#1
Hey everybody! This is my first post on this sub-forum. There's a bit of a story first, but I'll place my questions at the bottom of this post in case any of you want to skip ahead.

I decided recently to sand the paint off of my Schecter Blackjack. The guitar had been in its case for the past year while my G&L ASAT and Ibanez RG, both which have unfinished necks and a visual aesthetic that I now prefer, have been my main guitars. Removing the Schecter's paint meant that a smooth, unfinished maple neck would be left behind (which feels amazing), as well as a bare mahogany body would can now be finished with a stain, dye, resin, oil... too many possibilities for me to decide on.

Here's the end result after some 35 hours of combined hand and machine sanding. There are some glaring errors (particularly on the front), mostly from accidental overuse of the machine sander, or around the recessed knobs cavities. I'm not fussed about this, but would hope that finishing would even out the appearance a bit.





QUESTIONS: I'd like to retain the natural wood look of the guitar, and avoid glossy or sticky finishes of any sort. I'd also like to make the wood appear a little darker, as it is quite light right now. How would you recommend I finish the guitar?
For reference, I really like the look of this Charvel - how could I achieve a similar result with what I have?



I've never attempted a guitar mod before this, so any insight, opinions or advice would be very much appreciated.

Thank you,
Alex
Last edited by juckfush at Nov 13, 2014,
#2
I would use gunstock oil. My favourite is boiled linseed with about 10% Terebine drier added, but my music store-owning mate uses Birchwood Casey Tru-Oil.
#3
I wouldn't recommend gunstock oil. Especially not on a set neck guitar. It simply doesn't protect the neck from moisture damage well enough.

I know from dspellman that Carvin specifically don't offer warranties on guitars with tung oil or gunstock oil finishes for this reason.
#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I wouldn't recommend gunstock oil. Especially not on a set neck guitar. It simply doesn't protect the neck from moisture damage well enough.

I know from dspellman that Carvin specifically don't offer warranties on guitars with tung oil or gunstock oil finishes for this reason.


Neither do Warmoth, but what about those necks that don't have any finish at all? - IIRC, MM Albert Lee. I would chance it; my old Gibson has no finish at all left on the back of the neck, and it is very stable.

Or you could always oil finish the body and use something else on the neck.
#5
Well the amount a person plays and the person themselves are factors as well (sweat acidity varies from person to person). There's also the extent of the wear too. You might've worn through the colour layer of the lacquer, but the sanding sealer could still be protecting the neck underneath from the moisture of your hands.
#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Well the amount a person plays and the person themselves are factors as well (sweat acidity varies from person to person). There's also the extent of the wear too. You might've worn through the colour layer of the lacquer, but the sanding sealer could still be protecting the neck underneath from the moisture of your hands.


True, and there is also climate to be considered. Also, things llike linseed/terebine or Tru-Oil are more like varnish than oil, because they set quite hard over time. Terebine acts like the lead oxide in old paint formulations.
#7
You need to remove all of the hardware and electronics so you can sand the entire guitar. Otherwise it will look like shit when your done.

Take the string ferrules off the top and bottom of the guitar.
#8
Thank you to everybody who has replied; you've given me some more materials to research but also narrowed down the possibilities. Very much appreciated!

Robbgnarly, I should clarify that I had removed the guitar's ferrules and string-thru holes prior to beginning the sanding process, but I had already reinstalled them upon taking these photos. There's no longer any black paint on the guitar's surface .
#9
Rob is right. If the top photo is what it looks like now, the guitar top needs lots more sanding. The black may be gone, but there is still a hint of undercoat and what looks like filler.

Its ready when you have nothing but pure wood grain to look at.
#10
Quote by juckfush
Thank you to everybody who has replied; you've given me some more materials to research but also narrowed down the possibilities. Very much appreciated!

Robbgnarly, I should clarify that I had removed the guitar's ferrules and string-thru holes prior to beginning the sanding process, but I had already reinstalled them upon taking these photos. There's no longer any black paint on the guitar's surface .

Then you need to remove them and sand better or your refinish will look like shit. Also you need to leave the hardware off until you refinish the entire guitar.

Just trying to help you get the best finish you can
#11
Back to sanding tomorrow, then! Thank you both for the replies - again, it's very much appreciated.

#12
When you start to apply the finish, look for any areas that look different when the stain is on them. If this happens you need to stop and start sanding again, that is an area that still has sealer on it