#1
e----8--------------|
B|---5---------6---|
G|---7---------4---|
D|---5---------7---|
A|--------------5---|
E|-------------------|

Everywhere i tried to identify the chords i get weird results.
The root notes seem to be called differently than what they really are.
#2
First one appears to be some sort of F with a G root but idk don't listen to me
#3
Name the notes in the chords. That helps. The first chord is G D E C. It could be Cadd9. The second one is D A B F. That's Dm6 (or Bm7b5 but they have the same notes in them).
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 15, 2014,
#4
First one is a Cadd9 with a G in the bass and the second is a G9 with a D in the bass.
#5
I may not have the most "appropriate" names for the chords, but to me, it's the simplest names for them. Remember, the names may also change depending on the context they're being used in the song. One of the regulars might have a better name for them.

Chord #1:

The notes, from lowest to highest, are G, D, E, and C. I believe that this chord would be a Cadd9 (second inversion). I also really liked the sound of this particular chord.

Chord #2:

Again, the notes are, from lowest to highest, are D, A, B, F. When I played this, it sounded very dissonant with the tritone between B/F and the b2 between the A/B. I would probably think it's a Dm6, but don't quote me on this one.

Again, I hope I helped out!
#6
Depends on context, as always:

I've used that second chord as a Dm6 on many occassions.

Cadd9 for the first one is right enough.
#7
The second chord is also an assumed root chord. A root G makes that a G dominant 7.
#8
Quote by Rensa
e----8--------------|
B|---5---------6---|
G|---7---------4---|
D|---5---------7---|
A|--------------5---|
E|-------------------|

Everywhere i tried to identify the chords i get weird results.
The root notes seem to be called differently than what they really are.


If this is all that's going on, then the first chord's root is G, the second chord's root is D. (They each have a 5th interval lowest in the stack of notes).

But a bass could change everything.

If bass plays G and D also, you've got an ambiguous chord (no maj or min 3rd). Stick in a Bb (try tapping the 13th fret on A string) and you've got a Gm6 with an added 11th. (sounds great). Or B at 14th fret, to get G6 add 11.

Put a C below it (e.g.8th fret, bass E string), all changes again. The (C,G) becomes the lowest 5th, and C becomes the root. Now you've got a C add 9.

cheers, Jerry
#10
Quote by Rensa
Holy crap Jerry, thanks! And thanks everyone who replied!


As a general rule, if a chord has at least one interval of a perfect 5th in it, then you can determine its root. If there's more than one 5th, then the lowest pitched 5th wins. The root of the chord is the root of this lowest 5th (which is the lower of the two pitches in the 5th).

You ok on intervals?

cheer, Jerry
#11
Just keep in mind that the lowest played note in a chord doesn't have to be the root. Knowing that, it shouldn't be hard to just name what notes are used, and come up with a few options of what it could be called. Once you have options (and you will almost always have more than one "correct" option), decide what to call it based on the context.
#12
Quote by the_bi99man
Just keep in mind that the lowest played note in a chord doesn't have to be the root. Knowing that, it shouldn't be hard to just name what notes are used, and come up with a few options of what it could be called. Once you have options (and you will almost always have more than one "correct" option), decide what to call it based on the context.


Thanks man!