#1
OK sorry to disappoint but this is actually only about the first 3. I'm sure it's not the first one in existence, but here's this one.

It analyzes your throws, in addition to thousands of others, in an attempt to beat you.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/science/rock-paper-scissors.html?_r=1&

Playing against the veteran version (the mode that uses thousands of previous rock-paper-scissors data) in 30 games I got 7 wins, 10 losses, and 13 ties.
#3
I *really* have nothing else to do, so I played a hundred on novice, finished with 29 ties, 35 wins, and on the 100th throw, the computer overtook me and had 36 wins. I had a solid 8 or so lead for most of the time.
#4
7-6-2 against novice

2-2-11 against veteran

let's be honest, i'm playing against a computer program where i have to choose what i'm going to do before the round's even started.

i'm calling bullshit.
#5
Well you could say everything in life is predetermined and so whether or not you are going to win has already been decided
#8
'kay, 6 wins, 10 ties, 4 losses against the veteran

EDIT: and 6 wins, 4 ties and 10 losses against novice.

In fact, thinking about it, isn't novice harder than veteran ? Just think about it. Novice studies your moves only, while Veteran is an amalgam of every player . So, against veteran, you have to overturn the way people think in general, while in novice you have to overturn yourself.
#9
It looks like it just takes your last 4 moves, it's last 4 moves and looks at the most common next move after that series and does what'd win. Would be more fun if it did more intensive analysis of you specifically.

Playing veteran i was tied with it for the whole time as you'd just expect by chance I guess
#11
After 50 rounds on veteran using a random number generator to decide my throws [1 being rock, 2 being paper, 3 being scissors], the final tally is:

26 wins, 12 ties and 12 losses.

I guess my idea was that since the veteran is drawing upon 200,000 games played against humans and thus able to detect patterns, a truly random opponent would have an advantage.

Hypothesis confirmed.

This pointless pseudo-scientific endeavor has been brought to you by viewers like you
#12
I don't know what are you trying to confirm. Of course if you have a random generator, chances are that you win, because the veteran ( and the novice ) thing is based upon patterns, and you are going merely by chance.

I still insist that I find the novice to be much harder than the veteran, because the whole point of Rock-Paper-Scissors is to understand how other people would think, and the novice is like you're playing against your own self, so you have to think how to beat yourself, thinking how you'd beat yourself, thinking how you'd beat yourself ( until infinity ).
#13
Quote by E7#9
After 50 rounds on veteran using a random number generator to decide my throws [1 being rock, 2 being paper, 3 being scissors], the final tally is:

26 wins, 12 ties and 12 losses.

I guess my idea was that since the veteran is drawing upon 200,000 games played against humans and thus able to detect patterns, a truly random opponent would have an advantage.

Hypothesis confirmed.

This pointless pseudo-scientific endeavor has been brought to you by viewers like you

this was my next plan
#14
^
That's exactly what I was trying to confirm: that a random number generator would have a greater chance of winning over a pattern based opponent. I just wanted to satisfy my own curiosity though; I don't consider it the least bit insightful

I agree with you [seventh angel] on the novice being harder, at least in the long term. I think the novice level is easier in the beginning, but will become progressively harder the more rounds you play for the reason you brought up.
#15
It's just that, going random, you have exactly 1/3 of chances to get it, but if you put some thought to it, considering how well you can beat patterns, it can increase or decrease your chances, decreasing being way more likely

I thought you were calling that game pointless pseudo-scientific, and not your own theory. My bad at misinterpretating you. And I don't think your "experiment" was pointless because you are most likely correct
#17
Quote by seventh_angel
so you have to think how to beat yourself, thinking how you'd beat yourself, thinking how you'd beat yourself ( until infinity ).



Sounds like an average UGers night
#18
I did that a few days ago and got like a 3:1 ratio against the veteran thing

it's actually really easy.. since humans are predictable you only have to 1up your first hunch most of the time