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#1
Hello everyone,

After pondering a lot (including lots of help from this forum), I have finally bought an USA Olympic White Fender Stratocaster Standard! It's beautiful... can't stop looking at it!

Anyway... I just have a few questions to the "experts" among you regarding the Strat Am standard.

There are a few "problems" with the guitar (that I didn't get at the store):

1- The jack is really lose. Even if this is not a big problem, it is kind of strange to see something like this from such an expensive guitar.

2- There is quite a bit of fret buzz when strumming the strings hard. The buzz doesn't come through the amp... only if I plug in into my digital amp and listen to it through headphones I can hear a bit of buzz coming through. Is this normal? Acceptable? Is it just me trying to "find the buzz" and playing harder than what I normally would?

3- Even if the intonation at the 12th fret is quite OK, I have a slight problem with the intonation at the 1st fret, low E. My F is almost half tone sharp (well, not really half a tone... but half of a half a tone!!! ) ... Up the E, many notes are sharper (albeit not as sharp) than what they should (and I can't fix it by tightening the saddles). The rest is quite well intonated. What should I do?

4- The 2nd tone knob (the one from bridge/mid pickups) is not straight (its slightly bent, if you are looking at the knob from the side). Is this likely to be the knob or the metal thing the knob goes into? (didn't pulled it out yet... Too new guitar!!!)

Anyway... All in all, it is quite a fine guitar! But I was expecting, for the price I have paid, that these problems wouldn't be there. Ideas/suggestions are very welcome!

Best wishes
#2
When you say that the jack is loose, do you mean the jack itself that the plug goes into, or the chrome piece that holds the jack and is screwed into the body? If it's the chrome piece, you can just tighten the screws until slightly snug. If it's the jack itself, you could remove it and bend the prongs until it's tight. Or you you can put in a new jack. It's not hard if you can solder. If you can't, then take it back to the dealer.

The fret buzz and intonation are setup issues. See if your dealer includes setup in the price of the guitar.

The tone knob is a warranty issue, if it's under warranty. If not, a new pot isn't expensive, but again you have to be able to solder.
#3
All of those are issues that should have been dealt with by the dealer, before selling you the guitar. Take it back and tell them to fix or replace it. Make them actually earn their money. Did you get it from Guitar Center? Or some online retailer? That'd be my guess. Since GC and online retailers don't give a shit about their own part in the quality control process.
#4
^ + ^^ yeah i'd be wary of doing too much (i.e. anything) if it's still under warranty. the last thing you want to do is void the warranty in the process of figuring out it's a problem which is more complex than you thought and which you can't fix.

companies normally don't want you to try to fix it yourself (or if you do, they sometimes use that as an excuse to void the warranty). As such, that's their fault, not yours, and you kind of have to play the game so it suits you- i.e. bring/send it back.

if you could post some pics that might help, as well.
#5
This may be an unpopular opinion here, but Fender ****ing sucks. I have an AM Standard strat also, after wanting one my entire life, and it has been extremely disappointing in almost every way.
#6
Quote by Monkeyleg
When you say that the jack is loose, do you mean the jack itself that the plug goes into, or the chrome piece that holds the jack and is screwed into the body? If it's the chrome piece, you can just tighten the screws until slightly snug. If it's the jack itself, you could remove it and bend the prongs until it's tight. Or you you can put in a new jack. It's not hard if you can solder. If you can't, then take it back to the dealer.

The fret buzz and intonation are setup issues. See if your dealer includes setup in the price of the guitar.

The tone knob is a warranty issue, if it's under warranty. If not, a new pot isn't expensive, but again you have to be able to solder.

What is lose is just the jack (not the plate). It moves when I plug or unplug a cable. If I also push the jack, I can see it moving. I just cant screw it myself... I tried to unscrew the plate and screw it from the inside, but I decided I didn't want to touch it anymore.

For the buzz... Maybe I am blowing things a bit! My guitar teacher went with me and he said that what I called buzz, was no buzz. But truth be said, when I sat playing the guitar with my headphones on, I can effectively hear a buzz. If I pick softly... I don't! So maybe it is just in my head...
The intonation of the Low E is a problem and I can't fix it. I pulled the saddle all the way to the bridge, but even if intonated okish at the 12th fret, the first frets are almost half a tone off! I guess I just have to take it to the seller...

Regarding the knob... Just pulled it out and plugged it back in. I also swapped tone knobs and, indeed, the tone knob 2 is slightly bent (it is not exactly bent... its just that the bottom of the knob is not perfectly parallel to the pickguard). But I decided this is not an issue. I am not looking for a flawless guitar. I am looking for a guitar with soul and unique. Given this does nothing to the playability, I am putting this on the uniqueness of my own guitar!
#7
Quote by the_bi99man
All of those are issues that should have been dealt with by the dealer, before selling you the guitar. Take it back and tell them to fix or replace it. Make them actually earn their money. Did you get it from Guitar Center? Or some online retailer? That'd be my guess. Since GC and online retailers don't give a shit about their own part in the quality control process.

I live in Paris, France. The seller did do a setup on it... So I am not sure what to think!
#8
Quote by RyanMW2010
This may be an unpopular opinion here, but Fender ****ing sucks. I have an AM Standard strat also, after wanting one my entire life, and it has been extremely disappointing in almost every way.


I am not disappointed... I love it and I am very happy to own a AM standard strat! I have been dreaming about it! There are some issues that I am trying to sort out (and, of course, I shouldn't be trying to sort them out). But, besides that, I am quite happy with the guitar!
#9
Quote by milcs

The intonation of the Low E is a problem and I can't fix it. I pulled the saddle all the way to the bridge, but even if intonated okish at the 12th fret, the first frets are almost half a tone off! I guess I just have to take it to the seller...


It might be the nut, if the angle of the slot is wrong the string will be in contact with the nut mostly toward the peghead, I'd just take it back to the seller
#10
the jack is an easy fix and may be the source of your buzz issue as well. if the solder connection is bad then that can cause some noise. a good setup should fix the other issues you have. keep in mind that a neck can't be 100% intonated so there may be a spot or 2 that is off by a little. the nut could be the culprit as mentioned and not be slotted correctly (happens often sadly) have the tech make sure that the frets are all level as well as that will cause the intonation to be off.
#11
Just went to my guitar teacher's house and we were listening to it. Bottom line... He says "It is not shocking!".

It is not an electric buzz (so the jack is not the culprit). It is more of a metallic resonance a bit all over. I can't pinpoint if it is down in the bridge or somewhere on the frets (or both, which is the most likely). If I play it gently (without strumming hard, there is no buzz at all). Mind you, the action is set quite low (they come set quite low from the factory) and it is .9-.42 (or .46?). So, I will be changing these soon to something a bit more respectable!

Also, I have tested so many different Am standard strats, that I am now quite positive this is just the way it is. Only time will tell if I will get used to it...

The funny thing is, my teacher was playing his US G&L Legacy and there is no metallic buzz anywhere! I guess I know what my next guitar is going to be!!!

If I have the time, I will try to post some videos with what I call "fret buzz". To have an opinion from the standard owners of whether or not it is a "feature" of the fender strat!

Now... Off to profit of my new baby and try not to get engulfed by an obsessive compulsive behavior!
#12
To be honest, not one of these problems sounds like a real problem.

The nut on the input-jack comes loose on every guitar, ever. It is very common for it to shake loose during shipping. Just remove the plate and tighten the nut.

The setup is also affected during shipping, so just look it over at arrival.

The only way to find out if the shaft is bent is to remove the tone-knob and find out. If it is, then that is a problem that should be fixed by the store.
#13
Honestly, I'd just take it back and get the free set up you're suppose to get.

Is that metallic resonance perhaps the springs in the tremolo clunking into one another?

Quote by RyanMW2010
This may be an unpopular opinion here, but Fender ****ing sucks. I have an AM Standard strat also, after wanting one my entire life, and it has been extremely disappointing in almost every way.



I had an Ibanez guitar once and I didn't like it! All Ibanez sucks!
#14
I often had the problem with the nut on the jack loosening. I finally loosened the nut, put a drop of Loctite blue (not red!) on the threads and tightened the nut. That takes care of it.

Pushing and pulling the plug into the jack can torque the jack left or right, which will loosen it. Fender should really use good lockwashers to prevent that.
#15
I'd definitely take it back and get it set up. I'd get the bent knob replaced as well. You'll do enough to "make it unique," but they don't leave the factor that way.
#16
Quote by RyanMW2010
This may be an unpopular opinion here, but Fender ****ing sucks. I have an AM Standard strat also, after wanting one my entire life, and it has been extremely disappointing in almost every way.


I had over 10 Fenders and only once have a had an issue, which was a slight blemish in the nitro.

Your single, vague disappointment does not speak for the entire history of the company.
#17
Well... the store owner did a quick setup and, most importantly, my guitar teacher tried to make the metallic resonance diminish. He worked a bit the neck, touched slightly the saddles and not much more. But, as I said, he said that was OK for him, specially given the action is low.

As it stands now, I can play without making it buzz (if I am playing individual notes). If I play chords/rhythms... that's a bit more difficult to not hear the buzz.

Besides that, the other problems are solved (my teacher tightened the jack and I don't think that the very slightly bent knob is a problem).

So, long story short... I am just wondering if owners of the american standard start could chime in and let me know about their experience. Does it, indeed, buzz a bit? Is this a characteristic of the beast?


PS: Please, don't turn this into a "Love vs Hate" debate! I love my guitar... I desired it, I bought it and I am going to enjoy it as much as I can! Whether it is brand A, B or C... it matters so very little!
#18
While we are at it...

Does anyone knows of a nice guide (or know up and close) on understanding tone/pickup positions on the am strat standard? I am interested in knowing a bit more about the sounds of the pickups in the different positions and how one can work with the tone knobs to affect the sounds we can extract from this beautiful guitar!!!!
#19
I own an American Standard Strat.

What do you mean by buzz? I have heard complaints about buzz so many times, and then there actually is no problem with the guitar. It is just the way guitars behave. If you want no buzz at all, you would have to have sky high action, an no-one plays that way. It is the amplified tone that matters. If that is affected, then it is a problem. An electric guitar is an instrument made to be played at volumes where you don't hear the strings. People playing in bedrooms at tiny volume levels hear strings rattle and think there's a problem because that's not what they hear when they listen to a recording. Of course not!

How hard do you play? The harder you play, the higher action you need for the strings to ring out correctly. Listen to somebody else playing your guitar - do you hear the same buzz? Do other experienced players think there's a buzz problem on your guitar? All this matters.

How much experience do you have?
#20
Quote by HomerSGR
I own an American Standard Strat.

What do you mean by buzz? I have heard complaints about buzz so many times, and then there actually is no problem with the guitar. It is just the way guitars behave. If you want no buzz at all, you would have to have sky high action, an no-one plays that way. It is the amplified tone that matters. If that is affected, then it is a problem. An electric guitar is an instrument made to be played at volumes where you don't hear the strings. People playing in bedrooms at tiny volume levels hear strings rattle and think there's a problem because that's not what they hear when they listen to a recording. Of course not!

How hard do you play? The harder you play, the higher action you need for the strings to ring out correctly. Listen to somebody else playing your guitar - do you hear the same buzz? Do other experienced players think there's a buzz problem on your guitar? All this matters.

How much experience do you have?

Hey Homer! Thank you for your insight!
I am a quite new electric guitar player (started playing in march). So yeah, if you read my previous posts, you will see that I am not entirely complaining about the buzz! I am wondering if it is normal...

My guitar teacher played it and he says it is fine. But in saying this, while he was playing my guitar and his G&L Legacy, the difference was obvious. So, as he put it "It doesn't shock me", but clearly not the same performance as his guitar...

For the buzz itself, if I am listening to the guitar through the headphones on my Mustang... Yes, I can hear the buzz. If not using the headphones... Not really.
And of course, I only hear the "buzz" when I pluck too hard (or strum for rhythms).

I will try to make a video at some point, just to have the opinion of people that are more experienced!
#21
And by the way... What string gauge do you guys recommend for it?
#23
Ok, just shot a quick video of me playing the guitar unplugged...
I know this is not the way to listen to the guitar, but I really just want to clear my mind about this "issue" (which I hope is no issue).
Here is the video: http://youtu.be/kzgmZL4Slrw

If you have the patience to look at a guy strumming down the guitar arm on all strings, you will see that there is a noticeable buzz, particularly at the D and G strings.
What do you guys think?
#24
If you play that hard, every guitar with low action is going to buzz like crazy. I'm surprised it does not buzz more. You have nothing to worry about.
#25
I don't see a problem! Fret buzz is only a problem when you can hear it from the amp when playng. If you have a low action then your going to have to play a bit lighter but from the video I don't hear anything wrong.
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Nov 9, 2014,
#26
Hello and thank you so much for your input!
Well... I guess I have to learn how to play my new electrical guitar! I still find it buzzes a bit too much for my taste (as I said, specially playing chords and when I strum a bit harder), but I see the point you guys make and I completely agree that my degree of electric guitar illiteracy makes me see issues that do not exist!
#27
I bet the better player you become the less of that Buzz you will hear.
#28
Hello again!!!

Sorry to come back to this, but I have to say that there are a few strings that still bug me a bit! Specially the G...

Yesterday I was playing some Rocksmith 2014 and, while playing The Strokes, I have caught attention of the buzz on the G string. As I was listening to it through the headphones on my Amp, this was quite evident, particularly as I was strumming the rhythm part.

After playing a bit with my Mustang amp, I realized that in very clean amp presets, the buzz does come through. So yeah, this is annoying me quite a bit! I know, I should be enjoying my guitar rather than freaking about this... but I just think it shouldn't be like this.

I am putting a video of me just going up and down a scale (and focusing a bit on the G).

http://youtu.be/uCkNS8B7stQ

What do you guys think?
#29
The G does sound different on a Strat because the scale length originally allowed for a wound G, I used to hear it and now I know it's normal. I don't hear anything on your video, the thing isn't even plugged in. What difference does it matter how it sounds unplugged? You're obsessing over details in a way that are irrelevant, plugged in and amplified is the only thing that matters.

Just play the thing or take it to a tech, we really can't help you over the Internet. Take it to a professional if you're worried.
Last edited by Mephaphil at Nov 10, 2014,
#30
Quote by milcs
There are a few "problems" with the guitar (that I didn't get at the store):

1- The jack is really lose. Even if this is not a big problem, it is kind of strange to see something like this from such an expensive guitar.
Jack retainer nuts often come loose, regardless of its race, creed, or national origin. If the jack itself is defective, I'd replace it myself. That is if it weren't a brand new $1500.00 (?) guitar

Quote by milcs
2- There is quite a bit of fret buzz when strumming the strings hard. The buzz doesn't come through the amp... only if I plug in into my digital amp and listen to it through headphones I can hear a bit of buzz coming through. Is this normal? Acceptable? Is it just me trying to "find the buzz" and playing harder than what I normally would?
First off, what gauge are the strings. I normally play electric "regular), (.010 to .047), if your guitar is strung wit anything lighter than that, it could account for some of the buzz. Especially if you o have a mildly heavy touch.

Another possible issue that could cause buzzing, is no "neck relief" That just means the neck is, "too straight". This requires adjusting the truss rod. Don't try this at home kids. As a beginner, the guitar needs to go to the shop for this. Your dealer will be able to give you the thumbs 's up or thumb's down on the relief issue very quickly. The adjustment only takes about a minute, but should be done by a tech, at least until you know your way around guitar setup, and have the tools,.

Quote by milcs
3- Even if the intonation at the 12th fret is quite OK, I have a slight problem with the intonation at the 1st fret, low E. My F is almost half tone sharp (well, not really half a tone... but half of a half a tone!!! ) ... Up the E, many notes are sharper (albeit not as sharp) than what they should (and I can't fix it by tightening the saddles). The rest is quite well intonated. What should I do?
No matter how low the action is on a guitar, the strings will always pull a touch sharp when they're fretted. If you want enough intonation problems to keep you up into the wee hours of the morning, buy an acoustic 12 string. Meanwhile, what you call a "half of a half of a semitone", I would call "25 cents". !00 cents make a semi tone, but it's divided into two 50 cent parts, running from 0 to 50 from the bottom note up, and the top note down.. if your talking about the lower note, then it would be, "XX" cents SHARP. If the intonation error is more than 50 cent up, then you would be calling it "xx" cents flat.

Quote by milcs
4- The 2nd tone knob (the one from bridge/mid pickups) is not straight (its slightly bent, if you are looking at the knob from the side). Is this likely to be the knob or the metal thing the knob goes into? (didn't pulled it out yet... Too new guitar!!!)
The shafts of many control pots, (actually, "potentiometer"), are a bit sloppy as they come through the housing bushing. If you have another knob, preferably a flat topped, "speed knob", put it on, and see if the knob just rocks side to side, (loose bushing in the pot), or the flat top of the knob changes angle as you turn it, or if you prefer "wobbles". (bent pot shaft).

Quote by milcs
Anyway... All in all, it is quite a fine guitar! But I was expecting, for the price I have paid, that these problems wouldn't be there. Ideas/suggestions are very welcome!...[ ]...
I suppose Fender USA, is as good as anybody with respect to competent staff and QA. However, many people complain about inconsistency between the same model guitars. These complaints are not directed at specific maker, but get spread around from Gibson to Martin, to Fender.

The truth of the matter is, factories all over Asia, are turning out really good work these days. Of course, if you bought a guitar made in China, you would either expect some little issues, or just forgive them. The truth, as harsh as it might be to hear, is that American workers don't always live up to their own hype, and that's stone cold, but regrettable, fact.
#31
I checked the videos. I didn't hear any buzz on the other strings (you may only be hearing the sound of new strings - I mean, new strings do have that kind of "metallic" sound to them - or maybe the tremolo springs are causing the buzz). The G string does buzz a bit though. But if you can't hear it through the amp's speaker, it doesn't matter.

If it bothers you, take it back to the store. My Charvel had fret buzz and I took it to the store and they did truss rod adjustment for me. It also had a loose volume knob which caused a wire inside the guitar to snap. So they resoldered it. If you have problems with the guitar, just take it to the store. They should fix all the things that bother you. Products have a warranty for a reason. I would take advantage of it now because now it's free. But after a year or two fixing stuff that bothers you isn't free any more. Your instrument should work perfectly when you buy it. I would expect a €1000 instrument to work pretty well. And if it didn't work the way I wanted, I would take it back to the store and tell them to make it work.
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 10, 2014,
#32
Thank you all for your replies.

I will try to make a video plugged in (didn't do it before because I live in a small apartment and have two small kids). In any case, as I mentioned, the buzz can be heard through the amp. That is the only reason why this issue is bothering me a bit...

At the moment, I have everything stock. This means that the strings are .9-.42 (I think...). I will change them soon to .10-.46. Hopefully this will help with the buzz I hear!

I guess I will try to go to the store. I was just reaching out to you guys, as I don't want to get there and have that kind of look "What is this noob going on about?"!
#33
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I checked the videos. I didn't hear any buzz on the other strings (you may only be hearing the sound of new strings - I mean, new strings do have that kind of "metallic" sound to them - or maybe the tremolo springs are causing the buzz). The G string does buzz a bit though. But if you can't hear it through the amp's speaker, it doesn't matter.

Yes... After playing the guitar, I am quite satisfied with the setup and the way it sounds... Apart from that G string. Besides that, everything else is playing well and pleasantly! I am wondering whether I should try to raise a little bit the saddle of that string...
#34
The G will sound different from the other strings. It's meant to have a wound G, but people started using an unwound one. Does it sound, buzzy and like it oscillates?
#35
Just tested it with the amp cranked up, in the cleanest setting I could get and I couldn't, for the sake of me, make a recording where I could detect any buzz! I definitely hear it when I connect headphones to the amp... But not when I play through the amp speaker. Even in the cleanest setting possible (meaning with a bit of effects, it will never be heard)!

So I guess I will have to forget about it... Or try! honestly, my Yamaha Pacific 112v has much less fret buzz than my beautiful new strat! But well... Time to profit from my new baby!

Quick question... The pickups sound quite harsh (find myself turning the tone knobs to reduce the treble). Is this a characteristic of this pickups or the new strings?

Cheers
#36
I haven't played those pickups. If you don't like the amount of treble turn down the treble on the amp. If it's still got too much high frequency get some new pickups.
#37
Quote by milcs
Just tested it with the amp cranked up, in the cleanest setting I could get and I couldn't, for the sake of me, make a recording where I could detect any buzz! I definitely hear it when I connect headphones to the amp... But not when I play through the amp speaker. Even in the cleanest setting possible (meaning with a bit of effects, it will never be heard)!
Earlier you mentioned "digital amp". If this is a modeling amp, sometime they have what is categorized as "digital fizzle", which can also be interpreted as "buzz". So if the issue is in the phones, which have a lot more treble than your guitar amp's speaker, at least part of what you're hearing could be the amp.

Quote by milcs
Quick question... The pickups sound quite harsh (find myself turning the tone knobs to reduce the treble). Is this a characteristic of this pickups or the new strings?
Most likely both. Harsh sound, "twang" if you like, is Fender's thing. New strings take a couple of hours to break in, to lose their harsh metallic twang.
#38
Quote by Captaincranky
Earlier you mentioned "digital amp". If this is a modeling amp, sometime they have what is categorized as "digital fizzle", which can also be interpreted as "buzz". So if the issue is in the phones, which have a lot more treble than your guitar amp's speaker, at least part of what you're hearing could be the amp.

Well... I do not believe that to be the case. I can clearly hear the acoustic buzz I have on my G amplified on the headphones. I am quite positive of this...

Quote by Captaincranky
Most likely both. Harsh sound, "twang" if you like, is Fender's thing. New strings take a couple of hours to break in, to lose their harsh metallic twang.


OK! I do not dislike it and find it cool for certain styles... It's just that I was strumming a bit some chords and there, it gets a bit too "penetrant"! I will get used to it and love it very soon, I am sure!
#39
Quote by milcs
Well... I do not believe that to be the case. I can clearly hear the acoustic buzz I have on my G amplified on the headphones. I am quite positive of this...

OK well, IIRC, Fender electric bridges have individually HEIGHT adjustable saddles, as well as the more typical slide adjustment used for intonation. So, after you have the neck relief checked and / or adjusted by a pro, get out your little hex key, and raise the G string saddle a bit. That should take care of it.

Quote by milcs
OK! I do not dislike it and find it cool for certain styles... It's just that I was strumming a bit some chords and there, it gets a bit too "penetrant"! I will get used to it and love it very soon, I am sure!
What you call "penetrant", I call "brittle".

The average player, is going to go to hell and back trying to get a truly pleasing solo sound from a raw Strat. And before somebody chimes in to dispute this, yes, there are expert players who can pull off the solo Tele/Stato-caster, but they are few and far between. And in many cases it's other guitar players that are giving most of the admiration for these select few.

The famous players who employ Starts, David Gilmore, Mark Knopfler, and Eric Clapton to name just 3, are all employing massive amounts of signal processing, and in many cases, are being backed by acoustic guitars. Surely you hear the 12 strings in "Comfortably Numb, & "Wish You Were Here"?

So, if you want to sound your very best banging away on some "cowboy chords", then you need an acoustic/electric. You can then plug that in, add some reverb, delay, chorus,even a phase shifter, and sound cool as hell all by yourself.

You have to get rid of the notion that, "I'll get used to it", and render, "that which is best performed on a Stratocaster to the Stratocaster, and unto another instrument that which is best performed by that instrument.

Here in 2014, many metal bands are working acoustics back into their acts. Why? Because of the harmonic richness of the acoustic, as opposed to the "dry sound" of an electric turned down,which in most cases, just plain sounds better. Especially when you're sitting next to your amp, chasing your tail, trying to find "just the right setting".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 10, 2014,
#40
Quote by Captaincranky
OK well, IIRC, Fender electric bridges have individually HEIGHT adjustable saddles, as well as the more typical slide adjustment used for intonation. So, after you have the neck relief checked and / or adjusted by a pro, get out your little hex key, and raise the G string saddle a bit. That should take care of it.

I am happy with the action of the strings at the moment, to be honest. It's the first time I play in a guitar with such low action (my Pacifica was setup sky-high) and I would like to keep it this way. I am waiting to receive my .10-.46 strings and hoping that will solve this a bit!

Quote by Captaincranky
What you call "penetrant", I call "brittle".

The average player, is going to go to hell and back trying to get a truly pleasing solo sound from a raw Strat. And before somebody chimes in to dispute this, yes, there are expert players who can pull off the solo Tele/Stato-caster, but they are few and far between. And in many cases it's other guitar players that are giving most of the admiration for these select few.

The famous players who employ Starts, David Gilmore, Mark Knopfler, and Eric Clapton to name just 3, are all employing massive amounts of signal processing, and in many cases, are being backed by acoustic guitars. Surely you hear the 12 strings in "Comfortably Numb, & "Wish You Were Here"?

So, if you want to sound your very best banging away on some "cowboy chords", then you need an acoustic/electric. You can then plug that in, add some reverb, delay, chorus,even a phase shifter, and sound cool as hell all by yourself.

You have to get rid of the notion that, "I'll get used to it", and render, "that which is best performed on a Stratocaster to the Stratocaster, and unto another instrument that which is best performed by that instrument.

Here in 2014, many metal bands are working acoustics back into their acts. Why? Because of the harmonic richness of the acoustic, as opposed to the "dry sound" of an electric turned down,which in most cases, just plain sounds better. Especially when you're sitting next to your amp, chasing your tail, trying to find "just the right setting".


So... I have been playing guitar for a while now! I own a few acoustic and one electro-acoustic guitars and I was getting tired of the "cowboy chords". This is why I decided to start playing with the electric guitar. I don't really use it to play chords (although I see no problem doing rhythms with your electric guitar). I use it because I believe the electric guitar offers a pallet of amazing techniques to master, that I find really exciting and challenging.

But... Lesson noted Mr. Cranky!
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