#1
Just like the title says, Extreme Beginner Question and Y-E-S, I'm serious....

I bought a guitar about a year ago, tried to get into it since I love classic rock & just gave up too quickly. Had a lot going on @ the time so I know that played some part.

Anyway, long question short....

And remember, I'm a beginner so don't shoot me....

But when strumming w/of course my strumming hand, which hand am I hitting the plucking string with???

For example, I'm strumming the biggest string but am I also plucking that exact biggest string with the plucking hand OR am I hitting all the strings. This is what I'm getting confused about. I'm checking out videos online & even did online classes for about a week & not one "lesson" mentioned this.


FYI....told you it was a BEGINNER question, lolol.

Thanks!
Last edited by NJGabesDaddyNY at Nov 16, 2014,
#2
I don't entirely understand what you're asking. Could you possibly rephrase your question? Maybe it's just me.
#3
I'm really not sure I understand. Plucking would basically refer to a type of finger picking, like in bowed instruments when played in pizzicato (pulling and releasing the strings with the picking hand instead of bowing them).

Strumming refers to picking (with a pick or by brushing the fingers) several strings together, as in chords, and usually in a rhythmic pattern when accompanying another instrument.

I'm not sure what exactly do you mean by both strumming and plucking.
#4
I honestly don't know to word it. The hand thats on the long part of the guitar (the head I believe). Let's say you hit the biggest string, now on the body part where I believe it's called Strumming, are you hitting all the strings or just that same Biggest string? Not sure how else to ask it. Definitely know what I wanna ask but maybe I'm just asking it wrong. Lol
#7
I think I understand. If you hit more than one string at a time, it's called strumming. This occurs at the body of the guitar(the large, wide part, where you hold the pick). It's also considered strumming if you only pick one string at a time. If you're right-handed, this is what your right hand does.
As for your other hand(the one on the long part, called the neck), that is called the fretting hand. It's the one that pushes the strings down. If you're left-handed, this is what your left hand does.
Is that what you're asking?
#8
Lol exactly and yup, I was serious. Watching videos online & I really couldn't tell the difference. Thanks for the explanation.
#9
Quote by NJGabesDaddyNY
Lol exactly and yup, I was serious. Watching videos online & I really couldn't tell the difference. Thanks for the explanation.


Haha, well sorry! I guess you wouldn't be able to really know the difference if you are brand new to playing. Good luck!
#10
May help you to get some software that allows you to slow down a song a lot, without changing pitch. Then you'll hear how someone is strumming more clearly. The word "strumming" implies more than one string is being hit by the hand with the pick. That motion is usually fast enough that the sounds of each string blur into each other. If a chord is being played, you don't have to strum across all 6 strings. Strumming fewer strings changes the sound.

Good luck. Jerry
#11
If you're just confused about nomenclature, "strumming" usually refers to playing the RHYTHM part of a song. You don't "strum" lead guitar, or a melody, you "pick" it. Doing the "strumming" with bare fingers, is called, "finger picking". (But never "finger strumming").

The work on the neck you do with your left hand, is most often called, "fretting", or "fingering".
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
Doing the "strumming" with bare fingers, is called, "finger picking". (But never "finger strumming").


I'd say that "finger picking" (or finger style) refers more to the type of polyphonic playing usually found in classical guitar (where you often play separate treble and bass parts on distant strings using your thumb and the rest of the fingers).
#13
Quote by TLGuitar
I'd say that "finger picking" (or finger style) refers more to the type of polyphonic playing usually found in classical guitar (where you often play separate treble and bass parts on distant strings using your thumb and the rest of the fingers).
You know, after reading the first post, one had to know this thread would very quickly turn into a semantic free for all. And to quote our last president, "Wubba", "mission accomplished"!
#15
Are you talking about the "name" of the different parts of playing or you are talking about the fact that you hit more than one string?

For the naming:
The Guitar Frets are used to "fret" the guitar, where you "select" the notes you want to play.


The Picking / Strumming is done with the pick, or picking hand. The "strumming" is a motion of the pick to hit the strings.


That being said, if you have issues with hitting more strings than needed, well, it takes times and practice to master it. Start by going slower, take time to analyse how you do it, don't rush.

Also, do the whole link posted by Tazz3 (justinguitar.com), he is trully good with teaching every details you need to know!
Last edited by t1mman at Nov 18, 2014,
#16
I'm also not sure I totally understand the question but I'll take a stab at it.

Every player has a picking and fretting hand (for me that's my left hand doing the fretting and my right hand doing the picking/strumming).

The fretting hand (on the guitar neck/the long part) is supposed to rest on the target notes you want to play and the picking hand is used to strike one or multiple strings (this is the strumming motion you're referring to, you use this motion when playing a chord with several notes on different strings that make up the chord). You can play one note at a time or several notes at a time, it all depends on the song and what part of the song you're playing.

Chords (multiple notes played at the same time) are typically used to play the rhythm section of a band while the solos are usually done by picking individual notes. There are exceptions to these general principles that you'll learn later but since you're just starting out I'm just trying to give you the basics that you will build off of later.

Hope that helps. If you need me to clarify anything let me know.