they're just not for me.
#10
Quote by ronhoward
Try out some Schecters as well. The ones I have play great, I'm just not crazy about the EMGHZ pups personally. Some people like them, they're just not for me.


Which one(s) do you have?
#12
Quote by Spanner93
Ibanez SR *anything ending in a 5* e.g. SR 505

Peavey Millennium AC BXP 5


The Peavey still got regular use when I bought my Warwick. Absolute workhorse of a bass, that thing, and an utter bargain.
#13
My recommendation, as always, is to get a Squier and swap out the electronics and bridge.

Ibanez are also a fantastic option but their drying and dimensions are odd. Definitely try in a shop.
#14
Also had a Peavey BXP once, not a bad bass. As far as cheap basses go, I had a Rogue that sounded better than some basses that cost a couple hundred dollars more.
#15
I need a 5 string bass. I'm in a band for 5 years now and most of the time my '62 reissue Preci serves me great, but we decided to go harder so I need one more string for about two songs now. Now, I'm playing them one octave higher, which sounds terrible. When playing live I don't have the time to tune down between the songs, so I definitely need either another 4 string or, more preferable, a 5 string.



I just wanted to address the issue of "sound."
I added bass to the arsenal about a year and a half ago, just about the same time that I was picking up a new keyboard rig (Korg KronosX). I've been playing guitars for quite a while now, but started out on keys.

In moving to bass, I assumed that I'd be playing with a 410 or similar (most of my bass players had done so). But most 410s don't handle 5-strings all that well and none have the range or flat response to handle keys. Keys can actually go LOWER than a five-string, believe it or not.

I eventually discovered fEARful bass cabinets (specifically the 15/6/1 and the fEARless F115) and 1500W power amps (as well as old Bass Pod XTs and Carvin BX1500 bass amps). Not only are they *lighter* than manufactured 410 bass cabinets, but they also go lower without farting out and they handle up to 900W per cabinet. At the moment, I'm able to run extremely loud (and low) bass through a pair of these cabinets with a 1500W power amp that cost me $299 new and that weighs 9 lbs (visit the Carvin HD1500). The cabinets themselves are in the 50 lb range. In addition, these cabinets and that same power amp will also handle full-range keyboards and synths, as well as guitar being played through Axe-FX and Pod-style modelers. In fact, with a little Alto 8-channel mixer, I can have all three hooked up at once.

In essence, these cabinets are very like a PA system that will go down to 35Hz and up to about 18Khz with fairly flat response. In fact, if I get all my settings done correctly for this system, the individual components will sound good if I need to run DI to the PA mixer. I've had sound guys flip a coin as to whether they want the bass in the PA or just coming out of this system; I think they just turn me up in the FOH system if they need more coverage or need correct sound in the outer reaches where the delay boxes live in the back of an arena.

But since we're talking bass -- I've found that most 4x10s have a low mids bump designed in to make them sound louder but that they don't do very well in the low end of things at all. That doesn't bode well for a 5-string if you're actually using anything near the open B. You also need to remember that if you want to get the *same volume* an octave down, you need at least FOUR TIMES the air movement. So simply getting a five-string isn't going to solve your "heavy" or "hard" issue if you can't punch it out. You're going to have to look at your rig. In my case, moving to the fEARful cabinets and to a serious power amp solved the same issues you're going to be facing.
#17
Quote by dspellman
I just wanted to address the issue of "sound."
I added bass to the arsenal about a year and a half ago, just about the same time that I was picking up a new keyboard rig (Korg KronosX). I've been playing guitars for quite a while now, but started out on keys.

In moving to bass, I assumed that I'd be playing with a 410 or similar (most of my bass players had done so). But most 410s don't handle 5-strings all that well and none have the range or flat response to handle keys. Keys can actually go LOWER than a five-string, believe it or not.

I eventually discovered fEARful bass cabinets (specifically the 15/6/1 and the fEARless F115) and 1500W power amps (as well as old Bass Pod XTs and Carvin BX1500 bass amps). Not only are they *lighter* than manufactured 410 bass cabinets, but they also go lower without farting out and they handle up to 900W per cabinet. At the moment, I'm able to run extremely loud (and low) bass through a pair of these cabinets with a 1500W power amp that cost me $299 new and that weighs 9 lbs (visit the Carvin HD1500). The cabinets themselves are in the 50 lb range. In addition, these cabinets and that same power amp will also handle full-range keyboards and synths, as well as guitar being played through Axe-FX and Pod-style modelers. In fact, with a little Alto 8-channel mixer, I can have all three hooked up at once.

In essence, these cabinets are very like a PA system that will go down to 35Hz and up to about 18Khz with fairly flat response. In fact, if I get all my settings done correctly for this system, the individual components will sound good if I need to run DI to the PA mixer. I've had sound guys flip a coin as to whether they want the bass in the PA or just coming out of this system; I think they just turn me up in the FOH system if they need more coverage or need correct sound in the outer reaches where the delay boxes live in the back of an arena.

But since we're talking bass -- I've found that most 4x10s have a low mids bump designed in to make them sound louder but that they don't do very well in the low end of things at all. That doesn't bode well for a 5-string if you're actually using anything near the open B. You also need to remember that if you want to get the *same volume* an octave down, you need at least FOUR TIMES the air movement. So simply getting a five-string isn't going to solve your "heavy" or "hard" issue if you can't punch it out. You're going to have to look at your rig. In my case, moving to the fEARful cabinets and to a serious power amp solved the same issues you're going to be facing.


nonononononono it's sounding terrible because I'm playing it an octave higher, not because of the amp/bass/settings. It just sounds bad when we're playing it all together.
#18
Quote by Deliriumbassist
The Peavey still got regular use when I bought my Warwick. Absolute workhorse of a bass, that thing, and an utter bargain.


too bad I can't find any Peavey basses here in Switzerland, even if I would buy one blindly, most sites I found don't even ship to Switzerland.
#19
Quote by Spaz91
My recommendation, as always, is to get a Squier and swap out the electronics and bridge.

Ibanez are also a fantastic option but their drying and dimensions are odd. Definitely try in a shop.


I've played some Squiers and I don't really like them (feel in the hand, choice of wood, action and so on), also, with all those modifications, I'll pay quite a bit more as if I would go for an Ibanez.
#20
Quote by JulianUndso
nonononononono it's sounding terrible because I'm playing it an octave higher, not because of the amp/bass/settings. It just sounds bad when we're playing it all together.


Okay, so you missed the whole point of that diatribe.

I should have been clearer.

I started with a 4-string P&J passive-pickup bass and later added an active pickup 5-string bass. Different people play fives for different reasons. Some use that B string as a thumb rest and play it as a four-string. Some use the extra string as a way to do wider-range bass patterns without moving out of a position.

But you're actually going to USE those extra notes from E down to B. And what you're going to find is that most manufacturers' bass amps don't play well with a five-string in that range. They don't have the extra power required and they don't have the extra range.

When you actually get your five-string and crank your existing rig up to the volume you need to play live with your band, you may find you want to revisit that post.
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 14, 2014,
#21
Quote by dspellman
Okay, so you missed the whole point of that diatribe.

I should have been clearer.

I started with a 4-string P&J passive-pickup bass and later added an active pickup 5-string bass. Different people play fives for different reasons. Some use that B string as a thumb rest and play it as a four-string. Some use the extra string as a way to do wider-range bass patterns without moving out of a position.

But you're actually going to USE those extra notes from E down to B. And what you're going to find is that most manufacturers' bass amps don't play well with a five-string in that range. They don't have the extra power required and they don't have the extra range.

When you actually get your five-string and crank your existing rig up to the volume you need to play live with your band, you may find you want to revisit that post.


aaah I see