#1
***THIS IS NOT INTENDED TO BE A DISCUSSION ABOUT HOW GREAT/AWFUL CAGED IS***

In regards to learning the fretboard, what are alternative methods to the CAGED system? What should I learn after CAGED?

I have learned the major scale shapes (and its modes) using the caged system. I have learned a lot of basic chords, and I am currently working on arpeggios (7, maj7, min7) using the caged system.

Ultimately I would like to improve my improvisation and composition skills. I think that I could spend a lot more time studying the CAGED system, but I often hear people rant about how awful it is. What I never see is alternatives or what to learn after CAGED.

I appreciate your responses, and I apologize if this is a repeat thread... I have had a real hard time learning more about this.

(I have an inclining that the next step is to learn intervals, but I have no ideal how to go about that)
#2
I use a modified version of CAGED, I think you did well to learn that. I find knowing the pentatonic in box and in stretch versions is good. The major one, in relation to the major scale. 3nps, and major scale box pattern. also I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio. I use that with CAGED. to me CAGED is really only A-E-C/D. 3 shapes for every I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio chord.

I'm not sure exactly what you know, or how you play, so I can't really make a strong suggestion, but I think maybe 3nps might be where you'd want to go next as far as knowing the fretboard is concerned.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Nov 18, 2014,
#3
It really depends where you want to go with guitar. Ultimately learning ALL your scales and ALL your chords is when you begin to have real fretboard power. There are only 12 notes, how hard can it be?

If Bluegrass is your passion maybe spend some time working with your right hand. Wanna little jazz to seep into your playing? Use the diminished scale. It is the Robben Ford secret sauce.
#4
so you should learn theory and chord construction rather than chord patterns, there are many was to make the same chord or scale, instead of memorizing them, learn to make them, and how to modify them
#5
CAGED is a more restrictive view of the 5 region system, where a block of 12 frets is broken up into 5 regions. The 1st region is partially staked out by the root being on the 6th string. Then from there, all octaves and duplicates of that root are found, which ends up with the equivalent root being found 12 frets higher on the 6th string. Then these octaves/duplicates can be used as rough landmarks for breaking out 5 regions.



Then, each region is visualised wrt where the intervals are found relative the root(s) in that region. But this doesn;t emphasise the major triad shapes. They're present ... but the focus is awareness of how to find intervals (and these reinforce scale, chord and arpeggio knowledge and shapes).

It's then straight-forward to join together 2 adjacent regions, and you can use this to give you 3 note-per-string patterns. But it's also very useful to be able to traverse horizontally across all the regions (e.g. playing 2 string patterns).

To help avoid getting lost, a reall useful pattern is the simple (1,2,3,4,5) played on two strings. This can act as a landmark wherever you are.

Or remember the following number series "14, 25, 36". and "51, 62, 73".

On string pairs tuned a 4th apart (like E,A ... or B,E), then 1 on the lower string has 4 as its neighbour on the same fret on the upper string ... hence the mnemonic "14". And so on.

A useful skill is to feel comfy in one region ... then traverse horizontally with one/two string patterns, the settle down again in another region.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Nov 19, 2014,
#6
I agree with jerry ^ focussing on intervals is the way to go. Learn two ways of playing each interval from each string. Start with octaves and fifths. These will give you a skeleton for the rest of the exercise.
#7
Instead of visualizing your fretboard in a scalar fashion, try viewing it as clusters of chords. It's similar to CAGED but has more flavor as you can view other chords in the same keys.

I do the very Eric Johnson-y thing where I view the board as extended arpeggios and the pentatonic.
#8
Quote by jerrykramskoy
CAGED is a more restrictive view of the 5 region system... ...doesn;t emphasise the major triad shapes.
I disagree. But this isn't about discussion of CAGED as much as alternatives so...

TS, the most common alternative to the CAGED method is the 3 note per string (3nps) method.

This method breaks the major scale into seven shapes each starting on the a different note of the scale on the low E string. You play three notes on that low E string then move up to the a string and play the next three notes of the scale on the A string, then you play the next three notes of the scale on the D string etc. You work through all the strings.

This method uses seven shapes because each shape is based off a different note of the scale based on the low E string. The benefit is that it trains your fingers to find the scale quickly and allows for speed. It is often a preferred method by many teachers that have students that want to focus on speed. It does teach the scale across the fretboard but doesn't show how the scale relates to chords quite as clearly as the CAGED system and the shapes six or seven frets which requires your hand to move up or down the neck for one position.

There are those that prefer to just learn all the notes on the fretboard by starting with the first five frets until they have that memorized then adding two more frets until they have that memorized and two more etc. until they know the entire fretboard over the whole neck.

There are those that focus on intervals just learning specific interval shapes. From any note on any string they will know how to play a major second, minor third, perfect fifth, major sixth or any interval based on "interval" shapes.

The thing is it doesn't have to be an "instead of" kind of thing.

I find the CAGED method an excellent starting point it can be continuously built upon to the point where you are so far beyond the initial box shapes that you started with you just see the fretboard. Of course you get out what you put in, as with all learning.
#10
Quote by ouchies
Instead of visualizing your fretboard in a scalar fashion, try viewing it as clusters of chords. It's similar to CAGED but has more flavor as you can view other chords in the same keys.

I do the very Eric Johnson-y thing where I view the board as extended arpeggios and the pentatonic.


Go try onehourmethod chord app (free) for scales as well. Take for instance A-major pentatonic scale: just choose A6/9 for chord and you can see all the notes you can use on the whole fretboard. Very visual and can be played as well.

-PG
onehourmethod.com