#1
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FMVKRQZ

It's a survey on a topic that's been done several times before, I know.

And I understand that musical instrument manufacturing doesn't consume all that much in terms of natural resources when compared to furniture makers and the like. But I still don't think that negates the issue though. Change in the materials used in guitars is still going to need to change, even if guitar building itself isn't the main cause of the problem.

My lecturer is a fan of the idea anyway, and in fact, he was the guy who suggested this idea for the design project. He is the guy who is ultimately marking my work (and academically it boils down to the person marking it whether or not it's a good project, such is the education system) and I couldn't think of a better idea that I could investigate in the space of 4 months, so I decided to take this one on.

I'd really appreciate your input.

Thank you for your time.

EDIT: Another thing I should mention is that I would've liked to have given people the ability to give more in-depth opinions on the questions asked because some people think the questions are too binary and wish to give a more detailed opinion (which is a fair criticism I suppose), but survey monkey only allows a maximum number of 10 questions for non 'pro' users. I'm sorry about that guys.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 19, 2014,
#3
The most sustainable guitar is a sequenced guitar played by a computer. We're long past the rhetoric from the purists that you need to have a physical guitar if you want your music to have 'soul' (whatever that means...).

Lets hurry up and embrace the future.
#6
Quote by Pastafarian96
@teegman: I'd rather shit in my hands and clap

And you'd still produce better music than teegman.
#8
Done. Now I'm assuming I can win an iphone or something? All surveys I usually answer involve a chance to win an iphone. I don't actually want an iphone, but I just like knowing that I could potentially own one and have no need for it.
#9
Quote by ultimate-slash
Done. Now I'm assuming I can win an iphone or something? All surveys I usually answer involve a chance to win an iphone. I don't actually want an iphone, but I just like knowing that I could potentially own one and have no need for it.

What you really need to win is a new amp.
#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What you really need to win is a new amp.

Awesome. So when do I hear if I've won the amp?
#12
Quote by ultimate-slash
Awesome. So when do I hear if I've won the amp?

When you hear it.
#13
Quote by teegman
The most sustainable guitar is a sequenced guitar played by a computer. We're long past the rhetoric from the purists that you need to have a physical guitar if you want your music to have 'soul' (whatever that means...).

Lets hurry up and embrace the future.


Wait... aren't you the guy that was just saying that autotune makes learning to sing a pointless skill?

#16
Cutting trees to make stuff isn't a problem dude. The way most companies do it is the real problem.

If you cut 100 trees and grow 150 others you're helping the world. There are a few companies doing something close to this.
#19
Quote by UltimateGuizar
Done, also, sorry for my final answer.

Now I'm curious about your final answer.
#20
like guitar manufacturers, I've got wood.

srsly tho I think some of the problem is to do with clarity of sound and harmonic and tonal range. Does a metal or acrylic guitar have a comparable range to a traditional wooden one? Could La Monte Young's overtone studies be done as effectively on a plastic piano, if we entertain such an idea? Whereas furniture can have many a material, musical instruments keep to certain materials due to scientific basis, so manufacturing with more sustainable materials is less desirable until we know which ones give a good tonal range.
#21
Quote by Banjocal
like guitar manufacturers, I've got wood.

srsly tho I think some of the problem is to do with clarity of sound and harmonic and tonal range. Does a metal or acrylic guitar have a comparable range to a traditional wooden one? Could La Monte Young's overtone studies be done as effectively on a plastic piano, if we entertain such an idea? Whereas furniture can have many a material, musical instruments keep to certain materials due to scientific basis, so manufacturing with more sustainable materials is less desirable until we know which ones give a good tonal range.

But then again, we're not limited to simple lumps of plastic or metal. Assuming we can sufficiently advance 3d printing techniques, we could possibly make a synthetic substitute that has far better acoustic properties than those currently in use.
#22
I don't know whether "it sounds a bit better than this or that" is really a good enough reason to support deforestation
#28
Build me a guitar made out of the tears of 20 virgins and sell it to me for cheaper than a wooden guitar and you got yourself a deal.