#1
Hey everyone, my guitar has a tonepros locking tune-o-matic bridge, but when I take the strings off, its not locked in place and can fall off.

How do I lock it in place?
#2
There's a screw on the side of it that goes in against the post.

Never bothered with it. Been used to tune-o-matics since my first guitar.
#3
The little black dot on the pickup side? I didn't realise that was a screw, thanks.

EDIT:just checked, looks like a tiny little allen key. Don't think I have one that small, will have to leave it as it is for now.
Last edited by conanwarrior at Nov 8, 2014,
#4
It is the same typ of Allen-key used for bridge saddles on Fender-type bridges. Very small.
#6
Quote by Soccerguy
TOMs aren't supposed to be locked on to the guitar. It should fall off.


That had always been my understanding. As long as you don't move the height screws, it won't hurt anything. And it's nice to be able to take it off and clean under/around it when you change strings.
#7
Quote by Soccerguy
TOMs aren't supposed to be locked on to the guitar. It should fall off.


Guys, TS is totally right. Tonepros make a version that can be locked to the posts of the bridge by turning two little allen-screws.
#8
Quote by HomerSGR
Guys, TS is totally right. Tonepros make a version that can be locked to the posts of the bridge by turning two little allen-screws.


+1. Tonepros bridges and tailpieces are just Gotoh parts with that lock in place.
#9
Quote by Soccerguy
TOMs aren't supposed to be locked on to the guitar. It should fall off.

Then why do some have locking screws?
#10
Quote by Soccerguy
TOMs aren't supposed to be locked on to the guitar. It should fall off.


+1

When changing strings for the first time on my first guitar when I was like ten I freaked out because I thought I broke it, but I've since gotten used to it.
#11
Quote by jaymz9350
Then why do some have locking screws?
So people won't have to start threads because their TOM falls off when they change strings?

That sounds sarcastic, but it's the only reason I can think of that those bridges need to be locked down.

Besides, it's kind of silly to lock the bridge even if it has the screws. Because if it's floating, you can tweak the action height without loosening the locks, and the strings still in place. Just turn the thumb wheels.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 10, 2014,
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
So people won't have to start threads because their TOM falls off when they change strings?

That sounds sarcastic, but it's the only reason I can think of that those bridges need to be locked down.

Besides, it's kind of silly to lock the bridge even if it has the screws. Because if it's floating, you can tweak the action height without loosening the locks, and the strings still in place. Just turn the thumb wheels.


But I wouldn't of started this thread if it wasn't a locking bridge, so its a bit of a paradox there. If it was a normal TOM, I would expect it to come off, but because it was locking, I didn't.
#13
Quote by conanwarrior
But I wouldn't of started this thread if it wasn't a locking bridge, so its a bit of a paradox there. If it was a normal TOM, I would expect it to come off, but because it was locking, I didn't.
I guess they were adding the lock screws as an "added feature", to distinguish it from a Gibson type standard bridge.

Not all "fabulous new features", are worthwhile. They can be simply something which adds to the sales patter....

I suppose they could claim, "a positive lock between the bridge and its mount contributes to sustain", (or some similar 'spin" you'd have to apply with a shovel). In real life, you'd most likely have to have a bank of electronics devices to hear the difference for you...I doubt any of us would be able to hear it.
#14
Quote by Captaincranky

I suppose they could claim, "a positive lock between the bridge and its mount contributes to sustain", (or some similar 'spin" you'd have to apply with a shovel). In real life, you'd most likely have to have a bank of electronics devices to hear the difference for you...I doubt any of us would be able to hear it.

Locking screws wouldn't even make any difference because the amount of tension holding the bridge in place would make the effect of any little grub screws irrelevant.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 10, 2014,
#15
They actually do say it creates perfect intonation and "singing sustain" Haha!
It says it keeps intonation in place when changing strings, but I gathered even with a standard TOM it would still be OK as the strings will place the bridge in the exact same place it was with the previous set?

This is direct from their site "Next time you have the strings off of your guitar, hold your bridge between your thumb and index finger while it still rests on your guitar and wiggle it. If it moves (and it will), you are not getting the intonation and harmonics you deserve".
#16
That's mostly marketing baloney. The last sentence literally made my eyes roll.

It doesn't keep intonation 'in place' when changing strings. Any movement in the bridge when there's no string tension is in the tolerance between the bridge posts and the bridge inserts inside the guitar. Some tolerance needs to be there for the posts to be adjusted freely, but it will move from side to side a tiny amount. it really isn't a big deal whatsoever. just allow the tension of the strings against the bridge press the bridge into it's natural position as you restring it. Then check your intonation after the strings are stretched in. Done. No problem.

The only slight advantage a locking bridge gives over a standard bridge is that the bridge doesn't fall off with no string tension. But I don't see what point there is in having grub screws there when the Locktone bridge that all Epiphones have (for example) simply uses spring-loaded clips that keep the bridge in place perfectly fine, and still allow for the bridge to be adjusted without needing an allen wrench to loosen any grub screws for adjustment.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 10, 2014,
#17
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Locking screws wouldn't even make any difference because the amount of tension holding the bridge in place would make the effect of any little grub screws irrelevant.
I doubt that that truth, would prevent advertisers from at least implying that it could.

Poli-Sci teaches us, if there's still an element of truth in a statement, it's merely, "bullshitting", and not really an "outright lie".

That's quite a self serving, convenient outlook, at least if you're an advertising exec, or politician.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 10, 2014,
#18
Maybe it would improve tone and sustain if there's no string tension to speak of.

The ad suggests the use of strings in the equation, but never mentions at what tension the strings are at, which presses the bridge into the guitar. For all we know, there could be no tension whatsoever. The marketers could use that little technicality to duck out of blatantly lying, even though playing the guitar with completely slack strings is a totally unrealistic scenario in the real world.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 10, 2014,
#19
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
///[ ].... The marketers could use that little technicality to duck out of blatantly lying, even though playing the guitar with completely slack strings is a totally unrealistic scenario in the real world.
I can't remember where advertising had much of anything to do with, "the real world". Can you?
#21
Quote by Captaincranky
Besides, it's kind of silly to lock the bridge even if it has the screws. Because if it's floating, you can tweak the action height without loosening the locks, and the strings still in place. Just turn the thumb wheels.


If you don’t change string gauge there’s rarely a reason to adjust action. My 2009 Schecter with a Tonepros bridge still has the factory setup.
#22
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Maybe it would improve tone and sustain if there's no string tension to speak of.

The ad suggests the use of strings in the equation, but never mentions at what tension the strings are at, which presses the bridge into the guitar. For all we know, there could be no tension whatsoever. The marketers could use that little technicality to duck out of blatantly lying, even though playing the guitar with completely slack strings is a totally unrealistic scenario in the real world.



With some of the ultra low drop tunings, I wouldn't be surprised if slack strings become some new sub genre
#23
Quote by conanwarrior
With some of the ultra low drop tunings, I wouldn't be surprised if slack strings become some new sub genre
They already have! I think it's called, "Djent"....
#24
Quote by Captaincranky
They already have! I think it's called, "Djent"....


That comment made me just search Djent on youtube. I found a mario cover that was pretty good lol!