#1
Hi I am a rhythm guitarist/singer I can do both at the same time but when I try to record Guitar over drumtrack I find myself playing out of rhythm. If I record vocals over drumtrack and then guitar over both then it's sounds perfect is this normal/acceptable? It's not on every song so I'm thinking that maybe drumtrack confuses me it's simple -kick kick kick snare so I want to hurry. And the tempo isn't the problem as well. Because in many faster songs I can stay in rhythm but slower ones I want to hurry.
Any way the main question - is it acceptable to write vocals before guitar or I have a lot of work to do? Or could it be confusing drum track?
#2
If it works for you, then that's perfectly acceptable. However you're most comfortable doing it. There are no rules for that sort of thing.
#3
Quote by chaosmoon
If it works for you, then that's perfectly acceptable. However you're most comfortable doing it. There are no rules for that sort of thing.


Yep, any way you can get it down is good
#5
NAH its ok, recording and composing is kind of a personal process if you find a way that its easier for you go for it
#7
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Are you sure the vocals don't mask any bad guitar playing?

Show us a recording please.

Honestly, I think that's irrelevant. Does guitar playing mask any bad vocals?

If anything, the vocals can be muted to check the guitar performance.
#8
Quote by chaosmoon
Honestly, I think that's irrelevant. Does guitar playing mask any bad vocals?

If anything, the vocals can be muted to check the guitar performance.



How is it irrelevant?

TS says he can sing and play guitar perfectly at the same time, but can't play guitar on it's own.

That's illogical, hence I want to deduce it's 100% not in the playing already.

I've been teaching guitar for well over 6 years, and I can tell you from experience and many people I taught, that there's a bigger % of them not noticing stuff. Even if I straight up ask them, and some even say they feel it's the right thing, and they play an entire chord a fret too low, and don't hear this.

I'm not saying that this is the case, but people have selective ears, you can filter noises you don't like, and especially with your own playing you tend to overlook things.

Also asking for 10 minutes to upload an 8 bar sound sample with the potential reward of getting something out off it, I mean you must be a donk to find that a bad deal.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 22, 2014,
#9
I had a punk rock drummer friend that thought she had perfect timing and she was also a vocalist. So when she signs her timing dropped.
It is best to practice playing by itself before recording but whatever gets the take.
#10
Quote by xxdarrenxx
How is it irrelevant?

TS says he can sing and play guitar perfectly at the same time, but can't play guitar on it's own.

That's illogical, hence I want to deduce it's 100% not in the playing already.

I've been teaching guitar for well over 6 years, and I can tell you from experience and many people I taught, that there's a bigger % of them not noticing stuff. Even if I straight up ask them, and some even say they feel it's the right thing, and they play an entire chord a fret too low, and don't hear this.

I'm not saying that this is the case, but people have selective ears, you can filter noises you don't like, and especially with your own playing you tend to overlook things.

Also asking for 10 minutes to upload an 8 bar sound sample with the potential reward of getting something out off it, I mean you must be a donk to find that a bad deal.


Maybe irrelevant was the wrong word. I agree with you, that it can mask wrong playing.

However, any order that you record something could mask bad playing. Recording bass after drums can mask bad bass playing, and vocals after everything else could mask bad vocals. What I meant (and should have been more specific) was that it would be a problem anyways. To check for bad guitar playing, solo the recorded guitar and listen to it, as well as listening in the mix. Same thing if you were to record it vice versa. Either way it's a good practice to do, regardless of order.