#1
Hello UG!

I've come to you in need of some help. I want to apply to university/college to study music, but I do not know which universities/colleges are good for music and I'm having a hard time finding out some information. I am not a big fan of western classical music, so I am not looking for something that is very traditional and focused on classical western, but something a bit more contemporary. Obviously I know I will learn theory everywhere I go, but I do like theory. I just don't want to have to be forced to play music I am not a fan of for 4 whole years. Additionally, I'm looking into composition, production, or maybe audio engineering, so it would have to be a university which can offer these courses at a good standard. I know that Berklee is the kind of thing I am looking for, but I would also like to know of some other ones, because, obviously, there's the possibility I will not be admitted to Berklee. So, if you could share any of your knowledge with me I would greatly appreciate it!
#2
Mate, you will HATE studying music formally. You will most likely fail your degree and waste all your money and time.

Play music for fun. Figure out something else you want to do.
#4
some universities have music technology programs focused on electroacoustic music, recording and production
#5
Yeah I'd look at studying music tech or recording or finding a contemporary performance program. I have no suggestions.
#6
Quote by AlanHB
Mate, you will HATE studying music formally. You will most likely fail your degree and waste all your money and time.

Play music for fun. Figure out something else you want to do.



^^^ This!

Get your degree in business or literature and keep music for personal joy. A music degree will encompass ALL forms of music... 95% of which you will hate.
#7
No it won't. Music degrees tend to focus on certain styles. Performance degrees broadly split into classical, jazz and contemporary. Within those you'll be pushed to play music that you might not love, but you also have a lot of control over your rep. The individual performance aspect of a degree is a collaborative effort between you and your supervisor(s).

Some people don't like studying music and some people do. Almost no one who is going into music really knows what a music degree will be and so some people are surprised and end up dropping out. I hate the statement, "you'll waste your time and money" because education is never a waste of time or money.
#8
Quote by Cajundaddy
^^^ This!

Get your degree in business or literature and keep music for personal joy. A music degree will encompass ALL forms of music... 95% of which you will hate.

depends where you study.
There are 4 universities in the city I live, only the one I go to has the perfect program for me:
jazz combos with studio recording, arrangement and composition classes, music tech classes, no useless electives we are forced to take, etc. Basically the program with the least BS classes around.
You just have to carefully look at each university's curriculum to avoid wasting your time and money
#9
I'm basing my opinion primarily on this statement:

Obviously I know I will learn theory everywhere I go, but I do like theory. I just don't want to have to be forced to play music I am not a fan of for 4 whole years.


Lets not beat around the bush here. If you don't like it now when you don't have to learn it, you'll hate it when it becomes something you have to learn. I don't think it's a wise choice.
#12
In the US you generally have to take 4-6 classes that are just filler more than anything.
#13
lol!
elective is an optional course right? i meant by that in some music programs you have to take 6 credits or more of optional courses from other faculties that have nothing to do with music (ex. languages, philosophy, ...). having studied in computer science before, i had no need for optional courses, i would rather have more music classes
#14
Personally, I think that part of the whole idea of majoring in music is to be exposed to and play different styles of music - even those you may not particularly like. Really, it can only broaden your horizons and make you a better and more versatile player.

Anyway, USC has a pretty diverse music school. Lots of guitar majors there. Also has a music recording major. I think UCLA is similar, though I'm not sure. Believe BU has a music recording major. Berklee you already stated.

There are a bunch of other ones scattered around the country. Best way to start is just to go to the school's website and see what majors they offer. That's quite literally what I did when I was looking at colleges 15 years ago (and I was looking for Aerospace Engineering and Music Recording - now that's a rather rare combo of majors).

By the way, I ended up majoring in Aerospace Engineering. It's easy to be an engineer and do music on the side; vice versa is a bit tricky.
#15
Quote by igordubai
Hello UG!

I've come to you in need of some help. I want to apply to university/college to study music, but I do not know which universities/colleges are good for music and I'm having a hard time finding out some information. I am not a big fan of western classical music, so I am not looking for something that is very traditional and focused on classical western, but something a bit more contemporary. Obviously I know I will learn theory everywhere I go, but I do like theory. I just don't want to have to be forced to play music I am not a fan of for 4 whole years. Additionally, I'm looking into composition, production, or maybe audio engineering, so it would have to be a university which can offer these courses at a good standard. I know that Berklee is the kind of thing I am looking for, but I would also like to know of some other ones, because, obviously, there's the possibility I will not be admitted to Berklee. So, if you could share any of your knowledge with me I would greatly appreciate it!



If you're looking to engineer don't even waste your time going to college for it. Just look around for a studio offering internships. It's funny because most people go to school for audio engineering just to land an internship at a good studio. By the way There's a lot of people out there with degrees that are jobless. Also It all depends on you, and the effort you're willing to make in order to become a success in whatever field you wish.


EDIT- I forgot to mention the people that end up getting degrees in audio engineering usually end up 10k-30k in debt. It also depends on the school you're going to that determines how much you have to pay. It's even worse because they can't even step their foot into a studio even if they went to school for it, and payed out their pockets. If you do land an internship at a recording studio don't give your input unless asked about certain things. This tends to get a lot of potential engineers kicked out of the studio they're interning at. Just do as your told, and don't over step your boundaries if you so happen to land an internship.
Last edited by Black_devils at Nov 11, 2014,
#16
working at a studio is very political and has a very enforced hierarchy as well. If you aren't prepared to ass kiss for years don't expect to have a paying position in a studio. Atleast that was my experience at Vancouver's most famous studio.
#17
Hey guys, I wasn't able to reply because I went to sleep and had work right after. Thanks for all the extensive replies.I see a lot of people telling me not to study music and to be honest I've had a bit of doubt recently. I will look into UCLA and USC, which seem like good options too from the reputation they have. Thanks everyone for the input.
#18
Quote by SuperKid
lol!
elective is an optional course right? i meant by that in some music programs you have to take 6 credits or more of optional courses from other faculties that have nothing to do with music (ex. languages, philosophy, ...). having studied in computer science before, i had no need for optional courses, i would rather have more music classes


no worries, i knew what you meant, i just couldn't resist

and sometimes they're elective for one course, but mandatory for another etc. So I guess you could technically still call them electives.
#19
Not to be buzzkill, but before you even consider higher ed, you should definitely take some time to critically assess what your end goal is (i.e., professionally). Assuming you're based in the United States, school is EXPENSIVE, both from a financial and time standpoint (I see you mentioned these "don't matter," but with all due respect from an older perspective...they matter!).

For music in particular, if you want pursue this as a professional venture, tread those educational waters carefully! Even going with a "safer" route like music pedagogy/teaching may not pan out from a cost-benefit standpoint. If you want to be a performing artist or do production (e.g., audio engineering, recording, etc.) in my opinion you are better off skipping school altogether and focus your time and energy on actually honing your craft via instrument/vocal lessons, interning at a studio, etc. There's nothing worse than to graduate with a ton of debt and a degree that won't provide any appreciable income (sorry to say it, but humanities aren't fairing well in this economy!).

Personally I recently finished a Masters in (biomedical) engineering and am working in the heathcare industry, starting with a pretty decent salary. This steady income provides discretionary disposable income for all of the fun music toys, and with the technical background I acquired the realms of possibility keep opening up as I'm constantly exploring new things like home recording, sound design, etc.

Anyways, not trying to get onto a soap box or anything (oops too late!), but as I take it you're probably in your late teens or so, it's difficult to see some of these things in the bigger picture (I'm by no means an expert myself being in my mid-20s currently). Good luck at any rate!
#20
Understand that most colleges you go to will have you studying classical and if you are a jazz major you will be studying formal classical jazz.
#21
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Yeah I'd look at studying music tech or recording or finding a contemporary performance program. I have no suggestions.

this