#1
I'm replacing the strings on my ibanez mmm1 baritone guitar. I have not changed the tuning on the guitar and I'm replacing the strings that were on there before with the same ones (just a new pack; d'addario light baritone strings) I have the guitar in drop c. I have not adjusted the neck or the intonation on the bridge or anything. When I put the high e string on and wind it, the string gets to a certain note and then will no longer get higher in pitch even though I'm tightening the tuning peg. I thought eventually it'd get higher if I kept turning the peg tighter but it doesnt and then breaks. What's going on? I've broken two strings from doing this now and it's super frustrating. I have no idea why the strings would be breaking now even though I'm replacing the string with the same one that was on the guitar before without changing any of the setup.
#3
Yep. It's like it gets to a certain note and I keep plucking and tightening the peg and it won't go up in pitch anymore and then it just breaks. Lost two strings doing this. I just wondered if it would be an easier fix than taking the guitar to be setup even though the other strings are fine. I just have no idea why it's doing this and it's super frustrating.
#4
Check the bridge saddle for a burr? It could be getting caught on it, then breaking when it get to the right tension. Also, make sure your nut is lubed The string will slip sometimes from the friction, or jump up/down in tuning in strange increments if its not properly lubed. I lube the nut every time I change strings.
#6
a pencil will lube the nut. Draw in the slot.
A burr is a sharp edge.
Do the initial tuning by ear so you know you're in the ballpark, then use the tuner to fine tune it.
#7
The problem is almost certainly the (electronic) tuner you’re using.
• Try changing the tuner battery. Tuners can get weird when the battery is dead.
• See if hitting the same note on the second string and see if the tuner can register that.
•*Just tune the second string and tune the first string by ear to match the same note on the second string.
• Buy a new tuner.
#8
Quote by jpnyc
The problem is almost certainly the (electronic) tuner you’re using.
• Try changing the tuner battery. Tuners can get weird when the battery is dead.
• See if hitting the same note on the second string and see if the tuner can register that.
•*Just tune the second string and tune the first string by ear to match the same note on the second string.
• Buy a new tuner.


It's not the tuner. I'm using a YouTube video because my tuner is at my practice space where my band plays. It's the same video I've used before too.
#9
Quote by Cathbard
a pencil will lube the nut. Draw in the slot.
A burr is a sharp edge.
Do the initial tuning by ear so you know you're in the ballpark, then use the tuner to fine tune it.


I don't feel any sharp edges at all. I just bought a 5 pack of .013 strings online and they should be here Tuesday so Ill have a couple tries to get it to work but I'd rather just figure it out. I'll try the pencil thing but I didn't feel anything sharp in the nut or saddle area
#10
I have this problem with my Les Paul with Steinberger gearless tuners, it will just stop raising pitch at a certain point. My solution is just to give the string more tension, not so much slack. My tuners are a little different than standard, but that fixes the problem every time.
#11
Quote by Funk Monk
I have this problem with my Les Paul with Steinberger gearless tuners, it will just stop raising pitch at a certain point. My solution is just to give the string more tension, not so much slack. My tuners are a little different than standard, but that fixes the problem every time.


This is a noob question, but how do I do that? How do I give the string more tension and not so much slack?
#12
What I do is take needle-nose pliers and pull the string to give it tension. My tuners then clamp down. In your case, you would give it tension the same way and start winding, once it goes around once it will hold the tension. Basically just wind up the string the same you always did, but give the string a little more tension on the end, pull it with something. You could even unwind the strings you just strung, but give them a little more tension this time as you wind up.
Last edited by Funk Monk at Nov 17, 2014,
#13
Isn't drop C a pretty high tuning for a baritone scale length guitar, with baritone strings?
#14
Quote by the_bi99man
Isn't drop C a pretty high tuning for a baritone scale length guitar, with baritone strings?


It is, but if OP likes long necks and stiff string tension he’ll be fine.
#15
Quote by jpnyc
It is, but if OP likes long necks and stiff string tension he’ll be fine.


I just wonder if that could have something to do with strings breaking.
#16
This might be a much different problem than my guitar though, I didn't consider that your strings are breaking. Are they breaking at your bridge, or your neck by the nut?
#17
Quote by Funk Monk
This might be a much different problem than my guitar though, I didn't consider that your strings are breaking. Are they breaking at your bridge, or your neck by the nut?


They're breaking by the nut, near the tuning pegs.
#18
Quote by jpnyc
It is, but if OP likes long necks and stiff string tension he’ll be fine.


Yeah, that's the reason I like the baritone. Gives me no string slack and barely any buzz with the high tension so I can make the notes nice and tight and punchy and (dare I say it) djenty.
#19
Quote by the_bi99man
Isn't drop C a pretty high tuning for a baritone scale length guitar, with baritone strings?

That's what I was thinking. That string is meant to be a B. Tuning it up to D is a pretty big stretch. That's 3 semitones. If you tried to tune a .010 E-string on a regular guitar up to G, you would probably have the same problem. If it worked before, you likely just got lucky. You should just try lighter strings. If they work, then the tuning was just too high. If they still break, check the guitar for problems.
#20
Quote by JELIFISH19
That's what I was thinking. That string is meant to be a B. Tuning it up to D is a pretty big stretch. That's 3 semitones. If you tried to tune a .010 E-string on a regular guitar up to G, you would probably have the same problem. If it worked before, you likely just got lucky. You should just try lighter strings. If they work, then the tuning was just too high. If they still break, check the guitar for problems.


Could wrapping the strings wrong around the tuning peg effect it? I realized now I didn't wrap it around the tuning peg twice before threading it through.
#21
Quote by reservedforchoi
Could wrapping the strings wrong around the tuning peg effect it? I realized now I didn't wrap it around the tuning peg twice before threading it through.


I am no expert, but never heard of wrapping around the peg before going through the thread, sounds like a hassle.


I would start by going with the tuning that the guitar was intended for, using strings that the guitar was intended for.

From there you can troubleshoot what the problem is, which is mostly like tension that the guitar doesn't like, probaby caused by customization if you will.
#22
Quote by reservedforchoi
Could wrapping the strings wrong around the tuning peg effect it? I realized now I didn't wrap it around the tuning peg twice before threading it through.


Is the string actually breaking, or just popping out of the tuning peg? If you're tuning higher than the string gauge and scale length is intended for, not having a good wrap on the tuning peg could almost certainly cause it to come loose and pop out.
#23
DEFINITELY lube the nut - I often do the same with the saddles, myself. Who'd've thought a pencil could be so handy? I've snapped so many strings as a newb guitarist because of not lubing the nut. Also check the groove in the nut for any obvious roughness which might be causing the breakages.

Restringing is something a lot of beginners struggle with but practice and avoiding bad habits in the early days is key.

To help you along, here's a pretty decent video showing you how it's done. There are some good tips in here.

Restringing an Electric Guitar.
Last edited by Yetaxa at Nov 18, 2014,