Poll: pollis
Poll Options
View poll results: pollis
no
24 35%
yes
7 10%
maybe
7 10%
masturbate
30 44%
Voters: 68.
Page 1 of 3
#1
self explanatory


this can't be worse than a lot of the threads that have been going around recently
Last edited by sonic_hippy at Nov 11, 2014,
#11
In regular conversation? No.
Online? Sometimes I'm not entirely sure if a word means exactly what I think it means, so I look it up. Usually I seem to be on the right track.

Now that I think of it, I think I spend more time looking up Dutch words (Dutch being my mother tongue) than I do looking up English words.
#15
I don't know if I'm just floccinaucinihilipilificating here, but I think big words serve no purpose.
#17
I would like to say at this point I believe this to be a fine thread, and would like to offer TS my most enthusiastic contrafibularities.
#19
Quote by sonic_hippy
so much butthurt


Russell Brand tries to attack capitalism by selling a £20 book in shops and similarly tries to appeal to the working man by using flowery language to confuse and befuddle people so that it distracts them from realising what he is saying is absolute bollocks.
#20
Sure. I know how to use them correctly in context but I wouldn't necessarily be able to give you a nuanced definition of every single word I use.
#21
I make sure I know their meaning nowadays.

When I was a kid I said I was "lustful for my age" thinking lustful meant interested in reading, etc. I learned from that.
#22
Quote by Banjocal
I make sure I know their meaning nowadays.

When I was a kid I said I was "lustful for my age" thinking lustful meant interested in reading, etc. I learned from that.


#23
No, I have a very wide vocabulary, I read thesaurus's as a kid because I wrote song lyrics from like, age 13. I took college english.

But when I hear someone use the wrong wording or term for something it grinds my gears, but I usually keep it to myself. Like what people say they itch themselves, or itch it. Itch isn't a verb, you mean scratch you Neanderthals.
Last edited by stratkat at Nov 11, 2014,
#24
If I'm going to use a word I'm not positive of the meaning of in text, I look it up before I use it specifically because I don't want to look like an idiot by saying something dumb like assuming consequently and conversely are synonyms.

If I'm going to use a word I'm not positive of the meaning of in speech, I'll pause for two seconds and come up with a different synonym/way of phrasing it/etc. so I can avoid that because I don't want to look like an idiot by saying something dumb, but I can't pull up Webster's in a conversation without it being awkward.
#27
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Russell Brand tries to attack capitalism by selling a £20 book in shops and similarly tries to appeal to the working man by using flowery language to confuse and befuddle people so that it distracts them from realising what he is saying is absolute bollocks.

no one is ripping you off except yourself if you buy that book thou
#28
Quote by necrosis1193
If I'm going to use a word I'm not positive of the meaning of in text, I look it up before I use it specifically because I don't want to look like an idiot by saying something dumb like assuming consequently and conversely are synonyms.

If I'm going to use a word I'm not positive of the meaning of in speech, I'll pause for two seconds and come up with a different synonym/way of phrasing it/etc. so I can avoid that because I don't want to look like an idiot by saying something dumb, but I can't pull up Webster's in a conversation without it being awkward.

/thread
#29
I try not to.... I have admittedly a rather large vocabulary. I read constantly, and quite a lot of science and technology material. So I do have quite a lot of "big words" at my command.
I find that if I use them in normal conversation...People look at you funny.

They will accuse you of being "uppity" or trying to "act smart". (How do you "act" smart?)
So anyway, I try to pick my audience. Working at a big university, I may spring some stuff on the faculty folks just to demonstrate that I know what I'm talking about. However, when dealing with a tresspassing kid from the local slum.... Such conversation would be ineffective.

These things continue to get people in trouble. A few years back, a politician used the word "niggardly" in a speech. Immediately, bunches of civil-rights types jumped all over the poor sod for using the "N Word".
Of course "niggardly" means "stingy", and has nothing whatever to do with ethnicity.
#30
Despite liking any attack on capitalism his ideas on voting are utter bollocks. Big damaging bollocks bouncing around like bloated engorged ball bearings dropped on a hard floor.
Last edited by Banjocal at Nov 11, 2014,
#32
i occasionally will confuse the meaning of one. for example, the other day i said "eschew" when i meant "admonish"
#33
Quote by primusfan
i occasionally will confuse the meaning of one. for example, the other day i said "eschew" when i meant "admonish"
why would you confuse nuts with admonish?
#36
Negative. An incondign mastery of multi-syllabic lexemes is, perforce, singularly more injurious than a basic vocabulary of short but apposite words.
#37
i used to but by now i've figured out basically every big word i want to use. i won't use more complex words unless it has a very specific meaning so that i can't avoid it, like "skuemorph" or "surjective" or something. i mostly use the words i tend to read and hear which aren't usually too complicated.

"i am not a smart man" (Gump, 1994)
#38
Nope. I was taught from a young age to never use words if I don't understand what they mean unless I'm asking about them. Besides, if someone's that hard-up to impress someone else, there are better ways to do it than with a vocabulary that most people probably won't understand anyway.
#39
Quote by Jehannum
Negative. An incondign mastery of multi-syllabic lexemes is, perforce, singularly more injurious than a basic vocabulary of short but apposite words.


#40
When writing papers for school, I try to as lexically diverse and esoteric as is conceivably possible.

I get the impression the fancier and more technical my vocabulary is in writing, this somehow picks up the slack if the content of the paper itself is lacking.

It's like a vicious circle jerk where teachers/professionals in a given discipline get off on hearing/reading buzzwords specific to their respective field.
Page 1 of 3