#1
Hi, my son has asked Santa Claus for a LES Paul style guitar. Can I ask the views of you all. Is it better to buy a new although budget priced LES Paul for £300, or a better quality 2nd hand guitar for a similar price. - What do you guys think?
#2
Better quality for the same price will always be better.

I'd go used, but make sure that you check out what to look out for, and make sure that you can spot a fake. There are lots of guides.

For £300 used I would go for an Epiphone Les Paul Custom.
#3
Used is almost certainly better. Find a trustworthy guitar expert in your area and ask him if he knows a collector that restores and sells guitars. Chances are he will be one. You can get really great deals from people like this and because they are musos as well they will most likely not rip you off.
#4
Quote by Victorgeiger
Used is almost certainly better. Find a trustworthy guitar expert in your area and ask him if he knows a collector that restores and sells guitars. Chances are he will be one. You can get really great deals from people like this and because they are musos as well they will most likely not rip you off.

Besides the first part what did the rest have to do with the TS question?


But yes a better quality used guitar would be my choice.
#6
Used will most likely find you a better deal for your buck!

BUT: Be sure that the instrument is properly setted up. I've seen "used" that where so poorly maintained and tuned that the user where willing to trade or sell for a lesser value because of the poor state. Strings too high, bridge crooked, pickup at the wrong height, fretboard full un gunt and "sticky". etc...

So, I'd say find a nice deal and keep a couple of dollars to spend on a qualified technician for a proper setup.
#7
I'm a fan of buying used. Generally, that gets you more guitar for the same money.

The drawback is that it sometimes requires a bit more experience to know if you're looking at a bargain or a potential nightmare.

Either way, you should budget for a proper initial setup and a new set of strings. (t1mman beat me to it!) You may even want to make a used sale contingent on an inspection by a good tech. Have him check the frets for level and the neck for warpage, open the control cavity and check the connections, plug in the guitar, check for scratchy (dirty) or bent potentiometers, any pickup issues, etc. Buy the cleanest, most original guitar you can. I avoid guitars that have been heavily modified or personalized; no matter how much the owner plays up the money he's poured into the guitar, you never know what other headaches you might be inheriting.
#8
The biggest risk of buying used (particularly on ebay) is getting a guitar that is totally misrepresented in the listing, and the seller blatantly lying about the guitar not having any faults. Which is easy to get away with since not all faults can be represented by photographs.

I've been in that situation before. Not fun. It makes me reluctant to trust sellers.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 12, 2014,
#9
I would say if your son already plays a little and understands why you bought a used guitar, go for a quality used guitar over a lesser quality new one. He'll appreciate that you went for better quality over shiny and new. If he doesn't play yet, buy a new Epiphone Les Paul Standard (or up). It's very good quality and is shiny and new (which for a young would be guitarist is an important factor also).
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 12, 2014,
#10
I would personally prefer a better quality used guitar than a cheaper brand new one. To me the fact that it is new holds no value in itself over a used model. Take a look at Tokai 'Love Rock' Les Pauls as well as Epiphones, they are great quality for a reasonable price.
Last edited by Grimshanks at Nov 12, 2014,
#11
I almost always recommend used, but be sure you know enough about guitars and their setups to ensure that you're not getting a raw deal. You'll need to know how to check that the neck is straight, that the hardware is in favorable condition, that the wiring inside the body cavity is in good repair, and how to spot integrity cracks in the body or neck. It's not such a big deal if you can find a reputable guitar shop that'll steer you straight, but keep in mind that most of the time, salesmen in music shops make commission, so they're focused on selling you gear. Sadly, often times quality or honest deals come secondary to that ambition.

If you can spot a bad instrument and know what makes a good one, second hand is the best way to go, in my opinion. If not, or if you can't find someone to take with you who is knowledgeable, you're better buying new.
#12
Definitely used! Check out the Japanese copyguitars. Stuff like Tokai and Burny. There is no more bang for your buck that that.
#13
I have no issues buying used guitars.

In fact my 1999 RG470 I bought for like 150.00 plays better then my Gibson 60s tribute I bought in 2011 for like 900.00.
#14
Id say better quality used is thee way to go. I have had one problem pop up in a guitar I bought and have seen it on countless other guitars being sold used. the state of the frets is often bad. Either the previous owner had a steel grip and left indentations on the lower frets or the previous owner was trying to be malmsteen and through all his hard work practicing bending and vibrato, shaved the frets down to an unusable level. its annoying as hell to have to spend more money on a tech to fix this especially if the tech job costs an arm and a leg.

But still, definitely take it to a tech and have the guitar brought back to life if it turns out to have any problems.
#15
Vintage V100. One of the best LP copies for under £300. Period. Full stop. Full period. The end.
#16
One of the "Agile" line, (search "Rondo Music"), might be the way to go also. These always seem to be thought of well here at UG, and get better reviews than the Epiphone Les Phones. (Although, the Epi Pauls are generally well thought of also).

A used guitar might represent a better value, but you have to be able to get next to it and play it. Traveling some distance to look at individual guitars might take up to much of your time, (and petrol money).

Agile's 3xxx series are in your price range, and have a lot of high end features with respect to woods and electronics.

Respectfully though, I don't know if Agile guitars are well distributed in countries that measure money in pounds....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 12, 2014,
#17
shipping an agile guitar to UK would cost around $96 for a AL-3010 (agile lp). that would bring the cost up from $315 to $411USD or 260GBP. Its alot on shipping but its still in your budget, and they are great guitars.
#18
I would say used, no contest, in most cases, but in this instance what is he going to think if Santa brings him a used guitar?
#19
Quote by Tony Done
I would say used, no contest, in most cases, but in this instance what is he going to think if Santa brings him a used guitar?


I think if he's figured out that he wants a Les Paul guitar, then he's figured out the rest.
#20
Quote by bustapr
shipping an agile guitar to UK would cost around $96 for a AL-3010 (agile lp). that would bring the cost up from $315 to $411USD or 260GBP. Its alot on shipping but its still in your budget, and they are great guitars.


Rondo Music has just recently announced that the AL-2000 and AL-3010SE models are going away. We don't know if they'll be replaced with anything in the same price ranges; the next step up is the $400 range AL-3100 range and at around $500, the AL-3200 series.

Both are awesome guitars, but that pretty much leaves the under-$400 range begging for now.
#21
Quote by dspellman
I think if he's figured out that he wants a Les Paul guitar, then he's figured out the rest.


I was thinking about street cred, and the attitudes of early teens. - New and shiny, or older and better. Or maybe he's some kind of prodigy? It is really a small subset of the wider question of what kind of guitar to get a young beginner. - Whatever it takes to keep them interested.