#1
I'm performing one of my Christian songs at my Church this weekend, and I'm worried that my guitar pick is going to fly out of my hand, or fly into the sound hole while performing. I can't just stop and try and retrieve the pick during the performance. What would you recommend I do in this situation?
Last edited by ianhulett at Nov 20, 2014,
#2
Invest into a pick holder and attach it into your microphone stand and attach it into somewhere you can reach quickly (IE on microphone stand or on your guitar strap). Or just keep a big pile in your pocket. A big pile so you dont have to awkwardly hunt down that single one that has dug its way deep into your pants.

If your pick goes flying you can grab a new one within seconds if you have extras nearby.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#3
Quote by MaaZeus
Invest into a pick holder and attach it into your microphone stand and attach it into somewhere you can reach quickly (IE on microphone stand or on your guitar strap). Or just keep a big pile in your pocket. A big pile so you dont have to awkwardly hunt down that single one that has dug its way deep into your pants.

If your pick goes flying you can grab a new one within seconds if you have extras nearby.


^This^

pick holder will cost you $3 and save you embarrassment.
#5
You say 1 song, so pockets are not an option. This is what I would do:

1) Buy a pickholder that you can clip on a mic stand
- One clipped elsewhere (such as headstock etc.) will work, but is less convenient.
- As a last resort have a couple on a flat surface nearby
2) Keep playing, even if it goes wrong!
- Always keep going. That is a golden rule in performance, people will forgive mistakes; solos being sloppy; a couple of fumbly chords; but you can guarantee they will remark on it if you stop mid-song to grab another pick!
- It may be harder to play the song without a pick, but even if you just mash the strings like a beginner slap-bassist it will come across a lot lot better than if you stop and try and re-start. (restarting a song is also pretty much the hardest most nerve-racking thing you could possible do on stage!)
3) Have a practice playing it without a pick
- It's not going to do you any harm, and if something goes wrong then you've been there before so it's not quite as daunting
- Professional players who run around on stage and can play on with broken strings etc. can do so because they are incredibly experienced and know the songs really well. They'll have probably played the song hundreds or more likely thousands of times. That means when something goes wrong it's likely happened before and they can play the riff on a different string etc. to cover because that's how they tried it a dozen times in the studio so the muscle memory is there.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Nov 20, 2014,
#6
Keep a couple sticking out from under your pickguard/scratch plate if you have one. That's the most accessible place to keep them.
#7
dont yell out "jesus christ." but really just get a pick holder and you are fine or buy the picks with a cutout star in them (Everly Star Grip Guitar Pick)
Gibson 58 VOS, Gibson Rich Robinson ES-335, Fender Strat, Fender RoadWorn 50's Tele, Gibson LP Jr Special

Marshall JTM45, Fender BJR NOS
#8
Quote by doive

2) Keep playing, even if it goes wrong!
- Always keep going. That is a golden rule in performance, people will forgive mistakes; solos being sloppy; a couple of fumbly chords; but you can guarantee they will remark on it if you stop mid-song to grab another pick!
- It may be harder to play the song without a pick, but even if you just mash the strings like a beginner slap-bassist it will come across a lot lot better than if you stop and try and re-start. (restarting a song is also pretty much the hardest most nerve-racking thing you could possible do on stage!)


Yep this is really good advice in general, not just for dropping a pick. It's a lot better to miss or incorrectly play a couple of notes/chords during a performance than to just stop playing entirely. Many people won't even notice if you miss a couple notes, or if they do it won't be a big deal. Everyone notices if your rhythm is bad because you stopped playing to correct a mistake though.
#9
This weekend you say?
No time to scoot out and buy a pick holder?

A knob of blu tac with a spare jammed into it somewhere inconspicuous on your guitar.
Charvel / Godin / Peavey / Marshall / AMT