#1
Most of the songs I like playing are open chords with capos I know I could play these without it most of the time but it's not needed. There's a few songs I play with barre chords like the city by ed sheeran sing by ed sheeran and good feeling by flo rida (learn it purely because it was barre chords) but even that can just be capod.

Is it a bad habit to capo everything that can be and use open chords. I just always think it's just easier and cleaner sometimes. Plus lessons always teach them that way.

I just want some more songs like the city or stuff where you have to use barre chords and move them around so I can have a practice more.
#4
Quote by rohash
Sister Golden hair
I gotta disagree with this one. IMHO, and for other practical reasons, it's better to drop the key on this, and play it open with a 12 string. (When you drop the key, it's easier for us old farts to sing. Plus, you can't avoid barre chords altogether anyway).

Mark Knopfler, more often than not, plays at position, and many of his clever, noodling little rants are based around bits and pieces of a barre chord. Catch,"Sultans of Swing", which is an, "Andalusian Cadence", in this case Dm (5th), C, (3rd), Bb, (1st), and then A major open. The barre chord extravaganza continues throughout Dire Straits album, "Making Movies". He also uses a capo (5th fret) and resonator for, "Portobello Belle". Very simple 4 open chord fun.

Stairway's outro, is Am, G, F down the neck, then back up through G (@3rd) to Am, and do it over, (and over). Here you get to display both styles, as most of the song is open chords and an acoustic 12. (Hence the double neck JP uses to perform it in concert).

Bryan Adams' "Heaven" is similar, as is Heart's, "What About Love". How about Asia, "Heat of the Moment"?

I still think "Pinball Wizard" is the best barre chord practice song around. If nothing else, it will build stamina. Try it with a 12 string....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 10, 2014,
#5
You could play any of your current repertoire using moveable chords instead of open ones.

There is nothing wrong with using a capo, as it allows you to 1) take advantage of the open strings and still find a pitch suitable for the vocalist, and 2) to get the best out of the guitar's tone, or 3) do long stretches. What I don't think is so good is to play everything in one set of chords shapes, say G, and shuffle the capo about change keys, because it limits your arranging options.
#6
Learn to play Badfish by Sublime or any other Sublime song for that matter! No doubt you will be cooler for it!
#7
I'll give some of them a go. I tend to use a capo and use open chords for most songs I just like playing along to songs I don't sing. Its not that I can't play barre chords it's just I see why you would make life harder if it's unessesary. Plus I like the sound of open strings on acoustic and the hammer ons and other stuff left available with open and prefer barre on electric. Most of the song I learnt we're tabbed or taught with a capo. I it worth relearning them all with barres?

Would it be possible to play sultans of swing on acoustic though id love to give that a play. Also any green day songs with barres?
#8
Quote by BassBen93
...[ ]....Would it be possible to play sultans of swing on acoustic though id love to give that a play. ...[ ]....
It's altogether possible to play,"Sultans of Swing" on an acoustic.

I doubt you'd be able to do the lead guitar theatrics, at least not without a looper.

The song has a great Spanish feel in the rhythm, and the rhythm is pretty distinct to the song.

And like they say of,"Guitar George", "He knows all the chords, But he's strictly rhythm, he doesn't want to make it cry or sing"

Here's the chord tab: http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/d/dire_straits/sultans_of_swing_ver3_crd.htm

Mark Knopfler is a deep baritone. There's no need to be able to hit high notes to try singing his songs. That's where some inexperienced singers go wrong 1: Not bringing the highest notes up to full pitch. 2: Not having the upper range to hit the notes expected of a tenor lead singer.

I kinda crap out at E or F above middle C. Not high enough to keep up with lots of the youngsters.

I really think open chords are richer than barre chords, but barre chords have more, "punch", yet lack the drone notes of open strings. Guitar duos are very effective when both player are playing the same chord, but at different position. Also fun is to use 2 guitars capoed on different frets. The harmonies can get pretty thick and rich. Some notes double and even triple, and others go past the range of either of the individual chords.

One of the thing that limits barre chord effectiveness playing acoustic guitar solo, is you start to lose bass as you progress up the neck. The solo acoustic is responsible for playing its own bass part, so there isn't always enough to spare.

Sometimes a capo is used on the original recording, and I work out keys there, by generating moveable versions if the open chords C, D, and G, which aren't normally thought od as moveable.

5 String capos can be fun also, and you can use one to play "Drop E". It's sort of like drop D, by the 5 string capo allows you to use the note on the E string at their normal fret. Drop tuning the E string to D by itself, changes the notes on the E-6 to different frets. Try Eagles, "Peaceful Easy Feeling" using a 5 string capo, @ 2nd fret. Since the Key is E major, you'll be using the chords from D major open. (D, G, A)

While I don't think it's worthwhile to relearn all your songs using barre chords, simply for the sake of doing so. I do think it would be useful to approach the idea by thinking along the lines of, "what would the 2nd guitarist doing here, while guitar 1 is playing the rhythm open"?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 11, 2014,
#9
Quote by BassBen93
I'll give some of them a go. I tend to use a capo and use open chords for most songs I just like playing along to songs I don't sing. Its not that I can't play barre chords it's just I see why you would make life harder if it's unessesary. Plus I like the sound of open strings on acoustic and the hammer ons and other stuff left available with open and prefer barre on electric. Most of the song I learnt we're tabbed or taught with a capo. I it worth relearning them all with barres?

Would it be possible to play sultans of swing on acoustic though id love to give that a play. Also any green day songs with barres?


You do realize that a capo is not a substitute for barre chords. There's many songs that use a capo AND barre chords.
#10
Yeah I play songs like that too or when I'm just making stuff up. I play them when necessary.
#11
My suggestions:
I'll never find another you - The Seekers: folk song, can't remember the original key but even if you capo it you need to do barre chords, interesting progression
Holy grail - Hunters and Collectors: pretty much open E, then barre A, B and C#m
Baba O'Riley - The Who: Three chords but brilliant
Karma Police - Radiohead: there's a few barre chords in slightly unexpected places; awesome chord progression - one of my favourites.
Many many more but that's enough from me for now
Green Day songs with barres? I think they use mostly power chords but you could turn them into major/minor chords. Of the top of my head Boulevard of Broken Dreams and Holiday are in Ab/Fm; Wake me up when September ends is in Em/G but requires a Cm, Bm and F#m (I'm pretty sure).
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
I would swear that at least one part of this uses a capo, either 1st or 3rd fret. Here's a tab: http://www.thewho.net/whotabs/tablature/babaoriley.txt


Yeah true but if you wanted to do open C for whatever reason then you'd probably bar the other chords. Personally I don't usually bother with a capo, I just use barre chords even if I can use an open chords, I find it often makes for a tighter sound and rhythm
#14
By the way Captaincranky, how do you play Pinball Wizard using barres? I play that song but I can't really think of any specific bar chords unless you mean the pre-chorus bit, or the outro, but I usually just use power chords for that. Then again I can't remember if it's played in standard tuning or not...
#15
Quote by mind_meld
By the way Captaincranky, how do you play Pinball Wizard using barres? I play that song but I can't really think of any specific bar chords unless you mean the pre-chorus bit, or the outro, but I usually just use power chords for that. Then again I can't remember if it's played in standard tuning or not...


Actually I just remembered the bar chords in the chorus... Whoops!!! Been a long day
Such a fun song to play though, one of my favourites Never fails to impress either!

(sorry for triple post )
Last edited by mind_meld at Nov 17, 2014,
#16
Quote by mind_meld
Yeah true but if you wanted to do open C for whatever reason then you'd probably bar the other chords. Personally I don't usually bother with a capo, I just use barre chords even if I can use an open chords, I find it often makes for a tighter sound and rhythm
OK, anything newer than, "Tommy", they had a hard time touring with, as they remained faithful to the "power trio" format. With that said, there are several overdubs in, "Baba O'Riley", ostensibly with capos at different frets.

Townshend uses capos in live performance, and the numbers on his guitars sometimes reflect the "tuning", as it were.

As for using a capo to play "Baba", consider this, the open strings amount to the 5 notes of the E minor pentatonic scale. If I play it in E major, B (barre @2), A, (open), E (open). The open strings, (even if struck by accident) will remain ostensibly, "in key".

So, we put a capo on the first fret, play in E, and the open strings now reflect the F minor pentatonic scale. (If you see where I'm going with this)? Basically, it's harder to hit a bad note with the capo in place.

As far as using power chords in an acoustic setting, in most cases, there's often no need, as "gain" isn't an issue. In other words, playing the 3rd, be it major or minor, can't produce the odd order harmonics and inter modulation distortion, that you would get from a "tube Screamer", or similar.

A 6th root major chord, E major open, doesn't present the 3rd, until you hit G-3. (a G#)

A 5th root open chord doesn't present a 3rd until the 2nd (B-2) string. In the case of A major, this would be C#.

OK, so hitting 3 bottom strings of the E, and 4 bottom strings of the A, gives you ready made power chords anyway.

Playing acoustically, it makes sense to use as many strings as possible, since, if you're strumming away on all 6 strings in the rhythm, .then you decide to use a "power chord" for punctuation, your volume diminishes. So, where feasible, just go ahead and blast away on the whole barre chord.

OK, I know this won't work with, "Smoke on the Water", nor am I claiming it will.

But early Who, is acoustic music played through big amps and electric guitars.

Here's the tab to PBW: http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/w/who/pinball_wizard_ver4_crd.htm Notice it's all barre chords. (Also what you're calling the "chorus", is actually the verses, but I know what you meant). He doesn't open up on anything til you hit, "How do you think he does it", (C, G, D, coming from a held D major.)


I guess my overall point here is, "real men do use capos", but not necessarily to diddle around changing keys
#17
My experience is that when dealing with capos and open chord voicings, it's usually a cop out to playing barre chords at the beginner level. Transpose the chord shapes you have (the A shape with a capo on 2 would become a B) on the songs you've learned that fit that description.
#18
No, many professionals, nearly all of them, use capos for some songs to get the pitch they want. Barre chords aren't that difficult for anyone who's been playing more than a few months. Like I said earlier, lots of songs use a capo and barred chords. A capo is just another tool to give your guitar a different sound. Gordon Lightfoot used a capo on the 2nd fret for most of his songs.