#1
I have been playing guitar for just over a year and learning fairly easy songs aswell as trying my hand at some heavier stuff, such as Maiden/Trivium/Coheed and Cambria as thats my favorite music. Now i wnat to buy a new guitar and the one i like the look of is:

Epiphone Limited Edition Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom 6 String

http://www.gak.co.uk/en/epiphone-limited-edition-matt-heafy-les-paul-custom-6-string/79767

The price is what i'm looking to pay and I have read some good reveiws and seen it in a store in London at the weekend and really liked the feel and look of it, but my main question is it suitable for a relative beginner? I read it has a heavy sound due to the pick ups but does this mean it can only be played for heavier music?

Sorry for what may seem dumb questions but i am still learning.
#2
Guitar is fine for a beginner and you can play other music on it. You can play any music on any guitar.
#3
So the fact that people mention the fact it has a heavy sound due to the pick ups dosent mean it sounds heavy plugged straight into an amp?
#5
Are you certain that you know what you want guitar-wise? Do you have any specific preferences? If you don't, that suggests you don't know what you want and you only want the MKH LP because Matt's name is on it. I don't mean to offend but most beginners who buy signature guitars buy them solely because of the artist's name is written on it.

Pretty much any guitar is good enough for a beginner if they know how to set it up. With that in mind, there's really no such thing as a guitar that's' good for beginners.' Good guitars are good guitars no matter how much experience you have.

Guitars are not genre specific either. There is nothing stopping you from playing jazz fusion on a Warlock, (and while you'll get a few funny looks from people in a jazz club) it'll sound fine if the amp it's going through is up to achieving that sort of tone. Some guitars do achieve certain sounds more easily than others, but there's no rules governing what instrument you use for any genre. It's all personal preference.

I do personally really like the Matt Heafy sig though. I've played one and the one I tried played really well and I couldn't find any obvious faults. The all-access heel is an awesome feature to have and aesthetically it looks sick. I appreciate the fact that it doesn't scream out loud that it's a signature, as guitars that do that make the player look like a fanboy/wannabe. I also personally prefer the D-shaped neck profile over a standard 60's Slimtaper neck. I wish I had one when I was starting out.

We need to know what amp you'd be running the guitar through as well, as the amp makes up the vast majority of your tone.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 13, 2014,
#6
I have the 7-string version its a pretty solid guitar. Yes you can play any guitar in any genre. I play a lot of death metal and use a ocean blue les paul standard and a telecaster haha.
#7
I understand it may not be en option, but playing it with the amp you intend to use would be the best option. Many elements go into making a "heavy" guitar sound. There are some styles of pick ups that can assist, but your eq, amp settings, effects, string gauge, guitar tuning, and guitar woods all have an impact on that sound. The most important thing is that you enjoy playing it, and it makes your ears happy.
#8
Test it out with your gear if at all possible, and if it improves your tone, get it.

My first priority for getting a heavy guitar is to see if it has active pickups. They aren't necessary, but they really help.
#9
Use a heavy pick too. Like 1mm or more. And don't do the beginner mistake of trying to replicate album heavyness through a real rig, won't happen. So basically, as long as you have some decent humbuckers, and a high gain amp, you'll be in the right direction.
#10
Quote by paul rodway
So the fact that people mention the fact it has a heavy sound due to the pick ups dosent mean it sounds heavy plugged straight into an amp?


totally depends on amp used. you're not going to get a metal sound out of say a Fender Twin Reverb just by plugging that guitar in. the pickups are designed to give you more umph going into the amp which can result in a heavier sound provided the amp is set (and capable) of getting those types of sounds. your sound is based on the interaction of the guitar and amp. amps designed for higher gain will give you the best results when going for a metal sound.
#11
Thanks for all the helpful replys!

Just to make clear i'm not wanting to get a heavy sound straight into the amp, i dont want to be practising say the Beatles and it sounding really heavy and crunchy, I will get a pedal for when i want that sound(when i'm a little better).
#12
Quote by paul rodway
the one i like the look of is:

Epiphone Limited Edition Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom 6 String

http://www.gak.co.uk/en/epiphone-limited-edition-matt-heafy-les-paul-custom-6-string/79767



The Matt Heafy six is a box-stock LP, same as any other LP, with just two differences that should be important to you.

One is that it comes with active pickups, which means that you're going to have to have a supply of 9V batteries in the case, and you're going to have to remember to unplug the guitar when you're not using it (otherwise the batteries will run down). The pickups themselves work well with ...erm... "heavy" type music, but they can be used for nearly anything. You'll find that if you actually work with the volume and tone controls, rather than simply diming them, you can get almost anything you want out of them.

Two is that it comes with the neck heel that all Les Pauls should have. Thanks to Neal Schon and the Schon Sig guitar (which actually copied his Dommengut guitars) that featured a smoothed neck heel, Gibson produced the Axcess (I have one) with a smooth neck heel that makes playing the upper reaches of the fretboard FAR more comfortable. That's the only Les Paul that Gibson produces that has this neck heel, but it's well over $3K. The Matt Heafy is the only Epiphone that has this neck heel (all Epiphone LPs should have this neck heel), far as I know, and I would buy this guitar over other Epiphones purely to have this neck heel on the guitar.

As a beginner, you may not appreciate either of the above for a while. Other things I like about the guitar: It's got a glossy finish. Much easier to wipe off, much easier to wax to protect it from sweat, etc. It's got multi-layer binding on body and headstock. What I don't care for: It's Yet Another All Black Guitar. I'm not particularly concerned with the color of a finish (I've got all kinds), but I'm a bit alarmed at how many black guitars I've managed to accumulate. I don't even particularly care for black guitars. Oh well.

So here's one vote fully in favor of a guitar that, to me, makes all kinds of sense.
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 14, 2014,
#13
Hmm, reading these posts I feel I have to add that the guitar you pick does really dictate your sound. This LP you're looking at has active humbucking pickups, this is a big thing and if it's not the sound you want it could get pretty frustrating - they have a very high output and it's not the way to get a Beatles sound. Even Iron Maiden uses -mostly?- passive pickups.

For just one guitar personally I'd take one with high-output passive humbuckers. Youtubing passive vs active humbuckers should give you plenty of idea to decide for yourself though!
#14
Quote by bornfidelity
Hmm, reading these posts I feel I have to add that the guitar you pick does really dictate your sound.


Nah. Not usually.

It ain't the meat, it's the motion.

Let's try one. Thick solid body guitar made of a single piece of maple burl. Double cutaway, 24 frets clear, smooth neck heel, brass nut, ebony fretboard over a multipiece maple neck, medium jumbo frets, active Bartolini pickups with individual tone/volume, a pair of treble boosts and a varitone-like six-way rotary switch.

Another? Solid mahogany 22-fret neck-through Les Paul with an Axcess-style neck heel, ebony f/b, abalone blocks, jumbo frets, full carved flame maple cap, a Floyd with a big brass aftermarket sustain block added, a Fernandes sustainer, passive pickups (the one in the neck is an 18Kohm single-coil size humbucker), all kinds of binding and a sweepable active mids boost on a push-pull.

An extreme example? Talk to me about a Variax JTV-89F. 25.5" scale, hot passives, Floyd with built-in piezos, 16" radius, jumbo frets, wide nut, available in black or blood red 24-fret board, bolt maple neck with a rosewood fretboard, solid (and fairly thick) mahogany double cutaway superstrat body? Bearing in mind all the variax electronics, what sound is dictated by that guitar?

A more normal example? How about an HSH superstrat neck-through 24-fret 25" scale with medium jumbos, 12" radius, ebony f/b, straight-pull headstock, Wilkinson trem, coil taps and a bridge pickup add-in switch. Solid mahogany body and neck, quilt maple cap. Gold hardware, passive pickups. What kind of music is dictated by that guitar?
#15
Quote by dspellman
Nah. Not usually.

It ain't the meat, it's the motion.

Let's try one. Thick solid body guitar made of a single piece of maple burl. Double cutaway, 24 frets clear, smooth neck heel, brass nut, ebony fretboard over a multipiece maple neck, medium jumbo frets, active Bartolini pickups with individual tone/volume, a pair of treble boosts and a varitone-like six-way rotary switch.

Another? Solid mahogany 22-fret neck-through Les Paul with an Axcess-style neck heel, ebony f/b, abalone blocks, jumbo frets, full carved flame maple cap, a Floyd with a big brass aftermarket sustain block added, a Fernandes sustainer, passive pickups (the one in the neck is an 18Kohm single-coil size humbucker), all kinds of binding and a sweepable active mids boost on a push-pull.

An extreme example? Talk to me about a Variax JTV-89F. 25.5" scale, hot passives, Floyd with built-in piezos, 16" radius, jumbo frets, wide nut, available in black or blood red 24-fret board, bolt maple neck with a rosewood fretboard, solid (and fairly thick) mahogany double cutaway superstrat body? Bearing in mind all the variax electronics, what sound is dictated by that guitar?

A more normal example? How about an HSH superstrat neck-through 24-fret 25" scale with medium jumbos, 12" radius, ebony f/b, straight-pull headstock, Wilkinson trem, coil taps and a bridge pickup add-in switch. Solid mahogany body and neck, quilt maple cap. Gold hardware, passive pickups. What kind of music is dictated by that guitar?


clearly polka. c'mon at least make it a challenge.
#16
Quote by monwobobbo
clearly polka. c'mon at least make it a challenge.


Ah, but what GENRE of polka?
#17
Ive got a £50 strat copy that I bought used. Put a set of rotosound blues 10-52 light top heavy bottom strings on it and that is the only change its had and that through a Marshall mg15cfr will happily play slipknot in drop a. Get your settings right and any guitar will play any music
#18
Quote by dspellman
Ah, but what GENRE of polka?


a migraine.
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#19
Any kind of Epiphone Les Paul is great for a beginner. The catch is picking one you like, one that suits you. Judging from your post I think a Matt Heafy LP would be right up your alley. You like the look, the way it plays, what more is there?

You CAN play softer stuff on it if you're really worried about that. I have active EMG pickups in my guitar and sometimes I roll off the volume knob and play some classic rock.

Like H4T3BR33D3R said, it's all about your amp settings and what you do with your hands.
#20
Quote by dspellman
Ah, but what GENRE of polka?

#1 Polka Death

#2 Polkafarian

#3 Dubpolka

#4 Lithuanian Prog Fusion Polka
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#21
If you like the way it feels, definately take it. Even if you decide you dont like the pickup, you can always change them. As for taking another epiphone instead of this, im not sure that would be a smart choice, since apparently this one has a different kind of neck, because this one is made by Matt's specifications. And its already a pretty good instrument, apparently Matt uses this guitar for live shows, and did most of the last album tracking with it, so it should be pretty good. I was actually a bit on the fence, if i should get it, but i ended up going with an ESP ec-401, because i like the neck better.

So yeah, i think you should get it, but only if you tried a bunch of other ones before. But if you did, and this one feels great, then buy it, it seems like a great guitar. Just dont buy it only because of the name
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