#1
This /may/ be a stupid question (but I hear there's no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid people) ...

Anyway, I have been learning the Em pentatonic scale with my guitar teacher and I was just wondering if there was any rhyme or reason as to what makes a good lick or run... I find myself playing notes typically in a similar sequence so I was just looking for expert tips/advice from you guys. Right now I have only learned positions 1 and 2 (up to the 5th fret on the E string).

Any useful links that you guys enjoy would be much appreciated as well!
#2
No, it's all really subjective. But I guess the one thing that might be universal is being "in time". Even though the definition of "in time" depends on who you are playing with.

I would just copy your heroes and not worry about playing "good" runs too much.
#3
Quote by ouchies


I would just copy your heroes and not worry about playing "good" runs too much.


This. Look at how your favorite players pentatonic runs and use that in other keys, other octaves, with other sequences/intervals and together with other runs.
#4
Put on a few SRV, Peter Green, Mike Bloomfield, Clapton, and Robben Ford albums. "Take what you need and make it your own" is the international blues motto.
#6
Quote by Elintasokas
The problem with me is that I like playing blues, but not listening to it XD


That's weird
#7
Quote by Elintasokas
The problem with me is that I like playing blues, but not listening to it XD


Big problem. Find something you do like to listen to and learn that. We play best when we express the music in our bones and not what someone else thinks is cool.
#8
Couple of simple ideas. Make a sequence. e.g. start, down, down, up, start. Then choose next start note as next note down in pentatonic and repeat.

Trying usings fourths. e.g, for A m pent, start at C on 8th fret, 1st string:

8 (1st) 8 (2nd) 5 (2nd) 5 (1st) ... C G E A.

Repeat starting on B string etc.

Reverse direction when starting from 6th string.

Try playing one one string. Choose note, slide down to next but one pentatonic note. Then back up to missed out note, and do the same from there. This sounds amazing.

Or chromaticse the pentatonic. Listen to explanation here: https://soundcloud.com/jerry-kramskoy-1/tips-for-using-chromaticism

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Nov 19, 2014,