#1
So...
I have had a thread a few days ago, detailing a few issues I have had with my new American Strat. And I have to say that, although I solved most of them so far... The constant fiddling with a 1300 euros guitar, is starting to let me down a bit!

Anyway... Long story short, I think the nut on the guitar is acting up. I have done a video to have your opinion:

http://youtu.be/rq6mA6Q2-uE

What do you guys think? You will see that I placed a bit of aluminium foil on the slit of the nut (low E) and that this takes care of the issue. But I am certainly not going to be carrying some aluminium foil on my quite expensive guitar! On top of all, it doesn't really let the string slide along after some whammy usage.

Is this an easy fix? (one other fix, amongst the several I already had to apply, that I can do myself?) Is it because the nut is cut too much or too little? If it is too much, then I have no solution but to get a new nut, right?

Oh well... I am starting to be frustrated! Sorry for that!
#3
If the nut is defective and the guitar is otherwise fine then just contact Fender and arrange to have it fixed by a local guitar tech.
#4
I don't really want to return it... I spent quite a bit of time setting it up, it is playing fine and I like it. I also installed strap locks and fender locking tuners (now it looks like the deluxe strat, minus the arm and the noiseless pickups!!! ).

I live in Europe, so I am not so sure what Fender can do about it... Is there an easy fix for this? One that I can easily do myself?
#5
This is the fix I've been using for a long time for minor nut slot adjustments, and which has been adopted by my repair shop mate:

Lightly clean the bottom of the slot with fine abrasive paper.

Lay a few strands of white cotton in the nut slot in a single neat layer that just covers the bottom.

Hold them taut and in place with poster putty or adhesive tape on the fretboard and headstock.

Carefully apply CA glue from a toothpick to the slot until it only just wets the cotton and wicks down it a short distance on either side of the nut. Don't overdo it.

When the CA is dry, trim the cotton off flush with the nut on both sides with a sharp knife.

No further cleanup should be necessary if the cotton was laid in neatly. If it isn't enough, add another layer of cotton. I have some which were done about 10 years ago and still showing no signs of wear, and they have no detectable effect on tone.
#7
Quote by milcs
I live in Europe, so I am not so sure what Fender can do about it... Is there an easy fix for this? One that I can easily do myself?


You don’t have to send the guitar to Fender USA for service. They contract out with service technicians all over the world to handle warranty repairs. You contact Fender, explain the problem and send them a photo of your receipt, and they’ll put you in contact with someone who will fix the nut.
#8
Just sent an email to Fender Consumer relations! Let«s see what they say...

I am also not eager to start gluing and modding my nut!

What I am baffled with... How can this happen on American strats? Aren't american strats supposed to be the ultimate playing machine? I am so frustrated...
#9
Quote by milcs
What I am baffled with... How can this happen on American strats? Aren't american strats supposed to be the ultimate playing machine? I am so frustrated...


Take this as a lesson about the power of advertising.
#10
You're going to have to fiddle with any guitar, no matter how much it costs. If you can't set up a guitar to remove the buzz spend the $30 and take it to a shop who will.
#11
Quote by jthm_guitarist
You're going to have to fiddle with any guitar, no matter how much it costs.


I have two nice Schecters purchased in 2009 and 2011. Both play great and they’ve still got the factory setup. The notion that all guitars will need some setup work is something Gibson and Fender collectors came up with to excuse flaws in overpriced guitars.
#12
As i said in the other thread I think the problem is the slot angle, that happened on my self built guitar and I had buzz playing open strings and serious intonation problems...it took me a while to figure out the problem, and I've managed to break the nut in half in the process

I'd just have it repaired under warranty
#13
Guess what...
Spent I don't know how many hours around my guitar... I went to bed at 4.30am!!
And what did I just found out at 4.15am????

It was the bloody mo******ing string!!! The STRING!!!!!!!!
After I almost gave up on that low E buzz, I put down my fender and picked up my faithful Yamaha Pacifica 112v. I put a new set of strings in, did a setup on it (straightened the neck a tiny big, lowered the action, corrected intonation) and it was playing well.

I then decided to go back to my Strat. As I had 3 other sets of strings, I decided to try to put a new fat E. I started with a .46 (as I am planning to change the strings to .10-.46) and, as I expected, no buzz noise. Given that when I put the aluminium foil on the slit of the nut, this was just confirming that the slit was too wide for the string.
In any case, this wouldn't be a solution in my eyes... If one day I want to put .9-.42 I would have eventually to deal with the problem. Given I had a set of DRs of the same size, I went ahead and put the .42 in. After I tuned it... No buzz! Jezz....

At least I managed to have a nightmare-free sleep!
#14
Gunny I was just going to ask you about string gauges! Any guitar is setup at the factory for a certain gauge of strings and when you change it the nut slots will either have to be adjusted if stepping up or may actually be too wide if stepping down.
#16
Quote by KenG
Gunny I was just going to ask you about string gauges! Any guitar is setup at the factory for a certain gauge of strings and when you change it the nut slots will either have to be adjusted if stepping up or may actually be too wide if stepping down.

Independently of the string gauge... Now I don't have any buzz. Really, after changing my strings (which were the ones that shipped with the guitar... so I guess, Fender bullets .9-.42), most of my problem went away. No low E buzz, less buzz on the fretboard.
Don't know why it took me so long to change the strings!? :|
#17
The 1st thing I do with any new guitar is change the strings (and clean and set up at the same time). Even if never played strings will oxidize over time and you can't intonate a guitar with old strings.
Still I'm glad you're happy and the Strat is doing what it should for you!
Happy Playing.
#18
Quote by KenG
The 1st thing I do with any new guitar is change the strings (and clean and set up at the same time). Even if never played strings will oxidize over time and you can't intonate a guitar with old strings.
Still I'm glad you're happy and the Strat is doing what it should for you!
Happy Playing.


Spoke too early!!!!
Now it's the D... It's is buzzing like crazy on the 1-7th fret! I am tired of this! I should be crying, but I just feel like laughing of the irony... My Yamanha Pacifica is playing great and cost me 130 euros. My fender american that cost 10x more has been nothing but problems!
#19
Quote by milcs
Spoke too early!!!!
Now it's the D... It's is buzzing like crazy on the 1-7th fret! I am tired of this! I should be crying, but I just feel like laughing of the irony... My Yamanha Pacifica is playing great and cost me 130 euros. My fender american that cost 10x more has been nothing but problems!



Do you have a radius gauge? To get the best action you need to match the radius of your fingerboard to the bridge. Since Fender's are individually adjustable this should be an easy fix.