#1
I'm currently using a chromatic tuner and I am not 100% convinced it's accurate. Any tips for learning to tune by ear?

I don't know where to start?
#2
Chromatic tuners are fairly accurate. Do you have it in standard tuning? As for learning to tune by ear, there really are no tips for that. It just takes a lot of practice. If you're not sure about your tuner, look up how to tune a guitar on youtube and there should be some videos that play the pitch that you need for each string.

Hope that helps!
Last edited by songbird64 at Nov 9, 2014,
#3
Tuners are pretty accurate.

Tips for tuning by ear:
Comes with experience the more you play first off.
When playing or tuning really listen to what's happening. Don't ever confuse thinking with your eyes with thinking with your ears.
Easier way to hear when starting out is by doing harmonics and also being plugged in.
Do harmonics at the 5th fret on the lower string and 7th fret harmonic on the next string up.
When you tune you can hear/feel them fluttering out of phase and get closer and closer as you tune to match each other.
The harmonic or note changes for the G and B string.

(Further on harmonics)
7th fret harmonic on any string is on octave (7th fret D is on octave lower than 19th fret D.
5th fret harmonic on any string is a 5th + an octave on any string. (5th fret A string harmonic is the same as 7th fret D string + an octave up [19th fret])
(This is a lot of thinking reading about it. Just try them and see how the sound the same and different.)

Once you get the feel of doing that with harmonics try fretting the same notes and doing the same thing.
5th fret on low string open on the next one up. The same note.

This is all easier with gain. After you get the hang of it work your way down with the gain, then to unplugged.

You've mastered how to tune your guitar by ear now, great.
Now you think you're the shit and you do it all the time.
Now you're playing with other people.
You're still the shit and you're still doing it.
You're in tune with your own instrument but now you're out of tune with the rest of the band.
What the **** do we do?
Oh yeah electronic tuners, **** yeah!
Last edited by SideEffect at Nov 9, 2014,
#4
I personally hate tuners. You can tune by fretting at 5th or 9th fret except for B string. Or harmonics. I use piano to tune if my piano is nearby. Otherwise I use a tuner to find my low E and that's it.

I'm sure there are videos on YouTube that can show you.
#5
if you want 100% accuracy with a tuner, get a strobe tuner... theyre quite expensive though. around 500-700 bucks. u can get the petersons strobostomp classic.. which, i hear is pretty accurate.... those rectangular plastic tuners like the korg ones are quite bullshit.. but they get the job done... wouldnt call em 100% accurate though, and theyre a bitch if ur on alternate tunings.

as for tuning by ear.. doing it with harmonics is the easiest/most accurate way
Last edited by The SoundGuy at Nov 9, 2014,
#6
Quote by SideEffect

You're in tune with your own instrument but now you're out of tune with the rest of the band.
What the **** do we do?
Oh yeah electronic tuners, **** yeah!



that.
#7
I used to carry an "A" tuning fork in my guitar case and always tune by ear. It's an awfully slow and lame way to do it with all the excellent tuner choices these days but I still can if I choose. Most simple electronic tuners are just Bang-on accurate when I re-check by ear. A non-issue IMO and I just can't imagine spending $500 for a strobe tuner but people do...
#8
Quote by SideEffect
Tuners are pretty accurate.

Tips for tuning by ear:
Comes with experience the more you play first off.
When playing or tuning really listen to what's happening. Don't ever confuse thinking with your eyes with thinking with your ears.
Easier way to hear when starting out is by doing harmonics and also being plugged in.
Do harmonics at the 5th fret on the lower string and 7th fret harmonic on the next string up.
When you tune you can hear/feel them fluttering out of phase and get closer and closer as you tune to match each other.
The harmonic or note changes for the G and B string.

(Further on harmonics)
7th fret harmonic on any string is on octave (7th fret D is on octave lower than 19th fret D.
5th fret harmonic on any string is a 5th + an octave on any string. (5th fret A string harmonic is the same as 7th fret D string + an octave up [19th fret])
(This is a lot of thinking reading about it. Just try them and see how the sound the same and different.)

Once you get the feel of doing that with harmonics try fretting the same notes and doing the same thing.
5th fret on low string open on the next one up. The same note.

This is all easier with gain. After you get the hang of it work your way down with the gain, then to unplugged.

You've mastered how to tune your guitar by ear now, great.
Now you think you're the shit and you do it all the time.
Now you're playing with other people.
You're still the shit and you're still doing it.
You're in tune with your own instrument but now you're out of tune with the rest of the band.
What the **** do we do?
Oh yeah electronic tuners, **** yeah!



Totally agree. Learning to tune by ear is great - detune, and then retune by ear, several times a day, and it will get easy eventually. It looks impressive to people who don't play, and near godly to people who play and can't tune by ear, and it's good practice for you, yourself, to ask, do these notes sound the same? which one is lower or higher? Being able to answer that with confidence is great.

But when you're performing live, or setting up for practice with other musicians, use a tuner for chrissakes.