#1
Not sure where to post this seemed appropriate...

my band just bought a 19 foot cargo van for gigging around town and not too far away. I brought the idea of a smaller trailer to free up space in the van and the drummer freaked out and told me he "won't keep his kit in a trailer unless it's climate controlled" which is absolutely ridiculous to me and i argued with him for awhile and pointed out that probably every band that has ever toured has had ALL their shit in a trailer at some point. So what are your experiences with touring and keeping your drums in a trailer? Not going to hurt them at all so long as their in cases?
#2
Tell him, that big bands have the special rack for drum set big enough that the drums are all set up, wired with mics and so on, so the sound of the drums is always like it was suppose to be. If you're going to be big, you'll get endorsement and he wont have to worry for the drums that much.
#3
Tell him to hire surgeons with steady hands as roadies, to carefully carry his precious in and out of gigs.
#4
1) get insurance - we don't need a another sob story of a band losing all their gear without insurance.

2) if it's a very expensive kit then I wouldn't leave it in there either. He should get a cheaper touring kit (shells), which is what my old drummer did. He'd bring his cymbals, high hat and hardware, but play a different set of shells that were cheaper than his 5000$ epic kit.

Wood warps with varying temperatures, so it can damage a drum kit just like it can screw up guitars and basses.
#5
Yeah I would never put my guitar in a trailer. The temperature extremes would kill it in the long run. So whats the difference between "in the trailer" and "in the van"? I'm shrugging.... I guess the trailer just to me seems wayyy more prone to temperature variation.
#6
Great information guys! We're not thinking we're gonna be huge or anything but it was just something we've talked about. And i definately would'nt keep my guitars in a trailer ethier. I'll have to talk to him about cheaper shells then i think thats going to be the best route to take. Unless theres some way you could control the tempurature of your trailer....which sounds like alot of work and the possibility of driving along with a trailer that's engulfed in flames which i am happy to avoid.

Ive never looked into insurance, but as far as security goes myself and the drummer work in a metal fabrication shop and we've fabbed up some perforated metal shields that cover our windows when we need them too. Because i too am paranoid from hearing all the "they stole all our shit" stories and the "we need money so get at us on jumpstart" or whatever

Im not sure what the difference between keeping your shit in a trailer or in the van is. seems like it would be similar except i guess the van would be warmer/cooler while it's on...idkkk
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#7
It's actually pretty rare to need to take your drumset on tour. Usually the headliner will provide drums, and the supports will provide their own snare, cymbals and drum stool. This is so the show runs smoothly.

And when you are starting out touring, it's not a very good idea to headline shows. Nobody knows who you are. Better to get a local band to headline. Even if you are headlining it's still a lot easier to have a local act supply the drumset.

Some drummers get awfully fussy about using their own gear. I recently headlined a gig where one of the support acts insisted on using their own drumset rather than ours. This would have shortened everyone's set times by adding an extra 15-20 mins messing around with drums. Unfortunately we couldn't allow for this so we found a replacement band.
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#8
Being a drummer too I can say that sharing a kit depends on the drummer as nearly every drummer are trying to be one.

How well are your kit afterwards? With drums there can be a million different things to make it just right and any change sucks big time.
Then if something is broken who is paying?