#1
What are the benefits of ear training/learning songs by ear? Is it a useful skill to have for when I decide to compose my own music?
#2
There are different types readily apparent by youtube videos. Some people simply play the right notes, some people do not play the right notes at all, some will improvise, and some people really do a good job and capture as much of the original as possible.

I think the best thing to do with using your ear is capturing as much of the original as possible...from the sound of the guitar to the shape of the bends, nuance pinch-harmonics that may or may not have been intentional, etc.

I think that trying to carbon copy what people play is a good ear exercise as it forces you to really focus in on certain things....You don't have to constantly dwell on nuance, but there are certain little things that you can pickup on and start to use in your own playing that can make things more interesting. And anything that helps you learn more of the neck will allow you to play the notes you hear in your head.

Just learning the notes is fine, but trying to capture the mood is really good for your ear. You won't be able to duplicate everything, and even a lot of guys who play complex solos live never play them the same way twice, but it is still fun IMO.

It's easy to only focus on the macro when it comes to ear training, don't forget the micro.

This is one of my favorite songs to play and there are a bunch of people playing it on youtube, but most of them simply just play the notes....especially that slow bend around 0:20, nobody plays that correctly on the cover versions even though the rest may pitch accurate and in time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVRp_RPxV5w
Last edited by bigblockelectra at Nov 11, 2014,
#3
Quote by bigblockelectra
There are different types readily apparent by youtube videos. Some people simply play the right notes, some people do not play the right notes at all, some will improvise, and some people really do a good job and capture as much of the original as possible.

I think the best thing to do with using your ear is capturing as much of the original as possible...from the sound of the guitar to the shape of the bends, nuance pinch-harmonics that may or may not have been intentional, etc.

I think that trying to carbon copy what people play is a good ear exercise as it forces you to really focus in on certain things....You don't have to constantly dwell on nuance, but there are certain little things that you can pickup on and start to use in your own playing that can make things more interesting. And anything that helps you learn more of the neck will allow you to play the notes you hear in your head.

Just learning the notes is fine, but trying to capture the mood is really good for your ear. You won't be able to duplicate everything, and even a lot of guys who play complex solos live never play them the same way twice, but it is still fun IMO.

It's easy to only focus on the macro when it comes to ear training, don't forget the micro.

This is one of my favorite songs to play and there are a bunch of people playing it on youtube, but most of them simply just play the notes....especially that slow bend around 0:20, nobody plays that correctly on the cover versions even though the rest may pitch accurate and in time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVRp_RPxV5w


Thanks! Very informative! What does learning songs by ear develop skill-wise? Other than being able to play songs that have no tabs.
#4
Quote by JJ1994
Thanks! Very informative! What does learning songs by ear develop skill-wise? Other than being able to play songs that have no tabs.


If you get good at it, you can take away the outside source and transcribe the music you hear in your head. That way you can think of a sound you want to reproduce and then find it on the instrument.
#5
In general it just makes you a better musician, and i would say that you wouldn't be able to compose successfully without your ear.

I made this video for EarMaster (I do a bit of work there besides my studies) where the subject is discussed by professional musicans, students and professors. You can check it out if you want

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2Im2GjDpPE&list=UUWKMycUHNwoHOg0y-Q0kK5Q
Last edited by NiclasEM at Nov 12, 2014,
#6
It helps out tremendously with impromptu playing, especially if the singer forgot to tell you what key he's in.
#7
ear training is probably the most important aspect of being a musician and guitarist as well. you have to be able to hear the different intervals, chords, and so on to be able to really express yourself musically. training your ear goes far beyond transcribing songs. this is one aspect of it, but you have to be able to hear melodies and than play them on guitar and so on. this will really help you become musical and expressive.